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Advice about buying either a delta 36-725 or a rockwell unisaw, and how to convince my parents

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Forum topic by Bluecrafter64 posted 07-30-2019 02:22 PM 1099 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bluecrafter64

3 posts in 53 days


07-30-2019 02:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question buying convincing parents table saw

Some background, I’m a 15-year-old who is getting into woodworking and I want to buy a table saw, the problem is my parents are reluctant to let me buy/ let me buy one. The primary reason being price, secondary is storage, and third is if I would really use it. In regards to price, I’ve been looking on Craigslist and eBay and I have found two listings that I find reasonable in my price range, one is a two-year-old Delta 36-725, and the other is a Rockwell Unisaw from the 1980s, I’ve done enough research and know that a Unisaw for $400 in relatively good condition is one hell of a steal, and would instantly go with that. The problem is that my parents already don’t want to buy/ help me buy/ let me buy the delta 36-725 which the seller has agreed to sell for $325. The other problem being that I have to fit it into a garage occupied by two cars. Any advice on which saw I should buy, and how to convince my parents, is very much appreciated.

Rockwell Unisaw https://www.ebay.com/itm/223602188890?pb=0&_trksid=p2385738.m4383.l4626.c10&nrd=true&autorefresh=true

Delta 36-725 https://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/tls/d/chicago-delta-table-saw/6943005659.html


25 replies so far

View AEVilleneuve's profile

AEVilleneuve

22 posts in 96 days


#1 posted 07-30-2019 02:43 PM

Those are both nice saws. It’s very easy to convince ourselves that we “need” a tool, but a lot harder to convince others. The truth is however, that those might be a little overkill.

If space is an issue, I would recommend spending the money on a nice circular saw with a Kreg track. That should allow you to do pretty much all the same things at a fraction of the cost and storage space.

Most people will recommend you only buy the tools needed for the project you are currently building, and grow your collection slowly that way.

View pottz's profile

pottz

6008 posts in 1467 days


#2 posted 07-30-2019 02:50 PM

well i dont know about the rockwell but i have the delta that i use as a second saw just for doing dado’s and it’s a great saw for the money.you have a problem i never had to deal with,my dad was a woodworker so i had full access to a shop full of tools.i can only encourage your parents to help you pursue what i regard as a great hobby and craft that more kids need to be exposed to,the schools are cutting shop classes more and more so i hope your parents will help you pursue this.good luck,youve come to a great place for help and knowledge.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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CaptainKlutz

1779 posts in 1977 days


#3 posted 07-30-2019 03:25 PM

No advice on parents opinion. Suggest you figure it out together.
Though will say: Last thing you want to do is bring it home, and come the home a few days later to find your parents had trash man haul it away without telling you. DAMHIK

Starting out can be hard without tools from Dad. I started out with Dad’s circular saw, and also wanted a table saw when I was teenager. Made a lot of things with only circular saw and couple saw horses. One thing that helped me convince my parents I was serious enough to deserve having better tools was by finding a local wood worker and hanging around as an ‘apprentice’. He taught me a lot, and helped me use his workshop full of tools when I brought over wood. And frankly, getting decent wood was biggest issue. Big box stores charge a fortune for decent hardwood, and the construction lumber is only good for tree forts (IMHO). So besides getting a saw you also need find/afford wood sources, be able to bring it home, and have storage for it. :-(

Working wood with power tools can use a lot of space. Many of us wood workers give up one bay of the garage for our tools, as they do take a lot of room. Suggest you look at space limitations and choice of saw seriously. Especially that Unisaw. Have you seen it in person? That fence is ~7’ long and it adds ~6” to width of the top. The saw top is 27” wide, and requires ~35” front to back. Do you really have room for a tool that is ~ 3 ft wise x 7.5 ft long X 3 ft tall ft in your parents garage? They are very hard to hide against a wall, or in front of a vehicle (unless own small cars).
The Delta is just as wide front to back, but with a shorter 5.5 ft fence. If space is a premium, it would be better choice.

Best Luck on your wood working adventure!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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Aj2

2431 posts in 2280 days


#4 posted 07-30-2019 03:30 PM

First order of business is for your peeps to stop parking their cars in your woodshop. :)

-- Aj

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

923 posts in 3276 days


#5 posted 07-30-2019 03:32 PM

I agree with the circ saw and kreg track. It would be hard to pass up a real saw, but it is probably your best choice for now.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7469 posts in 2681 days


#6 posted 07-30-2019 03:53 PM

Can’t help with the parents… I’m kind of with them and think you should pass on both.

The Unisaw is nice and could be a lifetime saw… but at 1.5hp, it’s a bit underpowered IMO, will most likely need some mechanical work to get into operation (bearings, belts, etc…), and is missing a few bits, like a blade guard/splitter and miter gauge. It’s also an auction, so that $400 opening bid is probably not where it will wind up selling.

The 36-725 would probably be a better choice for a new wood worker… it has all of it’s safety stuff in place, including a riving knife, has a smaller footprint, and will most likely be plug-n-play. It is priced at around the typical 50% of new price (they can be bought new for $599 or less), so it’s about average in price. My one complaint about them is the proprietary motor arrangement they use. Not an issue up front, but long run.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5521 posts in 2834 days


#7 posted 07-30-2019 04:44 PM

See if you can’t find a Craftsman 113. series saw for around $125. They are good saws, put wheels on it and you will be able to move it out of the way when you are not using it and not disrupt the garage too much.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View EdDantes's profile

EdDantes

74 posts in 393 days


#8 posted 07-30-2019 05:12 PM

Before you buy the saw, I’d suggest seeing if you can find a local class which teaches safety/technique. Even better if you can find some of the ones that teach fundamentals in the context of a set project. It would be a way for you to 1) Learn proper use of the tools and 2) See if it’s something you are really going to like/use. I’d use that as a way to convince your parents that it’s something you will stick with and that you can do safely.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

147 posts in 84 days


#9 posted 07-30-2019 05:26 PM

I have a very small shop and even though I would love a “real” table saw. I ended up with a Kobalt jobsite saw. The Dewalt I was wanting ended up being online only and I was impatient. Anyway the saw folds up and has large wheels with handles to roll like a hand truck. The only way I can work on boards longer than 3’ is to wheel my table saw and miter saw outside the shop. The fence is awful and I keep a speed square handy to align the rip fence to 90 deg. The miter gauge is no good either but a crosscut sled fixed that. I think it is an okay (cheap) starter saw but until I decide to drop $40k on a bigger shop it is what it is. I think all of you will be happier with a Track saw or a jobsite saw over a bigger saw. Something else to consider is dust control If you can roll outside you are able to keep it out of the garage but you will still need a good shop vac or equivalent and a cyclone. Forget to turn it on one time and you will be doing some car washing.

View pottz's profile

pottz

6008 posts in 1467 days


#10 posted 07-30-2019 05:37 PM

bluecrafter64 you didn’t mention if you have taken any woodshop classes in school or other woodworking classes,if not id have to agree with your parents hesitation to invest in a large piece of equipment that may not make the investment in money and space worth it.what has gotten you to this point?

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View SSotolongo's profile

SSotolongo

62 posts in 179 days


#11 posted 07-30-2019 08:58 PM

The only advice I can give you on the parents is you have to talk to them in a manner that convinces them that this isn’t a fad like wanting the latest pair of Air Jordans. This is something you truly like, what your plans are, etc. and that you have done you research on these items. Every parent is different, so I can’t say that it will work. I am the father of a teenager and he is passionate about football. He rarely even misses conditioning in the offseason. Football is essentially a year round sport now. I make sure he gets to wherever he needs to be and make every effort to buy him what he needs when he talks to me about needing something because I see how much he loves what he’s doing.

View ruger's profile

ruger

123 posts in 578 days


#12 posted 07-30-2019 09:21 PM

when i was 15 i spent my summer job money on a motorcycle. my mom had my uncle come and tow it away, never to see the proceeds from the sale.told me i didn’t need a dam motorcycle. now i’m 66 years old and have had some 35 motorcycles through the years,lol. have you made anything to show your parents your really into woodworking? wood shop projects ? thats great that at your age you show much intrest that you want a cabinet saw,but at this stage you have to ask yourself is it practical at this stage. also please be careful.a saw blade can hurt you very quickly in any manor of cutting operations. I would not want my son at that age playing with my 3hp unisaw.without me there at all times.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3060 posts in 2508 days


#13 posted 07-30-2019 10:14 PM

I was lucky. I started using my dad’s Craftsman TS (a 1940s model) about the time I was tall enough to see over the table. He sort of let me figure it out, and I never seriously hurt myself. He let me use all his tools (not that he had that many in those days) without restriction. Not all dads are like that. Some won’t let their kids near their tools. Sad. That C’man TS was a terrible saw, by the way. Severely underpowered, and impossible to keep lined up.

One thing that’s really desirable on a TS is a riving knife; way more injuries are caused by kickback that by blade contact. Lacking a riving knife, many people seem satisfied with a splitter. Most blade guards are more trouble than they are worth, though.

Good luck with your endeavors.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View pottz's profile

pottz

6008 posts in 1467 days


#14 posted 07-30-2019 11:13 PM



I was lucky. I started using my dad s Craftsman TS (a 1940s model) about the time I was tall enough to see over the table. He sort of let me figure it out, and I never seriously hurt myself. He let me use all his tools (not that he had that many in those days) without restriction. Not all dads are like that. Some won t let their kids near their tools. Sad. That C man TS was a terrible saw, by the way. Severely underpowered, and impossible to keep lined up.

One thing that s really desirable on a TS is a riving knife; way more injuries are caused by kickback that by blade contact. Lacking a riving knife, many people seem satisfied with a splitter. Most blade guards are more trouble than they are worth, though.

Good luck with your endeavors.

- runswithscissors


sounds like my dad,i had the run of the shop.probably considered child abuse today.maybe thats why most have no real skills other than video games and tweeting-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View ruger's profile

ruger

123 posts in 578 days


#15 posted 07-30-2019 11:45 PM

Agree,,kickbacks scare me more than anything else with my unisaw.. I have a 1hp bosch job site saw that will pretty much stall out before any kick back occurs. but a 3hp unisaw will not give you much warning.bang,It just happens. not saying it can’t happen with the bosch saw… it has never happened with my unisaw cause i’m aware that saw is not my friend and I respect it , if you can understand what i’m trying to say.

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