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Best way to heat the workshop with a fixed overhead propane heater?

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Forum topic by wilschroter posted 07-23-2019 10:42 PM 651 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wilschroter

89 posts in 972 days


07-23-2019 10:42 PM

I would like to put a large propane heater with a direct connection to my propane tank at my house. My workshop is the size of a 3 car garage. Right now I’m using electric heaters and as you can imagine it’s not very efficient.
Is anyone here using a fixed mount propane heater?


7 replies so far

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

103 posts in 48 days


#1 posted 07-24-2019 12:00 AM

I use the gas grill thank with the double eye burner but my shop is 10’ x 16’

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GR8HUNTER

6319 posts in 1159 days


#2 posted 07-24-2019 12:29 AM

I use a propane forced hot air heater problem is its 35 degrees and in one hour its 70 degrees which creates a ton of moisture all over the cast iron if you burn a vent free wall heater and let it on all the time I am sure you could avoid this condensation problems :<))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View BoilerUp21's profile

BoilerUp21

135 posts in 1214 days


#3 posted 07-24-2019 01:42 AM

I bought the 30,000btu dyna-glo propane/natural gas heater for my 3 car garage. leave it on lowest setting and keeps the garage at 65 all winter long for very little money. It has a thermostat that shuts the unit off. highly recomend.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dyna-Glo-30-000-BTU-Vent-Free-Blue-Flame-Liquid-Propane-Wall-Heater-BF30PMDG/206556617?cm_mmc=Shopping%7CG%7CBase%7CD28I%7C28-22_BBQ+GRILL%7CNA%7CPLA%7CBrands%7CFixed%7C71700000032321202%7C58700004410186037%7C92700037079252496&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIt5ifqrbM4wIVC5-fCh0W7Q44EAQYASABEgJjDvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

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GR8HUNTER

6319 posts in 1159 days


#4 posted 07-24-2019 02:05 AM



I bought the 30,000btu dyna-glo propane/natural gas heater for my 3 car garage. leave it on lowest setting and keeps the garage at 65 all winter long for very little money. It has a thermostat that shuts the unit off. highly recomend.

- BoilerUp21


is your Garage insulated ?

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View farmfromkansas's profile

farmfromkansas

89 posts in 61 days


#5 posted 07-24-2019 12:31 PM

I worked at a shop that had overhead gas heaters. Things built up a huge amount of dust, although they never caused a fire. We blew the dust out once a year. Would watch about how close to your wood storage, and don’t lean a board up near the thing.

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BattleRidge

113 posts in 663 days


#6 posted 07-27-2019 04:44 PM

I have the Mr Heater Big Maxx 80,000 BTU propane heater (also available in natural gas) and I like it very well. My daughter-in-law also likes it and while standing in front of it one winter day she commented that she wished she had it at her work (though as a bank manager, it wouldn’t quite fit into the office atmosphere there lol).

My shop is 30’ x 40’ x 10’h and at the present the only insulation is 1/2” foam on the outside walls. The ceiling is prepped and the attic is baffled for blown in insulation, but I have yet to insulate (possibly this year). I am undecided in regard to insulating the walls, though I may at some point in the future. The overhead doors (3) and entry door are all insulated.

The heater does a good job particularly considering the building’s present heat loss and the fan does an adequate job of moving the air around for good distribution. The heater is directed at the area where my pick-up is typically parked, and that I use for vehicle and mechanical work as well as assembling larger woodworking projects. This positioning also avoids having the air blow directly through my woodworking area & workbench / assembly table to limit scattering sawdust and such. My finishing area is in my house basement so any air movement in that regard isn’t a concern.

The heater is fastened to the ceiling and for installation, I would highly recommend using a drywall lift (with a couple horizontal 2×4’s to hold the heater) which makes the job much easier by allowing easy hoisting, moving and final positioning. I borrowed a friend’s drywall lift but should you need to rent one, the cost is very reasonable and very much worth it.

The heater is plumbed to a 500 gallon propane tank that supplies propane to our house for the kitchen range / oven and our propane fireplace (we have a heat pump for home heating). For a rough & easy calculation, an 80,000 BTU heater will use about 1 gallon of propane an hour while it is running (1 gallon of propane = approx 91,000 btu) and the better your insulation and the less it runs, the less expensive the cost.

The heater itself is less that $500 and I just use a standard dial-type thermostat. I installed the heater, exterior vent (through the roof), thermostat and interior propane plumbing myself and my propane dealer supplied and installed the line from my shop to the tank & a regulator (at no charge – approx 25’). I would also recommend staying away from a ventless heater due to the moisture issues it can create in the shop. A properly running heater will produce carbon dioxide (naturally in the air we breathe and not to be confused with carbon monoxide that comes from a poorly running appliance) and water vapor which can sometimes cause problems on metal equipment and with wood, and it is best to direct it outside rather than keeping it bottled up in the shop.

A propane heater should be a great improvement over the electric heaters with a much more reasonable cost. Good luck in your future heating.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3353 posts in 1021 days


#7 posted 07-28-2019 03:03 AM


I use a propane forced hot air heater problem is its 35 degrees and in one hour its 70 degrees which creates a ton of moisture all over the cast iron if you burn a vent free wall heater and let it on all the time I am sure you could avoid this condensation problems :<))))

- GR8HUNTER

This can be a huge issue, but it is for real. Happens in all but vented is my experience. Generally they need inspection/permits, yada yada yada.

Also need to throw in, make darn sure it’s either vented, or certified to burn 99.9% of the propane, or you may get that beet red color, and kinda die. So many folks using salamander type heaters in pretty well closed up shops. We used to see this regularly in the ER, most made it, though not all. If you go down in that environment, and nobody saves yer bacon, you too could be a goner.

Thing is there is usually a huge price difference between the safe ones, and the open work models. Big open construction site, no doors or windows are why they invented the much cheaper salamander heaters. Full combustion hangers cost some cash, or the cheap ones last about a week.

-- Think safe, be safe

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