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Forum topic by Karda posted 07-20-2019 06:57 AM 415 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1611 posts in 1001 days


07-20-2019 06:57 AM

I found this crotch cut off in my scraps and I need something to turn. I cut it before I started to do crotches so it was cut short what can I do with it. So far I have come up with cut the ends off and mount it between centers or cut a circle out of it on the bandsaw. The piece measures 10” long by 6” wide by 5” high. Any other ideas thanks Mike


21 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1588 posts in 2177 days


#1 posted 07-20-2019 01:30 PM

Mike, mount the piece using a spur at the center of the piece that’s on your saw table.. Remove some of the bark on the Y end, center it on your live center and turn a tenon and rough the outside shape. When satisfied with the shape, remove it and set up the turn the inside.

What you have there could be turned into something like these.

Well, big crap pile below. I’ve seen pictures disoriented before, but have never had it happen to me. These are the first. I went into my file and rotated them to the right, hoping when LJ got them they would be oriented properly. Nope, not the case.. Hopefully someone can help with proper orientation….

Anyway, Mike, try to leave some bark on the piece. It will give it character…..... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Ripper70

1294 posts in 1356 days


#2 posted 07-20-2019 02:15 PM

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Lazyman

3661 posts in 1835 days


#3 posted 07-20-2019 02:45 PM

I think that I would mount it on centers and turn it sort like the process in this video. This is the first of a 2 part video by Mike Peace that can help you understand the process. It is not exactly the same because I am suggesting that you turn it so that what is the top of your blank in the your pictures is the bottom of the bowl but close enough that you can use his approach. Unfortunately, in that orientation, it won’t leave any bark on the rim but you can wind up with a winged bowl that is nearly as wide as the blank. You will be hollowing in end grain so keep your tools sharp. Only question is whether you lathe is big enough to mount it in which case you may need to trim it to fit first. This is a handy technique for making bowls from branches and other odd shaped pieces that are usually not suitable for making bowls.

Note: if you do mount it as I suggest with the crotch as the bottom, use a spade or Forstner bit wide enough for your center to drill through the bark until you hit solid wood for a tight hold.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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mike02719

128 posts in 4233 days


#4 posted 07-20-2019 07:07 PM

From what I can see from here, I would mount it between the arms of the “y” with a wood worm screw ande cut a mortice for your chuck. Flip it over and see what you have there. If you don’t like it save it for the fireplace this winter. Stubs had some beautiful pics of what it could look like.

-- Mike, Massachusetts

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Karda

1611 posts in 1001 days


#5 posted 07-20-2019 07:17 PM

thanks for your ideas. I trimmed the ends and mounted it between centers. the mike peace video was a great help. I’ll let you know what It turns out to be. It won’t be my fire wood, no more wood stove. Thanks Mike

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mike02719

128 posts in 4233 days


#6 posted 07-20-2019 07:42 PM

Please don’t forget to post your results. That is what I like the most about this site. Good Luck

-- Mike, Massachusetts

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Karda

1611 posts in 1001 days


#7 posted 07-21-2019 04:06 AM

here is where I am. the ends are rounded the sides are still fairly straight theis what appears to be a bowl bottom. What to do now. what ever I do is going to be some long very hard work. What is going to happen to this if I continue to just round things out. I am real bad at seeing what a piece will look like after I turn it. An Al Furtado I am not

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2689 posts in 2582 days


#8 posted 07-21-2019 12:09 PM

Looking at those cracks; my first though was stop wasting your time unless happy to end up with smaller bowl than you originally wanted. On second thought you need to improve your sharpening skills and improve your turning procedures getting rid of those tool marks. If don’t know how cannot help maybe others will chime in.

-- Bill

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Nubsnstubs

1588 posts in 2177 days


#9 posted 07-21-2019 12:49 PM

Mike, you missed the center by about 1/4-1/2”to the left. measure the space from the bark to center on both sides, mark the spot where the live center should have been mounted. Now you could shift the live center to the right, and cut along the top edge near the headstock. When the bark is the same length on both sides, you’ll know it’s centered. Establish another tenon. When a new centered tenon is done, remove the old tenon until it’s a small nub and remove with a chisel.

Those cracks Bill mentioned can be filled with CA. They don’t look like an unsafe hazard to me, but, I live on the edge anyway. You’ll never know until you try it, and if it kills you, you won’t be around to remember if it was a hazard. In case any one thinks I have these, “Hold my beer” moments, NO, I do not. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3661 posts in 1835 days


#10 posted 07-21-2019 01:46 PM

It looks to me like you made the part that was sitting down on your bench or table the bottom? I would invert it and put the tenon where the crotch is formed. This will give you the most dramatic results with high wings similar to the lighter bowl that Jerry showed. Sort of envision a semicircle with the bottom at the crotch. With the flat side as your bottom, I think that the best you can do is a wide but relatively flat bowl. If you keep that orientation, you might as well cut off most of the waste with a a band or chain saw to save yourself some time and trouble.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Lazyman

3661 posts in 1835 days


#11 posted 07-21-2019 01:58 PM

Here’s what I mean

If you do it the other way, these are your options.

If you go with the red profile, you might as well cut off the wings first. With the black profile, cut off the top to save time.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

1611 posts in 1001 days


#12 posted 07-21-2019 05:13 PM

you have given me a lot to think about. When I quit last night I was wondering if I should cut some off. Question is is where. I was thinking of doweling those cracks but they don’t seem to be to big or deep. Jerry i am not worried about its killing me it the pain that not killing me would cause. You better believe I am wearing my face shield on this one. The first time I touched a tool to the piece I heard a load whack. A big piece of bark came off and hit the back board.
Jerry about the centers, could I trim one end or the other to move the center. I think I will use Lazymans top diagram and cut the top down.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2380 posts in 2437 days


#13 posted 07-21-2019 06:57 PM

I was going to suggest a hollow form but I dont think you do any yet. There was also the opportunity to use a glue block to give more room and save a little more wood, but …

Work on getting a smooth curve from the foot to the rim , with the foot being just larger than your tenon. Keep an eye on the cracks, they will need some ca glue when the od roughing is complete.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1588 posts in 2177 days


#14 posted 07-21-2019 07:13 PM

Mike, if you are trying to save bark on a piece, being off center will leave you with one side having a short length of bark on one side and the other will be longer. No way to fix it other than shifting the center towards the longer strip of bark.
If you are going to use Nathan’s diagram, you can still have bark on the outside and still have a round bowl longer that the width of it. You just need to gather some confidence to jump into something new. Like natural edge winged or eared bowls. and, if you did make one about the size of your head, you could use it as a hat…

In the pictures I posted, the piece in the back and on my head was an elbowed limb that was only about 5” diameter and about 8” long. The finish size now is 2 1/2” high 4 3/4” wide in the middle and is 5 3/4” tall on the wings and 7 1/2” long across the top. I’ll bet that the first time you got 4 numbers on a round piece. Usually there is only depth and diameter. ............... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Karda

1611 posts in 1001 days


#15 posted 07-21-2019 07:35 PM

your right I don’t do much hollowing, usually only bowls wide at the base than top. all I have for hollowing is a 15MM carbide.
I am not worried about the bark, I’ve lost some already. On second thought I may cut the top off and go for the shallow long look. I am approaching this like everything else, terrified of ruining it yet it was headed for the fire pit so no loss. That my biggest obstacles.

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