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DeWalt DW 735 planer question

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Forum topic by dbw posted 08-04-2019 07:56 PM 640 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dbw

303 posts in 2112 days


08-04-2019 07:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dw735 planer snipe helical

I have a DW735 with the original factory knives. They are getting dull and I am thinking of replacing them with carbide tipped knives or a Shelix cutter head. I am not a fan of this planer because it will snipe every time. I have done everything I know to do to make the snyping problem go away. I even installed a 4’ long melamine board across the table so I could have extended infeed/outfeed tables. Here is my question: if I replace the knives with a helical cutter head or carbide knives will the snipe problem go away? I’m also toying with the idea of replacing the planer with a floor standing 15” planer such as a Jet 15BHH or a Grizzly G053Z. Will using a “real” planer make the snyping go away? BTW the most material I every remove is 1/4 turn of the hand wheel.

-- measure 3 times, cut once


20 replies so far

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3574 posts in 1050 days


#1 posted 08-04-2019 08:25 PM

I’ve had 7 of them since they started making them. I’ve put the stock in, and out feed tables on all of them, and have never had a snipe problem. UNLESS I am trying to run through wood much too long for the support the tables give, and the ends are flipping up due to weight. IOW it’s acting like I don’t have the tables there, because the board is silly long for the machine.

It’s entirely caused by in and outfeed pressures. Put too much sag on the infed piece, and it snipes the exit of the start of the board. Not enough support on the exit side of the piece, and it snipes the tail as it is thrust up going out.

Depth of cut could be a cause if you are trying to hog off wood with it. I’ve always found on boards up to 8’ in length the in, and out feed tables work well, and cut quality is great if I take small amounts off. Try to hog off wood, a lot of problems occur.

Plus they do NOT suffer poor blades very well at all. Cut quality goes to ….........

-- Think safe, be safe

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2420 posts in 2274 days


#2 posted 08-04-2019 08:35 PM

I vote for carbide tipped knives over the insert head. They can be resharpened.
I used to flatin one side before I planed it when I had a 735 . My PM 15hh snipes more then the 735 ever did.
I sold it with the infinity knifes in it. It’s a good straight knife machine.
Good luck

-- Aj

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4135 posts in 2464 days


#3 posted 08-04-2019 09:01 PM

I run boards and to end thru my DW735 to completely eliminate snipe and will even use scrap boards before and after. I also did some trials with the infeed and out feed tables and reduced it a lot. I always get some snipe feeding 3 ft long boards by themselves. Even with the best setup still a small amount measurable with a caliper.

You will still get some snipe with a 15” 3 hp planer. You can adjust infeed and out feed along with the pressure and bottom rolls and still be able to measure a small snipe. I am certain some will say that they have zero snipe

The person who solves the snipe problem could get rich. How many people would buy a snipe free planer?

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

814 posts in 1578 days


#4 posted 08-04-2019 09:44 PM

I have had the 734 for several years and it is usually very good about not sniping. I thought that the 735 was equally as good. As therealsteveN said, the only time I have to watch out is with long planks. Then I usually will just put some upward pressure on the opposite end of the board on entry and exit. The best solution to totally eliminate the snipe is, as redoak said, run some scrap through along with your board, both at the entry and exit. To make this easy for long boards, I frequently hot melt glue some narrow strips of equal thickness to the edges so they extend beyond the work piece about 6” on both ends.

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

1739 posts in 1970 days


#5 posted 08-04-2019 09:51 PM

Hmm..

#1 – How much snipe?
If you have 0.001” of difference, then it’s no big deal. Couple swipes with 120 grit paper and it was never there.
If you have 0.005-0.010” of snipe, then machine is not set up properly.
All machines are capable of being set up for minimal, if not zero snipe.

#2 – Where is snipe happening; leading or trailing edge?
Leading edge snipe is 100% due poor machine set up for lumber being planed. If only long baords show leading edge snipe, then it should be obvious; the in-feed table is too short, or not set up properly.
Trailing edge snip is much harder to control. 100% of the machines I have used generate trailing edge snip in certain conditions. Many machines can be configured to reduce this to zero, but not in all conditions.

I’ve owned 2 different lunch box planers, and 4 different 15” four post industrial planers. They all generate some snipe, but with proper set up it can be minimized. Can usually set up machine so that short boards have zero to 0.002” of exit snipe. For longer boards, the challenge is having in-feed and out-feed tables long enough to prevent the weight of lumber lifting the head or tail of board into the cutter head.

The challenge with controlling snipe, is that you will often need different machine settings for different types of lumber.
- Rough lumber needs more feed roller pressure to ensure consistent feed rates. Dirty rubber coated rollers also need higher feed pressures. Planers are often set up with in-feed roller being lower than the out-feed roller (relative to cutter head) to help with consistent feed rates. But when high pressure on in-feed roller is released as the board finishes, the end attempts to lift and creates trailing edge snipe. Can reduce this tendency with slight lift on end of your out-feed extension tables, but it changes based on length of board and is not a perfect fix. If you set the feed rollers to same height, rough lumber often has feeding issues. These things are why trailing edge snipe is hardest to eliminate.

Buying an industrial 15” planer will not remove snipe. Have never seen a 15” planer with zero snipe in all conditions. If anything, industrial planers have more adjustments and you see snipe MORE often than when using a properly set up lunch box planer.

Worse, Industrial 15 & 20” four post planers uses a serrated in-feed roller, and in-feed roller pressure causes marking when trying to remove small thickness amounts. The marking is 0.0008 or less, but it is there, and needs to be planed/sanded to remove.

Suggest you investigate some machine adjustments, and maybe realize that absolute zero trailing edge snipe is very hard to achieve.

Hope this helps.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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dbw

303 posts in 2112 days


#6 posted 08-04-2019 10:32 PM

I get +/- .015” on infeed and outfeed. This occurs whether the board is 12” long or 5’ long. I have a 4’ long melamine board balanced on the planer table so the in and out are approx. the same length. I use roller stands for longer boards. I hold the board at an angle on both infeed and outfeed to keep the board from popping up and hitting the cutter head at the ends. I am to the point where I will GLADLY spend however much it takes to make this frustration go away. I’m not crazy about hot gluing scraps to the ends. This adds to the complexity and appears to be time consuming.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

142 posts in 1309 days


#7 posted 08-04-2019 10:42 PM

I have had mine since 2010 and the only time I get snipe is with a long board that is not properly supported. I put in a Shelix head about 5 yrs ago and no snipe, again as long I am paying attention and support the board.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1346 posts in 2428 days


#8 posted 08-04-2019 11:12 PM



I get +/- .015” on infeed and outfeed. This occurs whether the board is 12” long or 5 long. I have a 4 long melamine board balanced on the planer table so the in and out are approx. the same length. I use roller stands for longer boards. I hold the board at an angle on both infeed and outfeed to keep the board from popping up and hitting the cutter head at the ends. I am to the point where I will GLADLY spend however much it takes to make this frustration go away. I m not crazy about hot gluing scraps to the ends. This adds to the complexity and appears to be time consuming.

- dbw

I can’t add much in the way of technique, set-up, etc. to solve your problem. I occasionally get some snipe with my 735, but it always seems to be the result of not supporting the board well as it goes through the planer. If I am more careful on the next pass all is well.

Carbide knives will not change anything. I sincerely doubt that a shelix type head will be a panacea either.

You will “GLADLY” spend “however much it takes” to make this problem go away. List the planer on Craigslist for a fair price and it will be snapped up in a heartbeat and go to a new home. The problem will be gone.

I am not certain just how much money is required to purchase a planer that never creates snipe, but I can well imagine that it is much more than the cost of a 735.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2420 posts in 2274 days


#9 posted 08-04-2019 11:41 PM

Dwb try taking out your stock knives and sharpening them. I remember my Dewalt sniped less after the knives were sharpened several times .
This will also shrink the cutting circle it’s just about the only thing you can do to change the way the 735 cuts.
Then you’ll know if carbide straight knives are worth the investment. I do for sure.
Here’s a simple jig. The slots are cut at 45 it’s the bevel angle on oem knives.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

814 posts in 1578 days


#10 posted 08-05-2019 01:26 AM

I m not crazy about hot gluing scraps to the ends. This adds to the complexity and appears to be time consuming.

- dbw


It does, in fact, add complexity and time to your work. I usually only do this if the board I’m planing does not have any excess length that can be wasted if I do get some snipe. It is the only way I know to be 100% certain of preventing it. However, it appears you may have some adjustment issues.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2906 posts in 4008 days


#11 posted 08-05-2019 01:49 PM

Original knives can be rotated, they are double edged.

Maybe a planer sled is what you need?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOzRB30gxpE

-- Genghis Khan and his brother Don, couldn't keep on keeping on...

View dbw's profile

dbw

303 posts in 2112 days


#12 posted 08-05-2019 03:27 PM


Original knives can be rotated, they are double edged.

Maybe a planer sled is what you need?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOzRB30gxpE

- hairy

I rotated the knives already. I have built and am using a sled. No change. Is it possible there is something wrong with this planer? I purchased it used in 2014.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

133 posts in 77 days


#13 posted 08-05-2019 03:41 PM

My DW735 comes tomorrow and will run some boards through this week to test. I may set up a camera to see how Amazon gets this 93 lb. beast onto my porch. God I hope they don’t drop it.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2420 posts in 2274 days


#14 posted 08-05-2019 03:56 PM

I rotated the knives already. I have built and am using a sled. No change. Is it possible there is something wrong with this planer? I purchased it used in 2014.

- dbw

There’s nothing wrong with your planer.
Some of the 735 snipe some don’t.
But that what we would expect from a machine that’s plug and play. If you want a planer that you can fine tune to suit your need your going to have to go up the ladder of woodworking machines.
But get ready to spend money and time wrenching and testing.
The whole point of the bench top machine with self setting knives is that you don’t have to do that.
I really like the 735 for it could take a very fine cut. Something my pm could not do .
The bryd head leaves a lot to be desired as finish planer.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11749 posts in 3904 days


#15 posted 08-05-2019 04:33 PM

I raised the outfeed table a tiny bit and use roller stands in and out for longer boards. Installed the Byrd Shelix about a year ago. Couldn’t be happier. BIG difference.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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