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Best Ridgid TS for the money? 3612/R4512/TS2424

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Forum topic by BartHJarvis posted 07-17-2019 04:20 PM 490 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BartHJarvis

3 posts in 38 days


07-17-2019 04:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: ridgid question tablesaw

My garage workshop desperately needs an upgrade from the nigh-unusable 8” TS it currently has. I’ve seen some good deals around on big cabinet saws, but unfortunately 220/240 isn’t a possibility for me right now.

There are a number of postings for various Dewalt jobsite saws and Craftsman 137’s, but what’s caught my eye recently has been a few Ridgid’s at an auction that ends tonight. There’s:

- A R4512 that will probably end up around $200
- A TS2424 that will probably go for around $150
- A 3612 for $250 straight-up
- Or alternatively, an old Delta 62-044

All 3 of those are in my price range, so mostly what I’m concerned with is having a decent fence and compatibility for a riving knife. To be honest, any would be VAST improvements over what I currently have, but I figured I’d ask the hive mind to steer me in the right direction. Thanks all!


9 replies so far

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2062 posts in 2158 days


#1 posted 07-17-2019 04:48 PM

looking at LeeWay Workshop (Shark Guard) of the ones listed the R4512 is the only one that accepts a riving knife, the others would have splitters, I don’t know about the Delta, but I would make sure on all of the ones you listed, to see if parts are still available.

Of those my non-knowledgeable choice would be the 4512 as the most upgradeable….

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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SonOfMI

26 posts in 1495 days


#2 posted 07-17-2019 05:03 PM

The 4512 had a flaw with the trunnions. It’s well documented here plus I have first hand experience with it. Supposedly the flaw has been fixed and saws sold nowadays don’t have the problem. I sold mine after I had it repaired.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1426 posts in 3304 days


#3 posted 07-17-2019 05:44 PM

The 3612 & the 2424 are the same saw, the 3612 just has the rails slid over so that there is 12” to the left of the blade and 36” to the right, 2424 is 24” on each side. They are also the same as some of the Craftsman 113 saws. It’s the older saw before they went Orange, I’ve had my 3612 for over 12 years, and am very happy with it, but if the Table Saw fairy dropped a bag of money at my feet id likely look for a saw with the riving knife, but the MicroJig splitter serves me well, and I’m fanatical about safety process & using the best PPE.

For $250, there should be a fair bit of other accessories with it, Herc-U-lift, & Miter bar are standard with the saw along with the fence. Any blades or sleds built for it would be a bonus.

I’ve modified mine with the micro jig splitter insert, router table wing, and enclosed the back of the saw and added a 4” dust chute underneath for DC. Still running the stock style belts, have not had a need to consider a link belt & pulley change, the TS passes the nickle test without them. I don’t abuse the saw, have not really ever had a cut that I couldn’t make on it, even ripping some old beams, just use smart feed and care. I check alignment regularly but have maybe only had to make adjustments twice in the past 12 years.

I like the saw that I have but I’m also happy with my Hondas too, so there’s that…

Good luck

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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BartHJarvis

3 posts in 38 days


#4 posted 07-17-2019 06:13 PM



The 3612 & the 2424 are the same saw, the 3612 just has the rails slid over so that there is 12” to the left of the blade and 36” to the right, 2424 is 24” on each side

Thanks, Chef. I’ve read about other fence rails being able to slide over – is that the case with these or are they fixed? I think the setup of the 3612 better for my shop, but if they’re effectively the same, I’d be inclined just to get the 2424 and deal with it.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

679 posts in 366 days


#5 posted 07-17-2019 06:40 PM

I myself would stay away from table saw tops that are grated. Knowing me I’d be pinching my fingers sliding between the grated top and the wood. The smooth solid table saw top is a plus.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1426 posts in 3304 days


#6 posted 07-19-2019 01:53 PM



Thanks, Chef. I ve read about other fence rails being able to slide over – is that the case with these or are they fixed? I think the setup of the 3612 better for my shop, but if they re effectively the same, I d be inclined just to get the 2424 and deal with it.

- BartHJarvis

Bart, the rails are held in place by capturing the head of a hex bolt in a channel on the rail & you align those bolts to the holes in the saw to put a lock washer and nut on to attach the rails. If you purchase new scale tapes, 0 to 12” R to L, and a 0 to 36” L to R you can easily slide the rails over to make a 2424 into a 3612. You will need to put in a spacer to at the end of the rails to keep them from flexing, and it can be just a beam like the saw is sold or you can put in a shop made top, me I put in a router wing, you can see it here in my projects

As for the webbed wings, I’ve never pinched a finger in the past 15 or so years since I’ve had it. I actually often will use my TS as a bench and the webs allow me to be able to clamp things down easily. I additionally keep 2 bungee cords hanging off the webs, the web cross pieces are below the table surface, and the cords are very helpful when I need to support of secure DC hoses.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3390 posts in 1029 days


#7 posted 07-19-2019 02:23 PM

I think instead of just saying rigid, like they were the end all be all of power tools, you describe aspects of a saw that were important to you.

IE: cast or stamped steel wings, riving knife, etc etc etc.

With that limited list, you are leaving a lot of really good contractor saws laying by the side of the road.

You might also want to add info on where you are geographically. Something like SW Ohio, don’t need an address, just a general location. You can add this to your profile, and it could put you in touch with others who have a saw to sell.

I imagine some members here have “extra” TS’s that they can’t/won’t ship, so they would be local sales only, and if you put wants down, you might get a better deal, and a much better saw.

Welcome to Lumber Jocks.

-- Think safe, be safe

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BartHJarvis

3 posts in 38 days


#8 posted 07-19-2019 02:43 PM

Thanks SteveN. I’ve updated my profile to reflect that I’m in Central Ohio.

I ended up passing on both of the auction saws (the TS2424 and the 4512), partially thanks to the advice about the trunions, but also because they went for far more than I wanted to pay based on what I’ve read here ($400 and $350 respectively, after fees).

I’m heading over today to take a look at the Delta posted above. If it runs smooth and the Unifence is in good shape, I might pull the trigger. It’s tough sorting through the mountains of Craftsman 137.xxxx’s on FB/CL and while I’m willing to drive, it’s tough knowing what’s worth driving for.

View curliejones's profile

curliejones

186 posts in 2721 days


#9 posted 07-19-2019 03:31 PM

I’ve been happy with my Ridgid 3612, though I wish I could add a riving knife. The fence is decent and slotted to accept accessories. I often use a sled for cross cuts and I did close in the back somewhat to aid in dust collection. I added an outfeed area by bolting to the saw under the webbed wings and left a cutout for tilting when needed. To the right of the right wing, I took out the rod and filled the space with a router table. I have the router on a base nearby and can drop it in when I need it. The router plate hole , meanwhile is filled with a plywood blank to have more solid area for the ever-present “stuff”, e.g. featherboards, push stick.

-- Like Guy Clark sez - "Sometimes I use my head, Sometimes I get a bigger hammer"

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