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Forum topic by Mark Shultz posted 08-15-2019 02:05 AM 214 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark Shultz

126 posts in 2845 days


08-15-2019 02:05 AM

Im looking to make an outdoor sign of sorts, and was thinking of having a logo cnc’d into a piece of wood, species tbd. To highlight the logo, i plan to use colored epoxy. The piece will be surrounded by natural, greying unfinished boards. My question is if this new piece will last unfinished, or will the epoxy eventually pop out due to weathering? I dont want to cover it all with a finish.


7 replies so far

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

679 posts in 366 days


#1 posted 08-15-2019 07:30 AM

You didn’t mention what type of wood you plan on using. I did two signs in pine for a friend. Routed, painted and Poly. The paint and finish had to redone yearly. Not so bad (my wife redid them for three years, till the organization moved to another building). The pine lasted the duration of use, but the paint and finish didn’t. Outdoor signs, Redwood or Cedar may be your best bet. You could burn your logo and sand the wood around the logo.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1926 posts in 618 days


#2 posted 08-15-2019 11:39 AM

the general populace always leans towards epoxy for sign lettering.
epoxy is not UV tolerant – at all. so yes, it will eventually fail and
pretty much ruin your sign.
just plain ole latex house paint will last much, much longer in the routed
lettering than anything else. and much, much easier to redo every few years.

this is a sign I made over 20 years ago. it is 4/4 rough sawn cedar with hand routed
lettering (no CNC involved). it took about 5 years to turn grey and it still looks good.
depending on what part of the world you live in, size of the sign and its purpose
generally determines the type of wood to use.


Five Years Later
[there was no adhesive or dowels used between the boards. they are
“free floating” within the frame. you can see wood movement and shrinkage.
this was done per the customer’s request. to have that natural rustic look].

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Mark Shultz's profile

Mark Shultz

126 posts in 2845 days


#3 posted 08-15-2019 02:57 PM

thanks for the input guys. my ‘sign’ is not as grand as those in the photos. it will be an annotated marker for an overlook when someone walks down a long flight of stairs and stands at a landing. The piece will effectively replace a bit of the railing at the overlook. my piece is about 40” x 6”, will have several words on it (e.g. name of the overlook), and sit flat (e.g. when you stand in front of it, you could place a hand, or a drink, on the piece).

the landing/overlook is in the woods, so not a lot of direct light, but sitting flat will cause a lot of pooling water right on the verbiage. I’ll probably use teak since hands will go on it. I’m not too concerned about it looking faded, as the whole area is rustic, but i don’t want the epoxy to pop out in some letters and not in others and then look silly. It would seem paint would pop out even faster than epoxy given the flat / pooling scenario?

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John Smith

1926 posts in 618 days


#4 posted 08-15-2019 04:11 PM

no, the paint will be permanent. it will be imbedded in the wood fibers.
the National Park Service uses pressure treated pine for their small
directional and informational signs such as that and redwood for the
larger projects. here in Florida, the NPS has switched to the plastic
lumber and it appears that their real wood signs will be a thing of the past.
simple hand routing will give you the look you want and skip
the CNC unless that is the way you want to go.
if this were my project, I would make the 1×6 top rail with the engraved
board come out at an angle in front with bracing . . . . . sort of like this.
this would eliminate any standing water in the lettering.
a round bottom bit would be my preference.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2385 posts in 2253 days


#5 posted 08-15-2019 04:38 PM



- WoodenDreams

This is a very cool looking sign . Because it has a folk art look :) .
I like it a lot.

-- Aj

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5631 posts in 3698 days


#6 posted 08-15-2019 05:34 PM

I wouldn’t use teak; too easy to be stolen by anyone who recognizes the value of teak; stick with pine or DF. You might also consider a material made by Coastal Enterprises Inc. https://precisionboard.com/signage/sign-builder-illustrated/

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

679 posts in 366 days


#7 posted 08-15-2019 05:48 PM

My wife used a Marine Varnish the third year of refinishing the sign.

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