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Forum topic by TEK73 posted 08-01-2019 08:08 PM 384 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TEK73

191 posts in 212 days


08-01-2019 08:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: beech question finishing

I’m building a bed frame, but I’m not quite happy with the finish.
For the most it looks very nice and as I expected/wanted, but I have one area that does not look to nice.
The wood is beech (I’m told).
I have sanded it down with 60,80,120 and 180 grid. The end part has probably seen more 60 grid than the rest as I have done some extra sanding on/around the edge, but this goes for all joints – but the discoloration is only on this spot, it is also all the way across, so I suspect it’s not a sanding issue.

The board is treated with boiled linseed oil.

I’m seeking advice about what I should do to fix this and get a even surface as it’s on the rest if the boards.

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin


10 replies so far

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splintergroup

2902 posts in 1727 days


#1 posted 08-01-2019 08:15 PM

looks like a wood defect, either something happened while the tree was growing or that color change marks a spot where there is a crack. if you run a piece of sandpaper lengthwise across that line. do you hear a different sound from one side to the other? You might get the same effect tapping your fingernail on each side as well.

If this is not a crack, there is not much you can do to hide the “defect” other than find a way to artfully use a pen to draw in continuous grain lines to help camouflage it.

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Rich

4952 posts in 1094 days


#2 posted 08-01-2019 08:31 PM

I’d call it a feature. I see what you’re referring to, but I wouldn’t worry about it. Like splintergroup said, it’s just the wood.

-- Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to sound smarter the faster they come at you.

View Mario's profile

Mario

186 posts in 3901 days


#3 posted 08-01-2019 08:41 PM

Wood defect, most likely fungal attack when the tree was still standing, you can’t sand it away, either live with it or apply veneer from the same species over the affected board, really not much you can do to hide this.

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Kelly

2427 posts in 3449 days


#4 posted 08-02-2019 01:57 AM

My suspicious run to this tree got hit by major wind or something, and you are not going to change the wood. It is a feature of the wood and to change it would turn it into faux wood.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5981 posts in 3318 days


#5 posted 08-02-2019 03:40 AM

To me it looks like a dry lap mark in the finish. If that’s the case, a light scuff sanding with a 400-600 grit sanding sponge and another coat should improve the finish.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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TEK73

191 posts in 212 days


#6 posted 08-02-2019 06:18 AM

Thanks everyone for your feedback.
When I run my finger over the area there are a difference. It feels a bit dryer on the lighter area. Almost like it does shere there are more figured grain. Not sure what/if that means anything.


To me it looks like a dry lap mark in the finish. If that s the case, a light scuff sanding with a 400-600 grit sanding sponge and another coat should improve the finish.

- pintodeluxe

I may test this as there will be no harm in adding another coat.
I assume I should sand and coat the whole frame and not just this area?

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

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pintodeluxe

5981 posts in 3318 days


#7 posted 08-02-2019 06:22 AM

Recoating the whole frame would be best, but BLO is pretty forgiving.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1880 posts in 1999 days


#8 posted 08-02-2019 07:52 AM

For my eyes, and your comment that it feels different: it looks like a defect in wood.
The board is flat sawn, and shows large center limb area next to defect.
My guess is you have line of sap wood from a branch the tree grew around as it aged.

One way to fix a feature in wood like that, would be to use inlay technique and attempt a veneer patch that matches the existing grain. Adding more finish is not going to cover it up.
A talented painter could use artist brushes and some matching dye or acrylic colors and paint the missing grain back onto the board. But would want to cover it with a film finish (shellac, lacquer, poly, etc) to prevent scratching off your artwork?

Call it a beauty mark. All famous Hollywood models have one. wink wink….

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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Ocelot

2347 posts in 3143 days


#9 posted 08-02-2019 05:53 PM

The blanket or quilt will hang down and cover that, if it’s on the rail.

Looks like wind damage or the log or tree was handled roughly when it was felled.

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TungOil

1328 posts in 1000 days


#10 posted 08-02-2019 10:14 PM

Looks like character to me

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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