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Bullnose ogee countertop edge

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Forum topic by Jaxsun posted 07-20-2019 11:03 PM 446 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jaxsun

14 posts in 1117 days


07-20-2019 11:03 PM

Hope everyone’s having a good weekend…I have a customer I’m building a console/entry table for in cherry wood…he has requested that I make the table edge to match his stone counters in the kitchen. They are 1 1/2” thick edges that have a common bullnose with an ogee on top. I’ve never seen an edge router bit like this for wood…does this detail require 2 bits to make it happen? Or is there a single bit for sale that I’m not seeing when I search on the web? I’d appreciate any suggestions….thankyou, Jeff

-- JACK'S SON


12 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

774 posts in 1550 days


#1 posted 07-21-2019 03:31 PM

I’m not 100% clear on your description. Could you provide a sketch or diagram? If I correctly understand, a bullnose is an edge that is rounded over on both the top and bottom. On that basis, it appears that what you are describing is an edge with a roundover on the bottom and an ogee on the top. If that is correct, then yes, you will need two different bits.

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John Smith

1912 posts in 610 days


#2 posted 07-21-2019 06:28 PM

the people that make stone countertops have very specialized bits
to make their profiles. if you want to duplicate a particular pattern,
you may have to use two or three bits in succession to achieve the style
you are looking for.
Like Bilyo said – without a sketch, drawing or photo of what you need
makes it pretty difficult to help you.
a google search for Stone Countertop Edge Images turns up a lot of options.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View SMP's profile

SMP

1302 posts in 353 days


#3 posted 07-21-2019 06:56 PM

For what its worth, i consider a roundover bit kind of a staple that you should have anyways. So its really just buying an additional ogre bit. Good luck!

View LesB's profile

LesB

2151 posts in 3890 days


#4 posted 07-21-2019 07:17 PM

An Ogee bit that size may be a little bit hard to find but I would do a search anyway. I think you may have to make two cuts. One with a round over bit and a second with a cove bit on a router table with a fence and hand sand any little ridge that might be left between the cuts.

If you are not aware…..Cherry has a bad habit of burning when cut with a router; so make sure you bits are sharp and move at a steady and fairly quick pace. I surefire way to avoid burn marks (which are hard to sand out) is to make your first pass a little shallow and then make a clean up pass which should take out any burn marks and you can move fast enough to avoid new ones.

-- Les B, Oregon

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1912 posts in 610 days


#5 posted 07-21-2019 07:41 PM

if I were to build a bullnose ogee edge that is 1-1/2” thick,
this is how I would build it.

( X2 with Les on a router bit burning cherry ).
assuming that you are going to clear coat this table, it is so very imperative
that you watch the glue squeeze out. if you use a stain, the glue will prevent
the stain from working. “Rich” has mentioned using a fluorescent glue and a
black light to avoid or at least minimize this issue. (unfortunately, it seems to be
available only in the gallon size).
mechanical fasteners (screws or brads) may be the best method to fasten the lip to the table
with just spare amounts of glue on the inside edge to really prevent any glue issues.

,

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1912 posts in 610 days


#6 posted 07-21-2019 09:37 PM

if this is the profile that you need, this is how you can
make it with two router bits. but instead of buying the bullnose bit
for just a one-off application, the round-over bit will work just as well. (SMP).

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Jaxsun's profile

Jaxsun

14 posts in 1117 days


#7 posted 07-22-2019 07:36 AM

Thanks so much for the suggestions. And on the diagram of the stone tops, the circled one is correct. Thankyou John Smith for providing that! And the diagram of how you would build it for that detail is a great idea, although I already have some 8/4 cherry I planned on using. But it might be worth getting some 4/4 and doing it in 2 pieces. With this method I would only need to get a bigger ogee bit as mine are smaller. I have plenty of roundover bits that I could use to make the bullnose. I know cherry can want to burn easily so several shallow passes should prevent that. Thanks for your help gentlemen!

-- JACK'S SON

View SMP's profile

SMP

1302 posts in 353 days


#8 posted 07-22-2019 01:30 PM

One other piece of advice. I personally wouldn’t use the bullnose bit unless you have a planer. I have used bullnose bits on s4s lumber and the variations in thickness make it work sometimes, sometimes material too thin(not too bad), or worse the material is too thick and you get a bullnose with bead.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

205 posts in 174 days


#9 posted 07-22-2019 01:41 PM

Here is the bit(s) I used for the profile below.
I used a 1/4 round to finish the bullnose.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8702 posts in 3024 days


#10 posted 07-22-2019 03:00 PM

Maybe explain to your customer that you can compliment the stone detail and present a couple of
sample pieces for his approval.

Best of luck.

View Jaxsun's profile

Jaxsun

14 posts in 1117 days


#11 posted 07-23-2019 02:30 PM

https://photos.app.goo.gl/qCQ1XyPRGuxEEL9YA
I’m wondering if I could possibly use a cove bit on top and then form the bullnose underneath that cut? If I wanted to keep this edege profile in 1 piece..although It seems like more trouble almost…I just found this picture of the stone top I’m trying to match and it doesn’t look like it has much of a roundover on the top edge like an ogee bit has

-- JACK'S SON

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5487 posts in 2798 days


#12 posted 07-23-2019 02:41 PM

Experiment on scraps until you get the look you want.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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