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Who likes krenov planes?

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Forum topic by Thorbjorn88 posted 07-31-2019 10:38 PM 1081 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Thorbjorn88

99 posts in 701 days


07-31-2019 10:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: krenov plane

I recently read David Finck’s book and Scott Meek’s video on making Krenov planes. I get the impression from both that they expect that you’ll love krenov planes so much you’ll make a full set and never touch your metal planes again. Has anyone experienced that? Who’s built one krenov plane hated it and never looked back? What about people who have built one or two and like then but still use mostly metal planes? I’m not quite done making my first one so I haven’t tried it yet.

-- Dave


26 replies so far

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SMP

1446 posts in 464 days


#1 posted 08-01-2019 04:33 AM

Personally I’m not a fan of the hammer adjust wedge planes in general. So i don’t really use the one i made. Though i do prefer wood planes for lighter feel and smoother movement of wood on wood. I much prefer fine tuning set and forget like on bailey planes. And probably use my old Stanley #4 the most. But i do actually really like transitional planes which is great for budget. Since the trend is to collect all the metal planes like pokemon has driven up the cost of metal planes 10fold, my transitional jointer cost me $30. The only plane i use regularly that has hmer/wedge is my plough plane.

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therealSteveN

4285 posts in 1133 days


#2 posted 08-01-2019 08:54 AM

Adjusting hand planes with a hammer knock is the harder sell, between that and an adjustment wheel. Working from a wooden base, and usually with a very dynamic hunk of steel, a Krenov, which is an extension of Japanese Kanna is a much older, and likely wider used way to go. If we grew up smacking a plane to adjust them, instead of spinning a wheel, this wouldn’t be a question.

Ron Hock is still carrying James Krenovs torch, and is a wonderful resource for info. We all know he makes some of the best steel for a hand plane, regardless of Eastern, or Western influence.

I’ve heard it said more than once you have to pick a road to follow, and stick with it. I always question that, and like any blended woodworker I like to know and understand all of it, and to be able to use all of it. Does it take me longer to adjust my Kanna? You betcha. I can spin up a Western plane in seconds. But I still do both, just because I can, and also because it’s fun.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Don W

19380 posts in 3126 days


#3 posted 08-01-2019 09:47 AM

I’ve built several krenov style planes. I grab my first smoother every once in a while just because. The only advantage I could see is the ability to make them yourself, which allows some flexibility in size and shape. Some of use like to build and fuss with tools, and some like to woodwork. Building wooden planes merge those talents. Krenov used used plane blades, which likely put the cost to zero.

I’m sure there was a little marketing thought in the plan as well. Anything a business person can do to bring light to his talents is a good thing, and krenov was more than just a great woodworker, he knew how to market himself.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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TravisH

693 posts in 2494 days


#4 posted 08-01-2019 10:33 AM

I have made three Krenov planes. The typical smoother with 45° bed angle, a second with 55 °, and then a small block plane. I have a Stanley war era 4 and 5 then a made in England 4 and a modern day block.

I use the Krenovs and the Stanley 5 frequently. The small block is the most frequently used as I seam to grab it all the time for fine adjustments, easing corners, etc.. Just small compact and the Hock blade seams to be razor sharp and amazing easy to adjust. I usually don’t take the blade out except to sharpen. Just a few light taps and on the plane body or wedge solves all adjustments needed. The other two Krenov’s are the opposite and finicky to adjust. Stanley’s of course easy to adjust.

I really enjoy using them more as much more tactile in feel. I find with the metal planes very much is about sound of the shaving for me and a lot less tactile. With the Krenov’s very “grounded” feeling and the board surface texture/cut transferred through the plane to your hand.

I plan on adding a few higher dollar planes to the mix at some point to try out.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2370 posts in 3197 days


#5 posted 08-01-2019 08:01 PM

I bought 5 of the little $4 Chinese “bean planes” and frequently pick up one of them to chamfer an edge or just fool around with wood. They are 4 pieces – body, steel pin, iron and wedge. I guess I haven’t looked at Krenov planes enough to appreciate why they are better. I do have one of Krenov’s books.

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BubbaIBA

520 posts in 2935 days


#6 posted 08-07-2019 12:00 PM

A small Krenov style plane is my goto plane for chamfering edges and many other jobs that are normally done with a metal block plane. It is lighter and can be easily used in either direction with either hand.

Four planes I use:

Ralph over at Accidental Woodworker uses one I made as a shooting plane. While they do not replace my other wood stock planes or the metal planes they have an important place in my shop.

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Aj2

2561 posts in 2357 days


#7 posted 08-07-2019 01:37 PM

Nice looking planes Bubba. Are they made from
African mahogany?

-- Aj

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Thorbjorn88

99 posts in 701 days


#8 posted 08-07-2019 02:54 PM

Cool, thanks for sharing. I think I’ll have enough time in the shop on saturday to finish my first one up and then I might have my own opinion.

-- Dave

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BubbaIBA

520 posts in 2935 days


#9 posted 08-08-2019 01:45 AM



Nice looking planes Bubba. Are they made from
African mahogany?

- Aj2

Thanks AJ. IIRC Sepele.

ken

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BubbaIBA

520 posts in 2935 days


#10 posted 08-08-2019 01:47 AM



Cool, thanks for sharing. I think I ll have enough time in the shop on saturday to finish my first one up and then I might have my own opinion.

- Thorbjorn88

Good luck, I find the smaller ones work the best. They work ok as a Jack or a Try but excel as a smoother.

ken

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Aj2

2561 posts in 2357 days


#11 posted 08-08-2019 02:31 AM

Are you guys using Hock blades or David Fincks blades.

-- Aj

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Thorbjorn88

99 posts in 701 days


#12 posted 08-08-2019 02:57 AM

I actually finished the plane tonight. The blade is actually one I made from o1 steel and I haven’t hardened it yet so I haven’t really tried it. It actually works kinda ok with the in hardened and unhoned blade.

From what I understand David fincks blades are made by Ron hock in A2 steel whereas the ones he sells on his sight are o1. Also it doesn’t look like fincks site has the blades anymore.

-- Dave

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Aj2

2561 posts in 2357 days


#13 posted 08-08-2019 03:58 AM

Looks great just like I would envision a Krenov plane .

-- Aj

View BubbaIBA's profile

BubbaIBA

520 posts in 2935 days


#14 posted 08-08-2019 09:39 AM



Are you guys using Hock blades or David Fincks blades.

- Aj2

Aj,

Hock cutters, I’m not a fan of A2.

ken

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waho6o9

8798 posts in 3136 days


#15 posted 08-08-2019 01:44 PM

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