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Forum topic by Floyd Hall posted 08-05-2019 02:50 AM 557 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Floyd Hall

167 posts in 751 days


08-05-2019 02:50 AM

Hello folks,

I have several things going on right now as I try to turn the corner and get my shop together, so forgive my multiple posts.

Right now I’m working on a compressor I inherited. I’ve had it a couple years, but haven’t really used it much. Now i built a station for it, so I figured I’d clean it up and get it in good order. When I went to change the oil and drain any condensation, I found there was about half a cup of nasty rust water in the tanks. I drained it but the drain cocks were loaded with sediment, so I decided just to strip it down, clean all the fittings and maybe upgrade a few.

Anyway, it’s an Ingersoll-Rand DD2T2, a 2 hp/14.5 amp/4.5 gal. compressor. It’s about 10 years old and IR no longer provides much support for it. I bought a 3/8i Goodyear hose, a few Milton fittings and I’m ready to put it back together again.

My question is whether I should spring for an oiler for it. I don’t have any plans to use it for anything other than than blowing things out and using it with a Hitachi 23g pinner, a Bostitch 18g nailer and a Bostitch 18g narrow crown stapler. Should I spring for an oiler or not? Is it worth it or should I just oil each tool as I use them?

Floyd


27 replies so far

View mtnwalton's profile

mtnwalton

58 posts in 1507 days


#1 posted 08-05-2019 03:05 AM

Maybe more important to get an inline air cleaner or dryer. I would add a couple drops of oil into any air tool before and after use. I’ll be looking for responses too ; getting ready to run a black pipe run from the compressor to an air line reel for over my assy bench. Good luck

View squazo's profile

squazo

131 posts in 2126 days


#2 posted 08-05-2019 11:37 AM

I just the oil the tools as they need it, maybe a drop once or twice a week. Sometimes more.

At my job we do the same thing.

an oiler will contaminate your hoses and make them useless for spraying finish.

If you are planning on blowing things out do yourself a favor and get one of these

https://www.miltonindustries.com/f-r-l-modular-osha-lockout-3-way-valve-1-2.html

lots of brands out there thats just the first one google came up with.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1336 posts in 386 days


#3 posted 08-05-2019 03:58 PM

Some of my tools are oil free. I like finsh nailers that are oil free, for fine work you don’t want a blast of oil on your fine detail work, or walls of your house, or your eyes etc. The rest I just drop in with a small bottle with dropper lid. I agree on spending the money on a moisture seperator instead.

View Bill1974's profile

Bill1974

132 posts in 3466 days


#4 posted 08-05-2019 06:56 PM

I second what others have said, better to keep oil out of the woodworking area. Unless you are using 1000’s of nails monthly I would add a few drops of oil to the tools occasionally (monthly at most). A filter or filters to catch water and oil would also be a good idea. No sense in blowing off dust just to spray on oil and/or water.

If you use mechanics tools oil them as needed depending on their use. Or plumb a line that has an oiler for those tools to use and make sure to not use a hose that was oiled on the clean line.

If you plumb lines and are worried about rust, use copper, brass, or plastic that is approved for compressed air (don’t use PVC, PEX should be okay, but of it is not intended to be used for compressed air)

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WoodenDreams

707 posts in 391 days


#5 posted 08-05-2019 06:59 PM

I wouldn’t put oil in your air compressor tank. You’ll end up spraying some oil residue onto your wood, then possible have finishing problems. What I used to do in air line systems is have a ‘Air Dryer’ installed in the line between the compressor and air tank. This is the same method semi-truck use in their air system to keep out moisture, and it works rather well. the compressor In my shop I don’t use very often, so I just drain it every six months. There is ‘Air Line Antifreeze’ available in quart size containers that you can buy at truckstops, truck dealerships, and auto part stores.

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

167 posts in 751 days


#6 posted 08-06-2019 04:19 AM

Thanks all. I’ll look into the air dryer, which I gather is the same as the moisture separator. And that blower looks like a good deal.

Floyd

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WoodenDreams

707 posts in 391 days


#7 posted 08-06-2019 07:50 PM

A water separator will help leave moisture in a glass bowl which you still have to drain once and awhile, A air dryer will remove moisture (not separate moisture).

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

167 posts in 751 days


#8 posted 08-10-2019 08:01 AM

One last question. I’ve changed the oil, reconfigured it a bit and fired it back up. I’ve been checking it regularly to see how well the system has been holding air. The first three times I checked, the PSI was where I had set it—around 120. But the last time I checked it was down quite a bit to around 90. Anyway, I ran it back up to 120 and unplugged it. I’ll go back tomorrow and check to see if it is holding air.

So here’s the question—how much air does a compressor typically lose over 24 hours? I think I got it back together properly being careful with the teflon tape, but one of the drainage valves on the back of the tank did not go all the way back in. Like I said, I drained some pretty nasty water out of this thing and sediment got into the valves. I soaked them in Evaporust and Mineral Spirits for several days and thought they were clean. Maybe I just need to reclean the threads and replace the valves.

Also, I’ve been having a lot of trouble turning the regulator knob and have been thinking about replacing it.

Any thoughts?

Floyd

View Robert's profile

Robert

3516 posts in 1961 days


#9 posted 08-10-2019 01:20 PM

Use a soapy water spray and check all the fittings especially any quick connects.

If there are no leaks, the only thing it can be is the compressor leaking back.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

167 posts in 751 days


#10 posted 08-10-2019 08:10 PM



Use a soapy water spray and check all the fittings especially any quick connects.

If there are no leaks, the only thing it can be is the compressor leaking back.

- Robert

Checked it this morning and it was down from 120 to about 90 PSI, so I’ll do the soapy water thing. What does “leaking back” mean—“leaking in back?”

Floyd

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

167 posts in 751 days


#11 posted 08-11-2019 04:09 AM

Did the soapy water and found the leak. It was one of the drainage valves in back—the one I couldn’t get all the way in. Not a bad leak, but it will have to be replaced. The rest seemed fine.

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

167 posts in 751 days


#12 posted 08-15-2019 01:20 AM

Okay folks,

I’e replaced and/or cleaned up most of the fittings/hoses and now I’m down to selecting a regulator. The one I have is all but frozen and I want something that’s easily adjustable for my small collection of pinner/nailers. Based on the advice here and elsewhere, I’ve decided to forgo the in-line oiler and drier, but Klutch has a regulator-air filter unit that’s pretty affordable. The comparable IR, by comparison, is too expensive.

Would it be a good idea to buy the Klutch regulator-air filter? I’m concerned, given what I’ve seen in the water coming out of the tanks, that there might be a fair amount of rust and sludge developing in the tanks. I’d like to stop it from getting to the nailers.

Floyd

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Floyd Hall

167 posts in 751 days


#13 posted 08-17-2019 03:20 AM

Okay, decision’s been made. I’m just going to replace with regulator with a good quality regulator and leave the rest for later—like if I ever get into spray finishing. As I understand it, at least one of these filters—the moisture separator I believe—has to be set up well away from the compressor. And you want to install them as individual units anyway, as opposed to in-line units. That way you can replace them as they break rather than having one component break and you have to replace all of them at once.

Thanks all. I appreciate the help.

Floyd

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

167 posts in 751 days


#14 posted 09-12-2019 01:38 AM

Okay. I got the thing back together and found I was losing pressure overnight—about 25 pounds worth. So I got some soapy water out and went over every joint. Like I said, I decided to forego the filter/oiler/moisture separator and go for a good quality regulator—a Milton—with all new fittings, again mostly Milton.

The set up now has one coupler attached to a hose to the compressor and everything after that on a board—the new regulator, a ball valve cutoff and two couplers so I can run two different nail guns at the same time or a combination gun and blower.

The problem? Of the maybe 14-15 connecting points together with the two new drainage valves on the tanks in back, I have 4-5 leaks. Is there something better than teflon tape for this? All these fittings are brass and I paid a fair amount for them. I was pretty careful putting them in and was expecting better. The drainage valves meanwhile are a separate problem. I replaced both of the with Milton T-style ball valves, but the threads in the two ‘wiener tanks’ had a fair amount of corrosion on the inside. I did the best I could to clean them out over several days, but both leak. I’m pretty sure I can fix the problems along the line, but these two drainage valves look like they’ll require me to re-tap the threads if I want the leaks to stop.

So is this worth it or should I just turn it off when not in use? Is there a better material to use in these joints other than standard teflon tape? Or is there some other material I can coat the outside of the joints with rather than taking the offending joints apart, putting new tape on and putting them back together?

Floyd

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1762 posts in 1975 days


#15 posted 09-12-2019 07:48 AM

Teflon tape doesn’t really ‘seal’ threads, it is lubricant to stop dissimilar materials from bonding due corrosion. The taper of NPT threads is supposed to create the seal. If the threads are pitted with rust, that needs to be cleaned up.

Try pipe sealant or pipe dope on your compressed air fittings. I use Rectorseal #5, as it’s available from HD. Always put dope on only male thread, not inside the female thread. You don’t want to push carp into lines, and have it blowing through the lines under pressure.

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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