LumberJocks

Cabinet assembly workstation/jig in action - 78 cabinets in 7.5 hours

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by MGildersleeve posted 07-28-2019 03:23 PM 1086 views 3 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MGildersleeve's profile

MGildersleeve

5 posts in 101 days


07-28-2019 03:23 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cabinet assembly cabinet assembly jig cabinet assembly workstation assembling cabinets

A few weeks ago, I made a workstation for cabinet assembly. Started assembly on a hotel job with about 450 cabinets last week. After getting a lot of practice getting used to the station I was able to get up to 78 simple wall cabinets assembled in 7.5 hours. This is not our normal building method with the way backs are attached, etc..

This is a video showing the system in action.

https://youtu.be/aTZRB6FSYLo


11 replies so far

View jta's profile

jta

41 posts in 363 days


#1 posted 07-28-2019 04:47 PM

While I don’t think I’ll ever have the need for that many cabinets, that is a really cool jig and setup to speed up the process considerably. Certainly gives me some ideas for perhaps borrowing a few of the simpler jig components though for doing a number of cabinets for my shop.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5659 posts in 3721 days


#2 posted 07-28-2019 06:09 PM

I watched your video; very nice. Most hobbyists don’t use a jig and most fitting problems are the result of not using one. Usually for a one off project, no one wants to take the time to make a jig. They want to dive head first into building their project. A jig can make the difference between something fitting and not fitting. The time it takes to correct any mistake can take longer than building a jig. This is especially true when working with expensive woods. One bad mistake and an expensive piece of wood could end up in the scrap pile. I don’t build much furniture, but I do build large train models where there is a lot of duplicate parts. I have learned from my past mistakes that a jig will ensure all my parts fit as they should. Just using a fence and a stop block on a table saw is not enough. I have spent many hours designing and building a jig only needing to use it for a few minutes. Is it worth the time and effort? I think it is. In the long run, it can save you time, material and anguish. Being 84, I have the luxury of patience.

I noticed in your video, that you were tacking the wood parts together with a nail gun and then going back over with screws. Most people building a cabinet would not first nail, but go directly to screws. I also noticed you didn’t use any glue. Do you feel glue is not necessary? Also what kind of screws are you using? I’m guessing they are NOT drywall screws

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1319 posts in 973 days


#3 posted 07-28-2019 06:38 PM

Great system, and a wonderful example of lean/6s in action. You are under 6 min. per carcass, that’s moving!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

481 posts in 1556 days


#4 posted 07-28-2019 08:37 PM

And all of the screws have heads on the right end!

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5338 posts in 2787 days


#5 posted 07-28-2019 11:38 PM



And all of the screws have heads on the right end!

- Jack Lewis


Just for the right side of the cabinet. The left side gets the screws with the head on the other end. Some people you have to explain every little detail to them.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2422 posts in 2276 days


#6 posted 07-29-2019 12:49 AM

What about the doors and drawers. Making doors is way more interesting.
The video looks sped up slightly.
Sorry to be nit picking.
We’re all experts here so keep it real :)
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

997 posts in 3561 days


#7 posted 07-29-2019 10:22 AM



Great system, and a wonderful example of lean/6s in action. You are under 6 min. per carcass, that’s moving!

- TungOil

Definitely. A perfect example of Lean.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View farmfromkansas's profile

farmfromkansas

120 posts in 92 days


#8 posted 07-29-2019 11:31 AM

Suppose those boxes are strong enough, held together with screws, but when I was building cabinets, ran a groove for the bottom in the base units, and it did wonders for strength of the boxes. And are these euro style cabinets, no face frame?

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3029 posts in 2826 days


#9 posted 07-29-2019 12:25 PM

I’ll be going back and watching it in more detail to see if there is anything I can “borrow” when I make the closet drawer systems for the new house. I’m only making 6 bases but anything that will speed things along and provide a more standard build is a great help.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5338 posts in 2787 days


#10 posted 07-31-2019 03:53 AM



Suppose those boxes are strong enough, held together with screws, but when I was building cabinets, ran a groove for the bottom in the base units, and it did wonders for strength of the boxes. And are these euro style cabinets, no face frame?

- farmfromkansas


They are strong enough (IMH0). I built bunches of boxes like that when I worked the the school district. Believe me Those teachers know how to fill a box to the max. I did use 5 screws across instead of 4 and a 3/4 plywood throughout including the cabinet back. I didn’t have he nice work station though.

Most the time I’d use a separate toe kick but occasionally I’d some with the integral toe kick.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View MGildersleeve's profile

MGildersleeve

5 posts in 101 days


#11 posted 08-01-2019 12:04 AM

This is an unusual build, as it’s so many cabinets and the buyer only wanted to pay a certain amount. So my boss and the buyer had to agree on a different building method. My boss says if they want more screws in the back they can put them in themselves. The general contractor, I mean. We aren’t installing these cabinets. But, a couple of times, I put the prefinished side out, instead of in. I destroyed the back trying to get them off the carcass. That says to me it’s a strong as it needs to be. No, they are not drywall screws, they are cabinet screws painted black. My boss likes them, because they are easy to see. A lot of people think they are drywall screws, though.

Thank you for mentioning lean 6. I had to look up what that meant. That’s an interesting concept I will have to look into more. It seems like what I like to do with jigs and the work flow of shops. I love coming in and tuning up shops.

Yes, this video starts at double speed, as stated. All my videos are sped up, because I’m trying to communicate with people that know what they’re going. Not beginners. So no need to waste those people’s time.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com