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Forum topic by DannyW posted 07-21-2019 05:39 PM 323 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DannyW

186 posts in 252 days


07-21-2019 05:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak veneering

I am in the process of working out the details for an entry hall bench but every time I think I am done something else comes up due to my lack of experience. It will be built with end frames and solid panels attached with stretchers. This morning I was about to cut the legs and start on the joinery when I realized that the face grain on the legs would face only one direction that could be seen, either side or front (duh! of course!). I have seen instructions on making legs using veneer so that the face grain goes all around the leg, but I don’t relish cutting the legs and veneer to match at this point. I guess my question is if the thin veneer edge banding can be used to cover the edge grain, and if so should it face the side or the front? I planned to chamfer the edges anyway so that would cover the glue joints. If I add it to the front it will also give a nice reveal to the stretchers without having to recess them (I will use dowels for this joinery). The legs and frame will be made out of red oak.

-- DannyW


18 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5647 posts in 2948 days


#1 posted 07-21-2019 07:15 PM

I don’t totally understand the dilemma, but won’t the edge banding veneer grain look pretty much like what you’re trying to cover?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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DannyW

186 posts in 252 days


#2 posted 07-21-2019 07:23 PM

I probably didn’t explain myself well. I want face grain to show both from the front and from the side of the leg. Will edge banding show face grain or edge grain? If it is face grain then putting it over the edge grain of the leg does what I want. Maybe I am overthinking this as usual.

-- DannyW

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Lazyman

3748 posts in 1842 days


#3 posted 07-21-2019 08:27 PM

The key is to pick or cut your leg stock so that the grains runs diagonally (corner to corner) when you look at the end grain. That way the grain on all 4 sides will look very similar.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Rich

4701 posts in 1044 days


#4 posted 07-21-2019 08:48 PM

This technique is usually used for quarter sawn wood, but it would ensure the sides of your leg all have the same face grain.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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DannyW

186 posts in 252 days


#5 posted 07-22-2019 02:19 PM

Thanks for the input, I guess I am over complicating things and it is not really that important. I may try the edge banding as a dry run just to see if it looks good, otherwise I won’t worry about it, just put the face grain on the legs facing the sides to match the rest of the end and panel.

-- DannyW

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bondogaposis

5496 posts in 2806 days


#6 posted 07-22-2019 03:03 PM

I guess I don’t get why you are trying to hide the edge grain. It is a normal feature of solid wood construction and is expected. By using edge banding you are going to make a solid wood piece look like it is made of plywood.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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therealSteveN

3390 posts in 1029 days


#7 posted 07-22-2019 03:16 PM

Exactly as rich posted the picture of, That is “Stickley’s Quadralinear leg” detail. Google it as I have typed it, and the world is your oyster. Heck you can also just use Quadralinear, or Stickley leg, you will find articles, on best methods, videos showing how people do it. I just use a normal mitered corner, and interior filler blocks to keep the glue up from becoming a slip-n-slide. Actually one of the easiest legs to do. Regardless of method, TS miter, or router bits plain through complex, you must be able to do them for the length of the leg, because a “kinda” miter cut won’t end well.

With solid stock it is the only way you can get a quartersawn leg on all 4 sides. If the look is plain sawn, you probably don’t need to bother on solid stock. I would only use the edge banding on plywood edges, Even on plywood I usually cut a thin 1/4” solid wood strip, mount it, and router off the overhang. I don’t see a leg being small enough for that to work out though. When I think edge banding I think 3/4” tops, maybe not sure of the leg you are thinking of?

-- Think safe, be safe

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Rich

4701 posts in 1044 days


#8 posted 07-22-2019 03:59 PM


That is “Stickley s Quadralinear leg” detail. Google it as I have typed it, and the world is your oyster.

- therealSteveN

Thanks for expanding on that. I knew it was a Stickley thing, but I didn’t know the formal name for it.

BTW, whoever coined the phrase “world is your oyster” must have never heard of vibrio. :)

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5647 posts in 2948 days


#9 posted 07-22-2019 06:37 PM



Will edge banding show face grain or edge grain?
- DannyW

Edge banding usually looks more like edge grain. You can get veneer with face grain but it’s in larger sheets, you could cut them down to the size you need. Unless you’re trying to get quartersawn grain all around I wouldn’t screw with any of that.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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DannyW

186 posts in 252 days


#10 posted 07-22-2019 07:58 PM

Thanks for that info, I will ignore it.

-- DannyW

View anthm27's profile (online now)

anthm27

1263 posts in 1565 days


#11 posted 07-22-2019 08:09 PM



Thanks for the input, I guess I am over complicating things and it is not really that important. I may try the edge banding as a dry run just to see if it looks good, otherwise I won t worry about it, just put the face grain on the legs the facing the sides to match the rest of the end and panel.

- DannyW

I agree with your comment above about over complicating, you have a lot of hurdles to get over before the project is finished.
Red Oak legs at any angle will look great.

I would recommend do a Nike ((((as In sports shoe))) on this one. IE: JUST DO IT

Kind Regards
Anthony

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

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anthm27

1263 posts in 1565 days


#12 posted 07-22-2019 08:13 PM



This technique is usually used for quarter sawn wood, but it would ensure the sides of your leg all have the same face grain.

- Rich

On a different subject, Sorry Danny to hijack your thread.

Rich on that photo on the top piece of the 4 pieces of lumber there is three little slurs in the wood running at 45 degrees. I,ve vaguely remember that there is a name and reason for these type or marks. What are they caused from again?
Thanks in advance.
Regards
Anthm

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

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Rich

4701 posts in 1044 days


#13 posted 07-22-2019 08:19 PM


Rich on that photo on the top piece of the 4 pieces of lumber there is three little slurs in the wood running at 45 degrees. I,ve vaguely remember that there is a name and reason for these type or marks. What are they caused from again?

- anthm27

Medullary rays. They are a feature of some quarter sawn woods. They are particularly prominent in quarter sawn white oak, although I have some QS cherry that exhibits them as well, just not to the same degree.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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anthm27

1263 posts in 1565 days


#14 posted 07-22-2019 08:22 PM


Rich on that photo on the top piece of the 4 pieces of lumber there is three little slurs in the wood running at 45 degrees. I,ve vaguely remember that there is a name and reason for these type or marks. What are they caused from again?
- anthm27
Medullary rays. They are a feature of some quarter sawn woods.

- Rich

Thank you, Wikipedia) from here.
Thanks

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View DannyW's profile

DannyW

186 posts in 252 days


#15 posted 07-22-2019 08:31 PM


Thanks for the input, I guess I am over complicating things and it is not really that important. I may try the edge banding as a dry run just to see if it looks good, otherwise I won t worry about it, just put the face grain on the legs the facing the sides to match the rest of the end and panel.

- DannyW
Good advice, thanks. I need to just do it!

I agree with your comment above about over complicating, you have a lot of hurdles to get over before the project is finished.
Red Oak legs at any angle will look great.

I would recommend do a Nike ((((as In sports shoe))) on this one. IE: JUST DO IT

Kind Regards
Anthony

- anthm27

Good advice, thanks. I need to just do it!

-- DannyW

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