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Forum topic by wilschroter posted 08-06-2019 03:11 PM 830 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wilschroter

111 posts in 1084 days


08-06-2019 03:11 PM

I’m looking to remove my old deck made out of 2×6 pressure treated wood and replace it with a new deck using porcelain tiles over 3/4” plywood.

The underside of the deck will be completely covered with a combination of a newly poured concrete wall (above the water line) and 2×6 framing with plywood, Tyvek, and stucco (top layer) around it.

My question is above all of that. I just need help with what materials I need to use on the floor.

I’d like to put a porcelain tile over 3/4” OSB T&G plywood which will then sit atop pressure-treated 2×12’s for the frame. Is that all I need or is there any sort of vapor/water barrier material in between there? Also, given that the porcelain tile will be somewhat “sealed” can I get away with the T&G OSB (I have 12 sheets on hand) or do I need to move into some other product?

I don’t imagine the 3/4” OSB will see any moisture, but I want to be 1000% sure.


10 replies so far

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ArtMann

1446 posts in 1375 days


#1 posted 08-08-2019 02:09 AM

Perhaps I don’t understand the situation but based on my understanding of what you are planning to do, I think you are about to create a colossal disaster. The only way I would use tile on a deck is if the base were concrete. You will not be able to prevent water from seeping through the tile and getting into the OSB. When that happens, it will swell and buckle and the tiles will turn loose. I won’t use tile directly over OSB on the inside of a house. I put down a cement board base (Durock) first.

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bruc101

1373 posts in 4101 days


#2 posted 08-08-2019 02:46 AM

.


Perhaps I don t understand the situation but based on my understanding of what you are planning to do, I think you are about to create a colossal disaster. The only way I would use tile on a deck is if the base were concrete. You will not be able to prevent water from seeping through the tile and getting into the OSB. When that happens, it will swell and buckle and the tiles will turn loose. I won t use tile directly over OSB on the inside of a house. I put down a cement board base (Durock) first.

- ArtMann

Spot on.

-- Bruce Free Plans https://traditionalwoodworking.org

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wilschroter

111 posts in 1084 days


#3 posted 08-08-2019 10:20 AM

@ArtMann @bruc101 – That’s exactly what I was missing – the cement board. I knew it didn’t make any sense! OK so here’s my stack based on what you’re saying:

- 3/8” Porcelain tile
- 1/2” Durock
- 3/4” OSB Plywood

.. my understanding is that I want something like Redgard in there as well. If I wanted to be EXTRA careful would there be any additional precautions you’d take?

View Baddad84's profile

Baddad84

23 posts in 1441 days


#4 posted 08-08-2019 10:44 AM

Don’t do it! Bought a house in The arid West Texas desert and had to replace the second story tiled deck. $16,000 and a lawsuit for non disclosure. You just can’t beat mother nature. You will get water trapped under the tile. If you decide to ignore the advice you are getting then I would slope it enough so the water can’t sit on the grout.

-- Brad

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wilschroter

111 posts in 1084 days


#5 posted 08-08-2019 11:54 AM

@baddad84 the plan was to absolutely slope it like a shower so that water could run off. Also, half of it is covered but we’re in Ohio where we get a ton of snow. Was yours not sloped?

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1014 posts in 1110 days


#6 posted 08-08-2019 12:35 PM

I’m with everyone else. I’ve never seen a tiled deck that worked out long term. They are beautiful when they are new but always have to be redone. I’m not fully understanding how you intend to make this deck but if you could do it all with concrete instead of wood I think it would be better. They are doing some great things with dyed and stamped concrete anymore so personally I’d suggest going that route or just redoing the deck that you have (probably the cheapest option)

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

598 posts in 1178 days


#7 posted 08-08-2019 05:30 PM

I would NEVER put tile outdoors in Ohio. Snow melts, water gets into the grout and under the tile, it freezes, and everything breaks. I have tile over concrete in Pueblo, CO and I see it happen.

-- Sawdust Maker

View pottz's profile

pottz

7003 posts in 1543 days


#8 posted 08-08-2019 05:42 PM



Perhaps I don t understand the situation but based on my understanding of what you are planning to do, I think you are about to create a colossal disaster. The only way I would use tile on a deck is if the base were concrete. You will not be able to prevent water from seeping through the tile and getting into the OSB. When that happens, it will swell and buckle and the tiles will turn loose. I won t use tile directly over OSB on the inside of a house. I put down a cement board base (Durock) first.

- ArtMann


+1 i agree 100 percent your looking for a big pita,tile over a plywood deck spells lot of money wasted,dont do it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Scooter123's profile

Scooter123

4 posts in 120 days


#9 posted 08-08-2019 06:15 PM

I’m a SoCal tile guy, and would probably refrain from tile in a freezing climate, but if you wanted to try it, I would treat the area like a shower to aggressively slope and remove moisture.

The materials I would use top to bottom would be:

Water resistant tile, epoxy grout (sloped at least 1/16th to the foot)
Sloped mud substrate-setting bed, very porous.
PVC, Hot Mop, or Schulter Membrane, sloped to weep holes
Mud preslope 16th to the foot at least
Framing, dimensional lumber (cedar, redwood) and exterior grade plywood coated with Redguard

-- Regards, Tom

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

111 posts in 1084 days


#10 posted 08-08-2019 06:18 PM

@scooter123 that’s a really helpful suggestion. I’m aware that this could be a debacle, and it’s a fairly big area (500 sq ft or more). If it goes sideways, I’ve got a lot of area to re-cover.

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