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Tablesaw Sled - Advice Needed

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Forum topic by misterbig posted 07-22-2019 02:10 AM 454 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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misterbig

49 posts in 2125 days


07-22-2019 02:10 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jig

After reading all the post about how great a tablesaw sled is I decided to make one today. It is 34” wide x 30” deep. Made of Baltic birch plywood.

The advice I am looking for is as follows:

1. After performing the 5 cut method. I was able to get it dialed in at .00013” over 30.5”. Is that good enough or should I be fine tuning further?

2. Should I have put t track on the base and the top is of the front fence?

3. Should you finish the top surface with poly or is it better to leave unfinished?

M


15 replies so far

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1415 posts in 1263 days


#1 posted 07-22-2019 11:49 AM

You are implying a level of accuracy that you can’t obtain except with very expensive and specialized measurement equipment. Do the measurement several times in a row and you may find that out. Assuming you did the technique correctly, I think you can safely assume that the error is zero.

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Jack Lewis

472 posts in 1525 days


#2 posted 07-22-2019 12:47 PM


I think you can safely assume that the error is zero.

- ArtMann

I think someone is pulling our leg!

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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misterbig

49 posts in 2125 days


#3 posted 07-22-2019 01:12 PM

I will try the test cut again.

M


You are implying a level of accuracy that you can t obtain except with very expensive and specialized measurement equipment. Do the measurement several times in a row and you may find that out. Assuming you did the technique correctly, I think you can safely assume that the error is zero.

- ArtMann


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PaulDoug

2050 posts in 2151 days


#4 posted 07-22-2019 03:01 PM

I think I would consider that close enough and go on with using the sled….:)

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3353 posts in 1021 days


#5 posted 07-22-2019 03:27 PM


I think you can safely assume that the error is zero.

- ArtMann

I think someone is pulling our leg!

- Jack Lewis

Jack, this was my initial thought too. If someone did follow the method William Ng uses, and knew to do a 5 cut, they know that is an insane number. Acting like it was a first pass, If not said dood needs to buy a lotto tickieeee

-- Think safe, be safe

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

8513 posts in 2597 days


#6 posted 07-22-2019 03:46 PM

If that’s all the error you are getting, then you are good. I wouldn’t add anything to the sled. Keep it simple. This should only be used for crosscuts. Make sleds dedicated for each type of cut. I don’t use any finish on my sleds.

Also, that’s a huge sled. I think mine is like 18”x24” but I need to make another one and the second one will be bigger.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View misterbig's profile

misterbig

49 posts in 2125 days


#7 posted 07-22-2019 03:58 PM

It took me 4 attempts. Looking at the note book that I used. Seems that is the error per inch, not over 30.5” as I originally thought. The error is actually .004034” over 30.5”. Is that still an acceptable result?

I think you can safely assume that the error is zero.

- ArtMann

I think someone is pulling our leg!

- Jack Lewis

Jack, this was my initial thought too. If someone did follow the method William Ng uses, and knew to do a 5 cut, they know that is an insane number. Acting like it was a first pass, If not said dood needs to buy a lotto tickieeee

- therealSteveN

I think you can safely assume that the error is zero.

- ArtMann

I think someone is pulling our leg!

- Jack Lewis

Jack, this was my initial thought too. If someone did follow the method William Ng uses, and knew to do a 5 cut, they know that is an insane number. Acting like it was a first pass, If not said dood needs to buy a lotto tickieeee

- therealSteveN

I think you can safely assume that the error is zero.

- ArtMann

I think someone is pulling our leg!

- Jack Lewis

Jack, this was my initial thought too. If someone did follow the method William Ng uses, and knew to do a 5 cut, they know that is an insane number. Acting like it was a first pass, If not said dood needs to buy a lotto tickieeee

- therealSteveN


View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5970 posts in 3260 days


#8 posted 07-22-2019 04:00 PM

If it rounds to .000” then I think you’re good! The beds on a jointer aren’t even that flat!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

248 posts in 1222 days


#9 posted 07-22-2019 04:02 PM

I think you will get 15 different errors from 15 tests, .004 is less then a hair.
Put a good square on it, if it looks good then it is.

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WoodenDreams

659 posts in 358 days


#10 posted 07-22-2019 04:16 PM

I think your good where it’s at.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

103 posts in 49 days


#11 posted 07-22-2019 04:24 PM

I can only imagine that expansion/contraction due to temperature and humidity is greater than that. I ended up with about 14 screw holes in mine before I decided I was chasing my tail and it was good enough.

View Andre's profile

Andre

2693 posts in 2253 days


#12 posted 07-22-2019 04:31 PM

Close enough, you can always add another strip of wood to the front with a T-track imbedded for a stop and a safety block for the blade to go into is probably a good idea?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2380 posts in 2437 days


#13 posted 07-22-2019 06:54 PM

Measure 3 times and see how they compare. 0.004” over 30.5” is plenty good. I put finish on most all my jigs and fixtures to keep them from soaking up liquid and keeps them cleaner. Never know when a glass or something will get knocked over. I usually use shellac, and seal the wood. It doesnt need much film build.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4588 posts in 4189 days


#14 posted 07-22-2019 07:11 PM

your accuracy is plenty good.

I finished mine top and bottom with just some spray lacquer so that it doesn’t pick up moisture and curl.. also keeps any spills from swelling anything, and makes the bottom easier to wax so it slides without too much effort.

I wouldn’t bother (and didn’t myself) mess with T-track.

I would make a “Box guard” on the rear fence to cover where the blade will come through the back… lest you push the sled and trim a thumb. Or lean forward with an apron on…. just my $0.02 (pic is just online, not mine but mine is identical).
I made mine out of MDF from the plans of Marc Adams in Fine Woodworking. October 2014.. even the rear fence is a stack of MDF jointed.
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/10/22/make-a-simple-sturdy-crosscut-sled

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View clin's profile

clin

1051 posts in 1443 days


#15 posted 07-23-2019 12:12 AM

I think your accuracy is fine. They way to look at it is how far off will a cut be over it’s length. If you’re making 30” cuts, like you might for cabinetry, then you will only be off 0.004” over that length. And that is truly trivial.

I also agree that that number will change a bit due to temperature and humidity affecting the sled, the stock and even the saw. So trying to get it better is just chasing ghosts. You’re much more likely to make it worse.

As for finish, my sleds are also made of Baltic birch, and I have them unfinished. Though I did paste wax the bottom to reduce friction.

As for size, I also have a large sled, even somewhat deeper than yours. Which I use for cabinet sized parts. But I also have a much smaller sled, maybe 13” deep that I used 90% of the time. Horses for courses.

I did not make a flat top fence on my sleds, and wish now that I would have, and then placed T-track on it. That combined with a tape measure strip would be real handy at times. As it is, I end up clamping stop blocks to my fence. Which works fine, but a T-track with a sliding stop would be handier. And with a calibrated tape measure, would make it that much easier to make cuts.

-- Clin

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