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Forum topic by bmwwd6 posted 07-17-2019 02:49 PM 410 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bmwwd6

3 posts in 31 days


07-17-2019 02:49 PM

I have tried every method I can think of to get the epoxy stains off of my pecan wood from some worm holes I was filling and I’m having no luck. I’ve gone over it with a router sled, used a card scraper, and a 60 grit belt sander multiple times. Is there something I did wrong? I’m so close to finishing this slab but I can’t get these dye marks around the holes out. Any advice is greatly appreciated.


15 replies so far

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RobHannon

287 posts in 978 days


#1 posted 07-17-2019 03:02 PM

What did you use to dye the epoxy? Sanding sealer/shellac prior to applying the epoxy probably would have helped with clean up. At this point I think all you can do is try sanding down deeper and hope they lessen.

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Rich

4677 posts in 1037 days


#2 posted 07-17-2019 03:11 PM

What did you use to color the epoxy? I use a black pigment from System Three that’s specifically made to color epoxy and have never had problems with the color seeping into the board.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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John Smith

1912 posts in 610 days


#3 posted 07-17-2019 03:21 PM

just an option:
grind out the offending color with a dremel, router or similar tool
and seal with clear epoxy. then, if you want, you can use a colored epoxy
or a wood paste made from the wood dust you already have and epoxy
that would accentuate and blend in with the other “natural” defects.

what you are experiencing is similar to ink soaking into a paper towel.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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Rich

4677 posts in 1037 days


#4 posted 07-17-2019 03:40 PM


grind out the offending color with a dremel, router or similar tool
and seal with clear epoxy. then, if you want, you can use a colored epoxy
or a wood paste made from the wood dust you already have and epoxy
that would accentuate and blend in with the other “natural” defects.

- John Smith

That’s awful advice. There is no way that would result in a repair that doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb. I could gouge those out, fill them properly, and color and grain match to blend with the surrounding area but it would take me at least a half hour to an hour to do each one. Not to mention the hundreds of hours of practice it’s taken me to acquire that skill.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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RobHannon

287 posts in 978 days


#5 posted 07-17-2019 04:34 PM


That s awful advice. There is no way that would result in a repair that doesn t stick out like a sore thumb. I could gouge those out, fill them properly, and color and grain match to blend with the surrounding area but it would take me at least a half hour to an hour to do each one. Not to mention the hundreds of hours of practice it s taken me to acquire that skill.

- Rich

Did you have another solution? I can’t think of any possible way to remove a set pigment from wood that doesn’t involve removing the wood itself. John’s suggestion is certainly labor intensive, but short of ebonizing the whole piece I think any fix will be quite labor intensive. Thinning down the wood might work depending on how deep the stain goes and how much thickness he can afford to leave.

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Manitario

2778 posts in 3330 days


#6 posted 07-17-2019 04:36 PM

The dye has seeped into the surrounding wood and there is no easy way to remove it without removing the affected wood. You could try (on a practice board!!) using a small amount of bleach or oxalic acid over the dyed area, this would work for many of the water soluble dyes available. Not sure if it would work once it is in epoxy.

It looks like you’re making a live edge project. The other option (rather than cutting/sanding back the edge) would be to use a small gouge at each of the discoloured areas to gouge out the colour and then blend the gouged areas into the overall shape of the edge with sanding and carving.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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Rich

4677 posts in 1037 days


#7 posted 07-17-2019 04:49 PM


Did you have another solution? I can t think of any possible way to remove a set pigment from wood that doesn t involve removing the wood itself. John s suggestion is certainly labor intensive, but short of ebonizing the whole piece I think any fix will be quite labor intensive. Thinning down the wood might work depending on how deep the stain goes and how much thickness he can afford to leave.

- RobHannon

I can’t offer a solution when I have no idea how deep that color has seeped into the wood. What I said was intended to warn the OP that following John’s advice will result in a worse situation and it would be a huge mistake to try to do it that way.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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bmwwd6

3 posts in 31 days


#8 posted 07-17-2019 04:52 PM

I used Systems Three Epoxy Pigment (https://www.amazon.com/System-Three-3201A06-Pigment-Coating/dp/B00UVGZ63O/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=system+three+black+pigment+epoxy&qid=1563382169&s=gateway&sr=8-2). Maybe I mixed too much in with the epoxy, but I only did a few drops. I feel helpless now, the only thing I guess I can do is keep hitting it with a belt sander.

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bmwwd6

3 posts in 31 days


#9 posted 07-17-2019 05:50 PM

Debating about just flipping the slab over and starting over : (

If I do this, I don’t want to make the same mistake twice. Is the key thing I missed not spraying lacquer prior to pouring the epoxy? I’m planning to finish with Rubio Monocoat, so I assume the lacquer can easily be sanded off prior to applying the Rubio?

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Madmark2

475 posts in 1035 days


#10 posted 07-17-2019 06:21 PM

Paint it.

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Rich

4677 posts in 1037 days


#11 posted 07-17-2019 06:32 PM

I’ve never seen that happen, but I do work with mesquite, so it’s probably just a difference in the texture of the wood.

I wish I could offer more help.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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pottz

5749 posts in 1432 days


#12 posted 07-17-2019 06:34 PM



Paint it.

- Madmark2


yeah id go with black,should solve the problem-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1302 posts in 353 days


#13 posted 07-17-2019 06:44 PM



Debating about just flipping the slab over and starting over : (

If I do this, I don t want to make the same mistake twice. Is the key thing I missed not spraying lacquer prior to pouring the epoxy? I m planning to finish with Rubio Monocoat, so I assume the lacquer can easily be sanded off prior to applying the Rubio?

- bmwwd6

I was going to mention just flip it over. Kind of funny to me people filling wormholes. Seems like just yesterday people were creating fake wormholes with nails and other tools, lol

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

774 posts in 1550 days


#14 posted 07-18-2019 01:15 AM

Why do you want to use black epoxy? If you just use the clear, it will blend in better than black, even if it doesn’t wick into the surrounding wood.

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Knockonit

594 posts in 649 days


#15 posted 07-18-2019 01:30 AM

maybe make a paste of vinegar and baking soda, sometimes a lemon or lime juice may substitute, make a paste and give it a go, or try some wood bleach, hard to say what works, getting black out of anything is gonna be tough to say the least, might have to attempt a colorizing of it, use a scrape and put some of the dye no it and see if you can work something up. otherwise, painting is sounding like good advise. or, come up with some sort of design to remove them, say a bowtie, some round of diffrent size dowels ect, just throwing stuff out there. best of luck
Rj in az

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