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Using a 45 degree router bit

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Forum topic by woodthaticould posted 08-11-2019 08:47 PM 689 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodthaticould

79 posts in 3133 days


08-11-2019 08:47 PM

I’m looking forward to working on the hope chest project I recently asked a question about.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/305737

There are several places in the project where I will be using a 45 degree bevel router bit. I will be cutting the bevels on the edges (not ends) of boards about 3 1/2” wide and 24” long. I’m guessing that this will be, for a rank beginner like me, a better method for making accurate bevel cuts than using the table saw.

I am sure that I’m overlooking something regarding this idea.


15 replies so far

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Rich

5693 posts in 1395 days


#1 posted 08-11-2019 09:27 PM

Just take the material off in multiple passes on the router table.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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woodthaticould

79 posts in 3133 days


#2 posted 08-11-2019 09:50 PM

Sorry, I overlooked the obvious for some crazy reason.

I assume by the way that I should fine tune the bevel cut by changing the height of the router bit until I get the sharp corner I’m looking for.

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Rich

5693 posts in 1395 days


#3 posted 08-11-2019 10:04 PM

Either way. Adjust the bit height or move the fence back. I usually get the fence set and raise the bit. When you get close, just start creeping up on it.

Also, and you probably already figured this out, do all of your boards at each height. However, when you get close enough to finish it in one pass, you can creep up on the final cut using one board, and then run the rest.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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woodthaticould

79 posts in 3133 days


#4 posted 08-11-2019 11:00 PM

Thanks very much Rich. As I said, I am a beginner in making things out of wood. But I drew a lot of woodwork when I was young and every now and then I designed something.

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jerryminer

960 posts in 2247 days


#5 posted 08-11-2019 11:08 PM

Trying to cut an edge to a sharp point with a router can be challenging because you lose your reference edge when you make the cut all the way to a point.

For a 24” long work piece, I would attach (with double-stick tape , or hot glue, or brads,...) a sacrificial board as a reference edge. Then you can even slightly over-cut your bevel without losing your reference edge. (Very easy to get some snipe at the end of the piece if you rout away all the edge)

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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SMP

2251 posts in 711 days


#6 posted 08-11-2019 11:48 PM

I’ve done them on router table and table saw. You already got good advice. But i’ll add to make sure you keep down pressure on the boards. I’m guessing you don’t have a feeder. Don’t assume boards are flat.

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FirehouseWoodworking

778 posts in 4079 days


#7 posted 08-12-2019 12:32 AM

If you have the ability to do so, here’s a trick to avoid losing the reference edge on your boards.

If possible, start with boards that are WIDER than your finished measurement. Then take one edge down to your desired 45 degrees. As has already been pointed out, take multiple, light passes (either by raising the bit or moving the fence) and holding the board tight to the table.

Once you have the desired “knife edge” at the 45, then set your fence to the final width (plus a little, but not too much) and cut the boards to width on your table saw. Then plane that cut edge down to the exact final width on your jointer or with a hand plane if you don’t have a jointer.

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

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Lazyman

5657 posts in 2193 days


#8 posted 08-12-2019 01:06 AM

Already some good info above. Since you say that you are a beginner, I’ll mention that you need to make sure that you move the router in the correct direction.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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woodthaticould

79 posts in 3133 days


#9 posted 08-12-2019 01:49 AM

Thanks everybody. With all this good advice I might actually do this right.

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fly2low

88 posts in 902 days


#10 posted 08-12-2019 03:07 AM

I was recently doing some raised panels on the router table, and was having a very difficult time getting a smooth consistent cut. I was conscious of keeping downward pressure, but was obviously not consistent.
Got a set of these – problem solved

https://jessem.com/collections/router-table-accessories/products/clear-cut-stock-guides

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

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woodthaticould

79 posts in 3133 days


#11 posted 08-12-2019 03:24 AM

I saw them in an online tutorial and wrote them on my to buy list. Are they as good a product as they appear?

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fly2low

88 posts in 902 days


#12 posted 08-12-2019 04:35 AM

They solved my problem
I am happy wth them. Have the set for the TS as well. No affiliation, just a happy customer

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

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jerryminer

960 posts in 2247 days


#13 posted 08-12-2019 03:12 PM



I saw them in an online tutorial and wrote them on my to buy list. Are they as good a product as they appear?

- woodthaticould

I have them and love them. Not quite a power feeder, but a close second

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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pottz

10339 posts in 1790 days


#14 posted 08-12-2019 03:16 PM


I saw them in an online tutorial and wrote them on my to buy list. Are they as good a product as they appear?

- woodthaticould

I have them and love them. Not quite a power feeder, but a close second

- jerryminer


ill second that they work great and very well made.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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woodthaticould

79 posts in 3133 days


#15 posted 08-13-2019 05:17 PM

Thanks everybody.

The 45 degree router bit hasn’t arrived yet but I just received the Yonico bits that I ordered for all the tongue and groove joints on this project. Nice packaging by the way, a finger jointed box.

They are, for a new guy like me, pretty scary looking. I think I’ll be ordering the Jessem guides now instead of later.

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