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Advice on 8" Jointer

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Forum topic by RPhillips posted 08-14-2019 02:56 AM 683 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RPhillips

1279 posts in 2291 days


08-14-2019 02:56 AM

I’m hoping to get some feedback from the LJ community before I commit to the purchase of a jointer. I was looking this jointer from Grizzly, the G0858 which is the parallelgram bed with a 8” helical cutter. This will be my first jointer, so no prior experience with one. Is this overkill? would I just be better spending a lot less and getting a G0814? I’m only a hobbiest and really still building my shop.

Appreciate your feedback.

Thanks.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...


32 replies so far

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therealSteveN

3390 posts in 1029 days


#1 posted 08-14-2019 03:30 AM

I’ve got the same platform as the GO858, but it’s the previous model number. I love it. It does exactly what you would expect an 8” jointer to do, with a lot less fuss than I had with non parallegram beds, and for my money the argument that a heli head on a Jointer is a bad thing, which some seem to have isn’t valid. For the same exact reasons you get one on a planer, it does the same for the jointer. Awesome finish, no longer do I have to trick it to get clean, non broken out grain on difficult woods, and if I should nick a nail, or hard knot I can spin the cutter affected and be back at it a lot quicker than with straight knives. Cheaper too.

Now I can’t for the world say if it is the right tool for you though. Starting out I believe most start with a 6” basic tool, which can be gotten used for considerably less $$$$$ Also since I have purchased mine, this entire Cutech line didn’t exist. I have to seriously wonder if I would have gotten mine? Actually I haven’t seen enough feedback about them to make much of a thought, except they don’t cost much for an 8” Jointer. Shorter beds to be sure, but much of that is just technique, or you are routinely working with very long stock, which I am not.

Maybe talk a little about what you want to do? That would give others a base of info to make better suggestions.

-- Think safe, be safe

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WoodenDreams

679 posts in 366 days


#2 posted 08-14-2019 03:38 AM

I think you’ll just be settling for price instead of satisfaction. There’s a nice difference between a 48” top and a jointer that’s 72” or longer. If your have the budget and have room for a larger jointer, go for it. In the long run you’ll appreciate it. especially if you continue woodworking.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1646 posts in 1949 days


#3 posted 08-14-2019 06:52 AM

Hmm, must have jointer disease going around? This makes the 3rd thread in last 3 weeks asking advice on size of jointer needed in shop? Seems redundant to post same joiner info here.
Read:
https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/305598
https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/305644

All I will add here is:
1) Buy what you need for projects you intend to build.
If you can’t afford brand spanking new jointer in the size your projects need, then look at used. Not much can go wrong with jointer, if tables are flat.

2) IMHO – Most people need a 12” jointer if they handle 8-12” rough lumber; but settle for 6-8”due cost/size/power trade off on large tools. Only you can set criteria for your shop equipment compromise.

3) If you can’t decide, start small and cheap with used 6” model. Conventional 6” models sell used for $150-350 on CL constantly in Arizona. There were more than 5 to chose from listed when I looked the other day. Can typically resale the used 6” jointer for about same as paid, assuming you don’t break anything. Buying a used 6” jointer and breaking even on resale 6 months later is much less expensive learning experience, then buying a new 6” tool that depreciates 50% on first use.

Best Luck on your decision.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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controlfreak

112 posts in 56 days


#4 posted 08-14-2019 10:34 AM

I agree with CaptainKlutz. I have a 6” that I paid $150 for. I have had fun figuring out how to change and set the blade height. After cleaning, new blades and replacing a broken power switch I think I can get $200+ when the time comes. I am happy to have it and be able to work on new projects. It also left me with extra $$ to spend on a planer. A used planer at a reasonable discount is something I just could not find locally. Everytime I found one by the time I figured in replacing the blades it was within $50 of what a new unit would cost.

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RPhillips

1279 posts in 2291 days


#5 posted 08-14-2019 11:57 AM

Thanks for the feedback. CL here in IN is doesn’t see much in terms of quality woodworking tools, mostly constructions stuff and something worthy does appear the seller assumes it’s an heirloom as the prices are usually on the high side.

As for what I want to do in my shop? Everything and Anything. I want to make furniture at some point (sooner than later) and then maybe look into what things that I may be able to market to make money for more tools.

I’m moving from a one car garage shop to a much larger 2 car (25×25) shop this weekend. I do plan to keep everything mobile so that I can move things around as I see fit or if I need to pull a vehicle in for repairs.

I just bought a DW735 (to replace a lunch box) and I thought a jointer would be the next logical choice so I can properly surface all my own wood.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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controlfreak

112 posts in 56 days


#6 posted 08-14-2019 12:45 PM


I just bought a DW735 (to replace a lunch box) and I thought a jointer would be the next logical choice so I can properly surface all my own wood.

- RPhillips


I found the jointer in the local paper want ads. I don’t think anybody gets the paper anymore which is why I probably got it. I have since cancelled the paper because it was almost $400 a year. I do check online on Fridays sometimes to see what is for sale. I guess we are backwards, I got the jointer first and the 735 this week but haven’t had time to fire it up. In the end I decided I would need both to get a good edge to laminate boards together to make a benchtop, legs, cutting boards etc. Good luck in your search for a jointer.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

825 posts in 3248 days


#7 posted 08-14-2019 01:15 PM

If you can afford it, buy the 8”. You won’t wish you had bought a 6”.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2385 posts in 2253 days


#8 posted 08-14-2019 03:22 PM

Rob avoid putting your jointer on wheels if you can. The difference between a jointer that’s make straight flat edges and one that doesn’t is small.
It’s too tempting to move around a jointer on wheels from the ends of the tables.
A helical Head is fixed no adjustments. Some think it’s great I don’t like them on a jointer.
Planer yes jointer no.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Pixxture's profile

Pixxture

24 posts in 526 days


#9 posted 08-14-2019 03:58 PM

Agree with ibewjohn
I bought a 6” grizzly sure wish i had bought an 8”. Longer bed and wider boards would be easier to handle.

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controlfreak

112 posts in 56 days


#10 posted 08-14-2019 04:13 PM

Bigger is always better unless you have a 10’x16’ shop like me. Wheels on my jointer are a must have. All four are locking and wheels have not been a problem so far. I have a lot of storage projects in my future.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5648 posts in 2948 days


#11 posted 08-14-2019 04:38 PM


A helical Head is fixed no adjustments. Some think it’s great I don’t like them on a jointer.

- Aj2

To me that’s one of the greatest reasons to switch to the helical (the fixed part). Trying to set jointer knives can be a colossal PITA. With the helical head you don’t worry about aligning the cutters, they are precisely machined to be in plane. The only adjustment might be after installing it and you adjust your tables to the cutter height.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View coxhaus's profile

coxhaus

140 posts in 1349 days


#12 posted 08-14-2019 05:01 PM

If I had a bigger shop then I would have an 8 inch jointer, but with the size of my shop a long bed 6 inch is the best I can do. I am also only a hobbyist.

I am perfectly happy with the cheaper straight knives on my jointer.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2385 posts in 2253 days


#13 posted 08-14-2019 05:02 PM


A helical Head is fixed no adjustments. Some think it’s great I don’t like them on a jointer.

- Aj2

To me that s one of the greatest reasons to switch to the helical (the fixed part). Trying to set jointer knives can be a colossal PITA. With the helical head you don t worry about aligning the cutters, they are precisely machined to be in plane. The only adjustment might be after installing it and you adjust your tables to the cutter height.

- Fred Hargis

Ok Fred if you say so. I would rather start a project with sharp knives. I guess everyone had to earn the skill of setting knives. The more you do it the easier it gets . I also appreciate a sharp Handplane and chisel.
Is there no time to learn?
Good Luck Fred Hargis

-- Aj

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farmfromkansas

101 posts in 69 days


#14 posted 08-14-2019 05:20 PM

I taught wood shop 45 years ago in a shop that had a Powermatic 8” jointer, which had a blade setting jig, that you just set on the table and it had a gauge, and the cutterhead had a set screw adjustment, and you just turned the set screw till it was the same on the gauge for all the blades, and the jointer cut perfectly. Why does not someone sell a copy of that gauge? It came with the Powermatic. Now I have a helical cutterhead so I don’t have to monkey around with blades, as it is not easy like those on the Powermatic.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

112 posts in 56 days


#15 posted 08-14-2019 06:54 PM

I got a gauge with a magbase from HF and quickly realized the arms that hold the gauge were too wobbly for me and it would topple over if the mag was turned off. I can’t remember the smart fella’s name here on LJ but he turned me on to making a dial gauge holder out of a 123 block. I fixed my problem and I don’t find setting jointer knives a pain in the least anymore.

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