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Jointer snipe?

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Forum topic by controlfreak posted 08-03-2019 07:23 PM 730 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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controlfreak

149 posts in 85 days


08-03-2019 07:23 PM

I have my knives on my 6 1/8” Jointer set to 1/16th above the outfeed table but I am getting a 1/16” depressed area at the last 1 1/2 of the pass. I am keeping my downward pressure concentrated on the outfeed table, It just doesn’t make sense the at the very end of the cut the wood would dip further into the blades. The 1960’s craftsman manual say that indicates the blades are too high however flush with the outfeed is really the only way left to go. The rest of the board is perfect and only the last part that is about as long as the total cutter head is cut deeper. I hate to take the the knives all down only to find this isn’t the cause. Any ideas or experience in knife adjustment would be greatly appreciated.


23 replies so far

View DS's profile

DS

3271 posts in 2904 days


#1 posted 08-03-2019 07:30 PM

Check that the infeed and outfeed tables are “in plane” with each other.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Rich

4842 posts in 1073 days


#2 posted 08-03-2019 07:31 PM

The knives should be perfectly level with the out feed table. You adjust the depth of cut by lowering the in feed table.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7469 posts in 2682 days


#3 posted 08-03-2019 07:32 PM

I have my knives on my 6 1/8” Jointer set to 1/16th above the outfeed table … Any ideas…
- controlfreak

Yes, your knives are set way too high. They should be set dead level with the outfeed table, or no more than a few thou proud at most.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Peteybadboy

1030 posts in 2433 days


#4 posted 08-03-2019 07:36 PM

I would agree the 1/6” is way to high.

-- Petey

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DS

3271 posts in 2904 days


#5 posted 08-03-2019 07:38 PM

I think I misread the OP thinking the blades were already flush with the outfeed.
Yes, like others have said, you WANT them flush with the outfeed table (and parallel tables helps too)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Aj2

2432 posts in 2281 days


#6 posted 08-03-2019 08:38 PM

Turn your board around and raise the out feed table the same amount as the snipe it left.
Hopefully your outfeed is adjustable

-- Aj

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controlfreak

149 posts in 85 days


#7 posted 08-03-2019 09:43 PM

Thanks for the replies. After YouTube surfing I lowered the knives to where they did not move a straight edge on rotation any more. I then eliminated the rear snipe however I now had a touch of snipe on the leading edge and I could feel a little catch as the board hit the out feed table. I then readjusted the knives to just barely move a straight edge on rotation and the rear snipe returned and at the end of the pass I could hear a loud crack. It is very difficult to find that top dead center but I ran out of time today due to cocktail hour. I think I will need to remove the fence and get some better lighting and see if I can get the blade dead even with the outfeed. The outfeed table is cast as part of the joiner so no adjustment there. The infeed table has a dovetail type of adjustment and I have no idea how to adjust if it is not perfectly co-planer to the outfeed. I will work on the blade height to outfeed for now and cross the next bridge when I come to it.

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coxhaus

145 posts in 1378 days


#8 posted 08-03-2019 10:21 PM

I use the gauge in the middle and the gauge in the second picture to setup my jointer. I had a hard time without the gauge. I don’t remember the name but I can look it up.

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Rich

4842 posts in 1073 days


#9 posted 08-03-2019 10:31 PM


I use the gauge in the middle and the gauge in the second picture to setup my jointer. I had a hard time without the gauge. I don t remember the name but I can look it up.

- coxhaus

It’s a Oneway Multi Gauge. I have one too. Works great for finding TDC and then ensuring your knives are all set to zero inches relative to your out feed.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

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MrUnix

7469 posts in 2682 days


#10 posted 08-03-2019 11:49 PM

... or you can get a dial indicator kit, which is more versatile and about a third of the cost of the mulit-gauge:

They run around $35 at places like amazon, and with the different tips, can be used for a zillion different things besides just setting up your WW machinery :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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coxhaus

145 posts in 1378 days


#11 posted 08-04-2019 06:10 AM

The Oneway Multi Gauge is way better for a jointer. I use a dial indicator for my table saw and drill press as I have both gauges. The dial indicator is great for runout on the drill press and drills bits.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1781 posts in 1977 days


#12 posted 08-04-2019 09:12 AM

DIY your own Oneway Multi Gauge
https://www.lumberjocks.com/CaptainKlutz/blog/129295

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Rich's profile

Rich

4842 posts in 1073 days


#13 posted 08-04-2019 02:15 PM

+1 on the Oneway. I have it and a Starrett dial indicator with the magnetic base. Both are useful, but the Oneway shines for jointer set up because it sits flat with the dial at zero, allowing a quick and accurate reading. Besides ensuring the blades are set right, I keep it next to the jointer so I can precisely adjust the in feed relative to the out feed for cut depth.

I bought my Oneway about 20 years ago for about half of what they go for today.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3883 posts in 1871 days


#14 posted 08-04-2019 03:08 PM

I’ve never found it necessary to use anything but a straight edge to set the height of the knives, though I did make a simple magnetic jig (same idea as the Jointer Pal) when I got my first antique Delta 4” jointer because it helped to hold them in place while I tightened the gibs. It was nearly impossible to hold them at the right level and set the gibs with only 2 hands.

Assuming that you get the knives set correctly, make sure that your technique is not what is now causing the snipe. At the end of the pass, all of the downward pressure needs to be on the outfeed side. Also get a long straight edge and make sure that the infeed and outfeed table are perfectly parallel (coplanar when at zero). If the outfeed slopes up even slightly relative to the infeed, it basically causes a gap under the outfeed side is the leading edges climps and when the trailing edges is no longer supported by the infeed, you will get that crack you describe as it basically falls onto the spinning bade and you will get snipe.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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coxhaus

145 posts in 1378 days


#15 posted 08-05-2019 03:54 AM

There is nothing hard about setting up the knives on the 6 inch Delta jointer using Oneway Multi Gauge. The nice thing about the Oneway Multi Gauge is you can slide it along the knife edge to test the full knife edge to make sure one end is not higher than the other.

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