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Tilting Craftsman 113. model problems

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Forum topic by scribble posted 08-14-2019 01:15 PM 157 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scribble

212 posts in 2656 days


08-14-2019 01:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw milling

I have a Craftsman 113 10” saw that I have had for about 5 years now and have made several upgrades to make it more usable but….... I have a hell of a time trying to tilt the blade to 45 deg. It starts out very stiff and need to get 2 hands and possibly a wrench if i’m feeling sluggish. When I get past 10 deg it gets very smooth till I get to 42 deg then gets very stiff again. I have cleaned the truniions numerous times and even made a graphite impregnated wax that is applied to all movable parts and it still doesn’t help. I don’t see why it is happening and hoping someone else has experienced it and corrected it.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”


4 replies so far

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ocean

172 posts in 1288 days


#1 posted 08-14-2019 01:55 PM

Is the side of your saw (where the tilt crank is located) bowing out or in when you are cranking up or down? Mine did the same thing and that was the problem, because the angle of the tilt rod needs to remain fixed on the cabinet side. Solution – remove the tilt rod and install and a piece of 3/4” ply wood to the inside of the cabinet to give it more rigidity. You will need a hole to remount the tilt rod. Screw it to the inside of the cabinet with sheet metal screws. Hope this helps solves your problem.

-- Bob, FL Keys

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scribble

212 posts in 2656 days


#2 posted 08-14-2019 03:06 PM



Is the side of your saw (where the tilt crank is located) bowing out or in when you are cranking up or down? Mine did the same thing and that was the problem, because the angle of the tilt rod needs to remain fixed on the cabinet side. Solution – remove the tilt rod and install and a piece of 3/4” ply wood to the inside of the cabinet to give it more rigidity. You will need a hole to remount the tilt rod. Screw it to the inside of the cabinet with sheet metal screws. Hope this helps solves your problem.

- ocean

Bob it does move a little bit so I will give that a try when I tear it down this weekend to go over everything thoroughly.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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ocean

172 posts in 1288 days


#3 posted 08-15-2019 04:04 PM

Something else to look at. The handle to lock the tilt needs to be in the down position as it can hit the table when tilting and prevent you from reaching 45 degrees. Additionally as I found out yesterday that the mount (that attaches to the rear trunnion) for the splitter/blade guard will contact the rotating mount of the blade and prevent a full 45 degrees. I have PALS to align the blade with table slot and it has a longer bolt that is the problem. It contacts the trunion as you tilt and prevents a full tilt. Some how I never had this problem until yesterday myself. I will say I rarely tilt my blade. I’m sure I had this happen before but because I rarely tilt that far so I just forgot.

-- Bob, FL Keys

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therealSteveN

3390 posts in 1029 days


#4 posted 08-15-2019 06:14 PM

Tilt lock as suggested will inhibit full motion, loosen, then move, retighten when you want to stay.

On any tilt question my mind usually just goes to all the wood dust, and whatever grease, wax or other, someone used to lube the gear movement years before, is now a super dust magnet. Degreasers are sometimes needed if it’s really packed on. There are times gears are found to be missing teeth, now that is some dust hard, and dirty to do that. Usually just blowing it out with an air gun (GOOGLES please) and using an old toothbrush. Dipped in Mineral Spirits really speeds this up, and the MS flashes off before you need to worry about it being adding something wet. Clean gears are happy, smooth moving gears. Relube with a DRY, preferably non silicone lube.

Silicone = bad if it gets to the wood, can affect finishes.

Dry is good because wet attracts more dust. A lot of folks use paste wax, I put this into the wet side of the equation.

I got pointed toward this stuff several years ago
It’s a bike lube for gears and chains, no sawdust out on the road, but plenty of dust, and this is a pretty much universal winner in that regard. The only caveat I will say on this, is it does go on wet, so put it on right before you close the shop for the day, or if you’ll not be back for a few days, probably better. I’ve never timed it, but it dries fairly quick to a harder dry wax like feel. Once dry, your dust won’t stick, and it is a great lube. Many use WD40, but it isn’t supposed to be a lube, as are many of the other things you hear used. This is definitely a lube, and your gears will move briskly using it.

Still the bottom line is dust is like water, sooner or later it will win against anything. I put aside 2 trips a year to the shop for maintenance. One each Fall, and one each Spring. Everything gets lubed, waxed and pampered so it can keep fighting the good fight for me.

-- Think safe, be safe

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