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Outboard chuck use on a large platter

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Forum topic by Rink posted 08-01-2019 08:14 PM 379 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rink

127 posts in 518 days


08-01-2019 08:14 PM

I have a new (to me) Nova 2024. Much larger than my old 12” swing Delta 1460. I just successfully turned a 16” platter without issue.

I have some walnut slabs drying in my back yard and just cut off a 20” x 20” square, about 2.5” thick (slightly bowed, not completely dry, and heavy). I was going to cut a 20” circle to fit it onboard, but now I’m thinking to keep the square shape and turn it outboard. My thought is to square the blank, then do some hand planing to attach a face plate. I have a heavy duty HTC125 chuck and also a Supernova2 with 3” jaws.

My questions: I was thinking that I would flatten the bottom on the lathe, then glue a waste block in the middle and shape it to take a chuck. Is this a good idea or courting disaster? I think that cutting a recess for a chuck would be stronger, but then I’m not leaving a lot of room for digging out the top of the platter. Would the chuck recess need to be deep for a platter of this size? If I use the heavy duty chuck, I assume it’s stronger, but it would hold the platter further from the lathe, possibly causing more imbalance. Would the 3” Supernova jaws be big enough?

Thanks for any advice.

David


17 replies so far

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Wildwood

2718 posts in 2615 days


#1 posted 08-01-2019 08:43 PM

If going to use your face plate recommend using glue paper joint! Need heavy duty paper grocery bag or craft paper and let glue dry sufficiently. Think either chuck will work, would need a dove tail recess for the Nova if not mistaken.

Use my Oneway Talon with #2 jaw set for holding large hollow forms. I don’t want my work to touch the chuck body so recess little less than 1/4” or so.

-- Bill

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MrUnix

7468 posts in 2680 days


#2 posted 08-01-2019 08:51 PM

If going to use your face plate recommend using glue paper joint! Need heavy duty paper grocery bag or craft paper and let glue dry sufficiently.
- Wildwood

I’ve used the paper glue joint method, as well as just gluing directly. I have never had a failure with a direct glue joint, but have had a couple of failures with the paper ones. And it would seem that the larger the workpiece, the more prone to failure a paper glue joint would be IMO.

But then again, I also drill and thread the glue block so it fits directly on the spindle – no chuck needed. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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ibewjon

911 posts in 3274 days


#3 posted 08-01-2019 09:19 PM

I also tried the paper glue joint. ONCE! I almost put a sattelite in orbit when it popped off. I have direct glued after that launch.

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Underdog

1389 posts in 2516 days


#4 posted 08-01-2019 09:33 PM

I’d only use a paper glue joint on something that only needed to be finessed a little. If you’re going to be putting leverage on a turning use a glue block and a chuck, or just a face plate.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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LesB

2169 posts in 3924 days


#5 posted 08-01-2019 09:43 PM

You can skip the glue block method and go directly to a chuck mount using the method I describe in the blog below.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/LesB/blog/118409

-- Les B, Oregon

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Underdog

1389 posts in 2516 days


#6 posted 08-01-2019 09:46 PM

3” jaws? That might be enough, but 4” would be better.
Flatten a spot on your blank as you say, then turn a glue block to fit your 3” jaws as closely as possible- like 3-1/16 or 3-1/8”. You want it just bigger than the jaws are when they are closed so that you have maximum holding power. I’d probably turn a 1-1/2 to 2” thick block that’s 4-5” in diameter and then make a 90 degree step down to the 3” jaw size. Turn the step deep enough to utilize most of the jaw depth, but not so deep as to hold the jaws off the shoulder. If you’re using the NOVA, then it’s probably a dovetail jaws? You might match that angle and get a better grip.
Obviously the backside glue surface should be flat too…

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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Underdog

1389 posts in 2516 days


#7 posted 08-01-2019 09:52 PM



You can skip the glue block method and go directly to a chuck mount using the method I describe in the blog below.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/LesB/blog/118409

- LesB

Hey Les, I think he was concerned about not having enough wood on the bottom to allow enough depth on his platter. In which case the glue block would be the ticket.

In my opinion there’s enough meat with something 2” thick that you could make a 3/8 to 1/2 recess in the bottom or top (depending on whether you turn the bottom or top first) for the chuck, and still have a good depth on the platter with room left over for bottom thickness.

But that router trick is slick…

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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TheDane

5670 posts in 4144 days


#8 posted 08-02-2019 12:41 AM

If it were mine, I would skip the chuck(s) altogether and forget about a recess.

I routinely attach a waste/glue block to a faceplate, then glue the waste/glue block directly to the workpiece (I would not use a paper joint).

Make sure glue/waste block and the place you attach the workpiece are flat, and let the wood glue you use cure overnight.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2385 posts in 2470 days


#9 posted 08-02-2019 01:42 AM

Is the finished piece going to be round? If so, at least cut the corners, and since you have a bandsaw just cut it round, less load on whatever holding method you decide on. FYI for glue blocks and the mating surface, both should be slightly concave, ie gap in the center. I use thick CA glue.

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TheDane

5670 posts in 4144 days


#10 posted 08-02-2019 03:21 AM

FWIW, I have never trusted CA for a large piece … it dries brittle and doesn’t have much shear strength. On the other hand, Lyle Jamieson uses thick CA and says he has never had a problem.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Rink's profile

Rink

127 posts in 518 days


#11 posted 08-02-2019 04:45 AM

Ha. Thanks everyone. Ask 10 woodworkers how to do something, and you’ll get 10 (excellent) opinions plus a link to someone else’s opinion!

I think Jim is right that there’s enough meat. I’ll just use a faceplate to start, use a bunch of screws that go about an inch into the wood. Then cut a 3/8” deep recess and use 5” jaws to hold it. Tried and true method.

What I haven’t decided yet is whether to cut it square and turn outboard, or cut it round, which will bring me just under 20” and allow me to cut over the bed.

Gerry, if I’m understanding you correctly, you’re suggesting using a glued faceplate on BOTH sides. I don’t think I could do that outboard because I don’t have a vacuum chuck and there would be no way to use a jam chuck to turn off the second faceplate. Is there another way to do that?

David

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TheDane

5670 posts in 4144 days


#12 posted 08-02-2019 02:35 PM

Gerry, if I’m understanding you correctly, you’re suggesting using a glued faceplate on BOTH sides. I don’t think I could do that outboard because I don’t have a vacuum chuck and there would be no way to use a jam chuck to turn off the second faceplate. Is there another way to do that?

Actually, I should have been clearer … I would only use the glue block on what would become the face (to shape the bottom). If you have enough thickness, you could skip the glue block and screw a faceplate directly to the workpiece. You could then cut a tenon (or recess if you prefer) on the bottom, reverse the piece onto a chuck and turn the top.

Turning outboard does present some challenges due to the absence of the tailstock, but turners have been finding ways to hold their work for hundreds (perhaps thousands) of years before the invention of the scroll chuck a few decades ago.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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waho6o9

8749 posts in 3058 days


#13 posted 08-02-2019 02:45 PM

Great idea LesB, thank you!

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

676 posts in 1782 days


#14 posted 08-02-2019 03:53 PM

I think your plan should work out fine. The bottom will have to have some recess anyway for the platter to sit flat on most surfaces.
As to round or square… have you considered others? I assume you will have a rim of at least 1.5” on the platter before you start hollowing the top.
Using your indexing on the lathe it would be easy to layout for an octogon, pie crust edge, scalloped or other.
After truing up the top you can cut the design (radial arm, band, or scroll saw) and leave the chuck attached to insure the same center. It should be easy to cut your design since the edge will be down to 1/4” at that time?
Here is one (or three) by Dipa with a different edge.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5YDnq8EHqw

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Rink

127 posts in 518 days


#15 posted 08-02-2019 04:47 PM


Using your indexing on the lathe it would be easy to layout for an octogon, pie crust edge, scalloped or other.
After truing up the top you can cut the design (radial arm, band, or scroll saw) and leave the chuck attached to insure the same center.
- LeeMills

Interesting video, Lee. Thanks. I don’t love his designs, but his methods give me ideas (but what the heck are the tools he’s turning with?). I’ll definitely experiment, but with smaller platters to start. I did do something similar on a “box” that I made:

David

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