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Saw blade comparison, request for, TS & BS

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Forum topic by Jack Lewis posted 07-20-2019 06:40 PM 554 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jack Lewis

472 posts in 1525 days


07-20-2019 06:40 PM

There is and has been many posts claiming one blade superior over another. Is there a comprehensive comparison between the major types of blades, noting the finish, ease of cut, life of sharpness, etc.

How good of a result is good enough in any particular situation?

There have been posts claiming one blade at 1/2 the price is equal in many of the situations. Is that because that poster is biased, familiar and satisfied with brand X v. brand Z? I am sure the higher priced blade wouldn’t or shouldn’t or shouldn’t do a comparison and publish adverse results. Is owning brand Z simply a status symbol tool?

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"


8 replies so far

View wncguy's profile

wncguy

445 posts in 2760 days


#1 posted 07-20-2019 06:55 PM

You might want to check out info that LJ Knotscott has published.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/46865

I’ve found that Scott has done research on several items & I never “felt” there was a bias. a lot of

-- Any man can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a Dad

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11694 posts in 3876 days


#2 posted 07-20-2019 07:12 PM

Jack, we all likely have our favorite TS blades and, our opinions on which ones are trash. It kinda depends on the kind of work you do and what you want from a blade. I don’t have a jointer so, my blades need to give me a glue ready surface. Most of my work is with mesquite, walnut or, maple. One of my saws is dedicated to rips and one is for cross cutting. And, I have a couple Skils for breaking down lumber. All my blades are Tenryu. They meet all my needs exceptionally well.
BS blades are a different ball of wax. I haven’t found one manufacturer to be demonstrably better than any other.
I’m sure others will swear by their favorites.
Good luck.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5635 posts in 2941 days


#3 posted 07-20-2019 07:58 PM

Ditto using Scott’s info on the TS blades. I agree with Gene on the BS blades, most of us have favorites we stick by but I’m not sure you can prove one is better than the other.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5620 posts in 3691 days


#4 posted 07-20-2019 10:27 PM

I agree completely with Knotscott. You have blades with large carbide teeth and laser cut plates (good) and cheap blades with small carbide teeth and stamped metal plates (not so good, but OK for construction work). A good blade can be re-sharpened . A not-so-good blade might be able to be sharpened once, but would be considered a throw-a-way blade. Of the many good blades on the market, the thing that makes one better than the other is how well the original grind was done. Forrest has been known for it’s fine diamond grit grind and it has been claimed that if you send any brand of blade to Forrest, it will be returned sharper than it was originally. So the one factor that separates one blade from another is the grind. I have a diamond blade grinding machine (Foley) that I use on my blades and I have noticed that a cheap blade when sharpened cuts much better than when new. A light touch-up on a $40 blade can transform it into a $100 blade.

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Andre

2693 posts in 2253 days


#5 posted 07-20-2019 11:04 PM

Ditto on T.S. blades! Just had 2 – 1/2” 3tpi blades made up by local sharpening shop, he had some 1/2” carbide tipped stock that would of cost approx. $170 to make one blade for my saw compared to the bahco stock for $15. So do the math, how many blades, new and sharp to equal one carbide?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

472 posts in 1525 days


#6 posted 07-20-2019 11:41 PM



Jack, we all likely have our favorite TS blades and, our opinions on which ones are trash. It kinda depends on the kind of work you do and what you want from a blade. I don t have a jointer so, my blades need to give me a glue ready surface. Most of my work is with mesquite, walnut or, maple. One of my saws is dedicated to rips and one is for cross cutting. And, I have a couple Skils for breaking down lumber. All my blades are Tenryu. They meet all my needs exceptionally well.
BS blades are a different ball of wax. I haven t found one manufacturer to be demonstrably better than any other.
I m sure others will swear by their favorites.
Good luck.

- Gene Howe

Gene;
We match types of woods and dedicated equipment exactly. I was looking at the glue surface on some cross grain purpleheart and mesquite today and could not visualize a better glue cut than with a resharpened Freud blade. My rip cuts are always glue ready. Which make me wonder if better is really better? Or just more expensive… Some of the rip cuts I really have to examine closely to determine if a pass on the jointer is necessary.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12866 posts in 2827 days


#7 posted 07-21-2019 05:25 AM

A lot of people swear by Ridge Carbide but I have no personal experience with them. They do seem to make beefy blades if that is what you want.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11694 posts in 3876 days


#8 posted 07-21-2019 04:31 PM


Jack, we all likely have our favorite TS blades and, our opinions on which ones are trash. It kinda depends on the kind of work you do and what you want from a blade. I don t have a jointer so, my blades need to give me a glue ready surface. Most of my work is with mesquite, walnut or, maple. One of my saws is dedicated to rips and one is for cross cutting. And, I have a couple Skils for breaking down lumber. All my blades are Tenryu. They meet all my needs exceptionally well.
BS blades are a different ball of wax. I haven t found one manufacturer to be demonstrably better than any other.
I m sure others will swear by their favorites.
Good luck.

- Gene Howe

Gene;
We match types of woods and dedicated equipment exactly. I was looking at the glue surface on some cross grain purpleheart and mesquite today and could not visualize a better glue cut than with a resharpened Freud blade. My rip cuts are always glue ready. Which make me wonder if better is really better? Or just more expensive… Some of the rip cuts I really have to examine closely to determine if a pass on the jointer is necessary.

- Jack Lewis

Jack, if it works for you, it don’t get no better. Both my saws are Shopsmiths and, for some reason, Freud blades just don’t cut it…so to speak. The guy in Phoenix that sharpens my blades recommended Tenryu about 15 years ago. I’ve been happy with them since.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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