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Remove impressions in wipe on polyurethane finish

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Forum topic by nek4life posted 07-27-2019 01:48 PM 847 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nek4life

11 posts in 230 days


07-27-2019 01:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question maple finishing shaker

I’m using a wipe on poly finish for the first time (General Finishes Arm-R-Seal) and ended up getting some impressions left in the poly where the I had bench cookie finishing cones placed underneath. I had let the finish dry 24 hours, but didn’t realize it was still soft and when I sanded the bottom of the table top I must have been pressing too hard and left a few marks in the top.

Do I just need to sand the finish on the top back down to the same level as the impressions or is there a way to fill them then sand it out from the top? This is my first real project and I would like to have a pristine finish at the very least on the table top.

I can try to get some pictures later if necessary, but I’m hoping my description here is enough. The impressions are maybe 2mm ish deep, but very visible from the top and especially in the sheen.

Thanks!


15 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5760 posts in 3007 days


#1 posted 07-27-2019 03:43 PM

I’m on the side of you need to remove what’s there and start over. Trying to repair this kind of problem is possible, but there are limits to what can be done and how well it turns out. Given this is your first “real” project, removing it and starting with fresh coats would be best (IMHO). You didn’t mention how many coats you applied, but it may be a thin film build to remove. Also, sanding is possible, but the finish needs to be fairly well cured. If you see “corns” on the sandpaper, it isn’t dry enough. Scraping it off…or using a chemical remover (stripper) might be a better choice.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11855 posts in 3942 days


#2 posted 07-27-2019 04:10 PM

The container likely has this info. But just in case…Dry Timeshttps://generalfinishes.com/wood-finishes-retail/oil-based-topcoats/arm-r-seal-oil-based-topcoat
Looks like you can sand after 72 hours…depending on humidity.
As Fred indicated, sanding is the best way to go.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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SMP

1401 posts in 419 days


#3 posted 07-27-2019 04:28 PM

I’ve made that mistake before. That is why now I always finish the “show side” last. And if the other side gets some marks and isn’t going to be visible, i just leave it. But you got advice for how to fix it this time. Good luck!

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2496 posts in 4384 days


#4 posted 07-27-2019 04:32 PM

you have 2 issues

uncured finish

bench cookies have a plastic/rubber coating
most all finishes are a form of plastic , and will react with most any finish
I have seen those plastic place mats , eat into and be impossible to remove even on well cure finishes
NEVER , put any plastic in contact with a finish for any period of time .
Bubble wrap is a disaster waiting to happen , on a relatively new finish can really do a number
always put cloth or paper in between

I agree sand it down and start over

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

288 posts in 241 days


#5 posted 07-27-2019 05:30 PM



you have 2 issues

uncured finish

bench cookies have a plastic/rubber coating
most all finishes are a form of plastic , and will react with most any finish
I have seen those plastic place mats , eat into and be impossible to remove even on well cure finishes
NEVER , put any plastic in contact with a finish for any period of time .
Bubble wrap is a disaster waiting to happen , on a relatively new finish can really do a number
always put cloth or paper in between

I agree sand it down and start over

- CharlesNeil

Is this really you?
I read on another forum that you had died. Glad you’re alive.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2496 posts in 4384 days


#6 posted 07-27-2019 05:34 PM

Sorry to disappoint
I’m doing well

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2496 posts in 4384 days


#7 posted 07-27-2019 05:38 PM

Sorry to disappoint
I’m doing well
Kinda backed off the internet
Rather be fishing.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

288 posts in 241 days


#8 posted 07-27-2019 05:39 PM

No disappointment here,
I always figured you would live to be 110 – 115
(Keep fishing and you might make it that long.)

View nek4life's profile

nek4life

11 posts in 230 days


#9 posted 07-27-2019 11:23 PM

I have 2 coats of Seal-A-Cell and 2 coats of Arm-R-Seal currently applied. My plan was to put one more coat of Arm-R-Seal and call it a day. Based on the feedback here I think what I’ll do is finish up the table legs and aprons and then the bottom side of the table top. Then I’ll let the top finish drying for the a few more days then sand it back until the marks are gone then reapply the Arm-R-Seal to the table top only.

The only reason I say this is my first “real” project is because I took a community workshop at Vermont Woodworking School and milled all the sugar maple from rough lumber and made a nice shaker style table. It’s only the second piece of furniture I’ve made. The instructor did a lot of the setup, but I’m actually really impressed that I was actually able to make something so nice so I don’t want to screw it up!

Thanks for all the help. I love this forum. So many people have such great info to share here!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3925 posts in 1088 days


#10 posted 07-28-2019 02:38 AM

Sand to where you were when you started application, then go 2 grits further. So if you were at 220, go 300, and 360. Tack off any dust, and nibs.

This is General Finishes application info.. On this page scroll down, and look for the 6 steps. Read the first 2 completely.

What Charles told you about plastic is very true. The best prop I have found to keep an in progress finish piece off the table is buy some heavy duty roofing nails (longer than regular ones). Cut a bunch of 4” squares of something 3/4” thick, and drill a hole the size of the nail through the middle of each piece of wood. Insert a nail, and presto, you have a secure, stable prop to hold parts up while the finish dries. No chemical mayhem, and Cheeeeep.

-- Think safe, be safe

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2496 posts in 4384 days


#11 posted 07-28-2019 12:38 PM

nek for life

not a gpod idea, oil is a liquid, and it can swell the wood , you really need to do both sides at the same time or it can cup the top

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1103 days


#12 posted 07-29-2019 04:29 AM

To support boards I’m finishing, I use the tack strips they sell for carpet installation. They are four foot long strips of one inch wide wood with dozens of sharp tacks protruding from the surface. You can buy a box of 100 strips (a lifetime supply) for about $20. They come with nails ready to drive for the carpet installer that you can remove with pliers. They work well for supporting boards being finished, because they spread the weight so evenly over them and don’t leave a pronounced mark in the side that is resting on them.

Like SMP, I like to finish the show side last. Even if the tack strips leave a mark, who cares? It’s on the bottom.

I use them in multiple ways. I have 2 foot square pieces of 1/4” MDF with the strips glued and pin nailed at 4 inch intervals. I also have a couple with a solid bed of tack strips. Finally, a few dozen pieces of 3” by 5” MDF with strips that I can spread around on my spray table for various setups.

View nek4life's profile

nek4life

11 posts in 230 days


#13 posted 07-31-2019 10:51 AM

So I got stripped all the poly off of the table top and realized I had actually dented the wood so there was a bit of sanding I needed to do in order to remove them. I tried raising the dents with warm water, but they didn’t move much, but a bit of sanding removed them.

I haven’t started refinishing yet, but this time around I’m going to be more careful to not put any pressure on the table top while sanding especially not while on the finishing cones.

I might look into some of the other suggestions above to have the piece rest on instead of the finishing cones I currently have now and will also let the poly dry longer in between.

Thanks!

View MPython's profile

MPython

167 posts in 326 days


#14 posted 07-31-2019 12:49 PM


I tried raising the dents with warm water, but they didn t move much, but a bit of sanding removed them.

Thanks!

- nek4life

Get a piece of clean cloth and dip it in water, preferably distilled water to make sure you don’t end up with mineral stains on your nice table top. The cloth should be pretty damp, but not dripping wet. Place the wet cloth on the dent and touch it with the tip of a hot clothes iron. The steam created will penetrate the wood fibers much better than warm water and raise the dent. Sometimes it takes a couple of applications, depending on how deep the dent is and whether the fibers are badly damaged.

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

529 posts in 1199 days


#15 posted 07-31-2019 09:28 PM

if you’re pressing so hard you dented the wood you probably need to let up and change paper more frequently

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