LumberJocks

In home Tool evaluation, Austin Texas

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Dansaw posted 07-16-2019 11:25 PM 996 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Dansaw's profile

Dansaw

19 posts in 1695 days


07-16-2019 11:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw miter saw tablesaw biscuit joiner

I am pretty much a novice woodworker with a decent home shop. I have numerous power tools that I have acquired but not 100% sure on their condition or set up. I called my local WoodCraft and got the kid that could careless about helping out with a solution. I am looking for an experienced woodworker with power tool set up and trouble shooting knowledge. Fence alignment on Table saw, possible bearing replacement on Band saw, Blade wear evaluation, Chop Saw evaluation and so on. I am capable of many mechanical endeavors but can’t tell if my Miter saw noises are normal or the bearing needs replacement. Is this a thing or am I giving someone a business idea here?


17 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7434 posts in 2646 days


#1 posted 07-16-2019 11:49 PM

Fence alignment on Table saw, possible bearing replacement on Band saw, Blade wear evaluation, Chop Saw evaluation and so on. I am capable of many mechanical endeavors but can’t tell if my Miter saw noises are normal or the bearing needs replacement.
- Dansaw

My motto for bearings – When in doubt, swap them out :)

Seriously, just dig on in and do it yourself. There is a boatload of info on the net: tutorials, how-to’s, videos, user forums (like here), etc… that will walk you through most of what you would ever want to do. As an added benefit, you become intimately familiar with your machines, how they work, and what to keep an eye on in terms of maintenance and keeping them in good working condition. It’s not hard, and you will thank yourself in the long run.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5332 posts in 2756 days


#2 posted 07-16-2019 11:57 PM

+ 1 for what Brad said and a question. What was it you thought someone at Woodcraft could do?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View SMP's profile

SMP

1302 posts in 353 days


#3 posted 07-17-2019 12:35 AM

Look for a woodworkers guild in your town. Then you can meet some likeminded individuals and am sure some people would help you out. Good luck!

View Dansaw's profile

Dansaw

19 posts in 1695 days


#4 posted 07-19-2019 10:02 PM

Thanks to all. I agree, I do most things myself but wanted to enlist an expert. Woodcraft had offered this service a few years back for setting up new equipment. I will have to post some videos to show why I want other eyes. Table saw has a Forrest blade that has been used, and has slight wobble when about to stop running. Mitre saw and circular saw are doing the same. Band Saw makes a god awful noise and not sure if it’s set up or bearings…..I will get after it. thanks

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4588 posts in 4189 days


#5 posted 07-19-2019 10:17 PM

Does the local high school have shop? Can talk to the instructor – - they have seen every abuse a 14 year old can do to the tools, and keep them running. He can get you going. Of course YouTube is a great resource. there is the obligatory Bandsaw video from Alex Snodgass as he teaches at all the woodworking shows. it is the ‘go to’.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

The Wood Whisperer did a video… and… he had invited Alex to his shop. – - and he goes in better detail, and this video is only 8 minutes.. the original is 30

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxVyKsbuwZQ

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View Delete's profile

Delete

439 posts in 819 days


#6 posted 07-19-2019 11:11 PM

Quit often it is not the blades, but that should be the first thing you check, use a dial indicator for the most precise measurements. Bad bearings and belts will produce vibration, more so at start-up and shut-down, more so if your machine is on rubber feet. Short belts cause less vibration, long belts such as on a table saw, with back hanging motor produce lots of vibration at start-up and shut-down. Link belts, as mentioned by other LJ’s, produce much less vibration. Bearings are relatively easy , if there is any play, leaking grease, noise such as scraping, or less than smooth revolution change the bearings.

A smooth running bandsaw should not make to much noise. Check the guides, set there clearance using strips of regular 20 lb. paper. Rotate the wheels, if your blade contacts the guides off and on, you may have problems elsewhere, out of round wheels, bad tires, or bad bearings. These are also relatively easy to check. 14” and smaller bandsaws with the motor in the base have long belts and can produce vibration, a link belt will help.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3353 posts in 1021 days


#7 posted 07-20-2019 12:30 AM

Austin Tx isn’t nowhere. I imagine you have woodworkers close by, more so if a WoodCraft is thriving. Evidently you can rule out WoodCraft, but looks like maybe a club nearby

Plenty of how to on You Tube, thing is there some of them are Yahoo’s. Places like the magazines, and places selling tools may have A to Z on tuning up, just about anything. Several of the publications have stickied how to’s like this one from Wood for a contractor Table Saw

Here there is plenty of help, but we can’t see your tools. If you watch something, that brings up questions, cite the source, and ask about what you are having trouble with.

-- Think safe, be safe

View WoodenDreams's profile (online now)

WoodenDreams

661 posts in 358 days


#8 posted 07-20-2019 07:31 AM

check to see if there is a woodworking club in your area. they’ll be glad to help you out. or put you in the right direction

View coxhaus's profile

coxhaus

139 posts in 1342 days


#9 posted 07-21-2019 06:46 AM

Why don’t you post what tools you have? There is a Dewalt repair shop in Austin if you have a Dewalt Miter saw.

I am no expert wood worker or tool repair guy but I fixed up 3 Delta table saws, a Atlas drill press, a bandsaw and a couple of jointers. I almost forgot the floor mortiser. I studied each tool 1 at a time. And made each tool work 1 at a time. They all required different levels of repair. The bandsaw took a while as I thought is was the motor since it was running hot. I had a motor shop Hamilton Electric in Austin Texas go through it. It turned out the motor side panel had moved in a small amount which caused the bandsaw belt to barely rub on the bottom wheel. This was overloading the motor causing it to run hot. All I had to do was add washers to space the motor out to fix it. It took me a while to figure it out. I don’t think this is a show up and fix. You may be better off working on the forums some to get you started.

The last year I have been restoring an old American made garden tractor. The spindles were shot on the mower deck and 1 of them was broken. I painted a trailer to match. Now I am upgrading my air compressor to have easy access to air and to paint better.

View farmfromkansas's profile

farmfromkansas

89 posts in 61 days


#10 posted 07-22-2019 12:55 AM

If I had a bandsaw making noise, I would loosen the guides, and tension the blade and turn the wheels. Probably the noise is from guides improperly adjusted. Bandsaws need adjustment often. Circular blades often wobble at slow speeds, and run true at speed. If you plan to mess with a table saw or miter saw, unplug the saw before fooling with the blade. Then turn the blade, and see if you can feel any roughness or play.

View Delete's profile

Delete

439 posts in 819 days


#11 posted 07-22-2019 01:29 AM



If I had a bandsaw making noise, I would loosen the guides, and tension the blade and turn the wheels. Probably the noise is from guides improperly adjusted. Bandsaws need adjustment often. Circular blades often wobble at slow speeds, and run true at speed. If you plan to mess with a table saw or miter saw, unplug the saw before fooling with the blade. Then turn the blade, and see if you can feel any roughness or play.

- farmfromkansas

Maybe I am misunderstanding what you are trying to say, but the only thing I agree with there is that you should unplug a machine before working on it.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2778 posts in 3330 days


#12 posted 07-22-2019 03:58 AM

The problem with you getting an “expert” to set stuff up for you is that you’ll have no knowledge or ability to adjust or fix the tools when they inevitably go out of alignment etc. again. Keeping machines aligned and set up properly is not a one time deal. Nor is troubleshooting strange sounds.
Learning how to do this is as much a part of woodworking as learning how to sharpen or measure etc.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3353 posts in 1021 days


#13 posted 07-22-2019 04:35 AM

Manitario. while I agree that having knowledge to do these yourself is valuable. I am thinking first time, it is wise for some to seek help to assure they do it correctly. I wouldn’t expect they weren’t going to be watching, or even recording to have a reference. I have been asked to do this a number of times in the past, I’ve never been asked to do it twice by the same person though.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2778 posts in 3330 days


#14 posted 07-23-2019 12:18 AM



I have been asked to do this a number of times in the past, I ve never been asked to do it twice by the same person though.

- therealSteveN

Lol, you must be a good teacher! I agree, a real person showing you how to set stuff up is super helpful. The OP made it seem though like he just wanted someone to come and set everything up for him which I think would be counterproductive.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Dansaw's profile

Dansaw

19 posts in 1695 days


#15 posted 07-23-2019 01:15 AM

I really appreciate all the good responses. I will post some videos of what I am hearing and seeing in my shop. I was wanting to learn the specifics of my tools so I can be self sufficient in the future. Just like the original post, you only get so much from what is written. You don’t know, what you don’t know!

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com