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Designing a floating platform bed

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Forum topic by TEK73 posted 07-15-2019 10:03 PM 316 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TEK73

119 posts in 154 days


07-15-2019 10:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question beech planer tablesaw joining rustic modern

Hi

I’m working on this bed design.

The idea is that the bed should look floating when you are standing (or ideally also sitting) in the same room (that would say a couple of meters away), and that the madrass should be lowered into the “platform” with approx 10cm.
I think the deisign I have planned should work in that regard.

The bed is for a madrass that is 80cm x 200cm.
The frame is 20cm wide and approx 4cm thick. Everything will be made of beech.

However, I would really like some input on one of my joints.

The joint in question is the one shown on this picture:

Due to the lumber I have access to, they have to be butt joined as shown on this picture. I do not have enough material to do a mortise/tenon joint.
I also think that the “platform” of the bed will have to be joined togheter so that it makes a sturdy frame (even it will not be used as bed, I assume people will sit down on it, step on it and so on).
The other end of the bed will be placed against the wall – so the plan is to use huge screws there as they will not be visible.

How would you have joined these togheter?

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin


13 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

774 posts in 1550 days


#1 posted 07-15-2019 10:19 PM

Two points: If I understand correctly, the planks around the perimeter will be outside of the mattress and exposed. For me, the way I sleep, I would not like that. I would be banging my arms, legs, or head on it all night long. Just my opinion. It might not be a problem for others.
For the butt joints, all you have to do is use floating tenons or large dowels. Don’t try to use glue alone, It will fail.

View pottz's profile

pottz

5749 posts in 1432 days


#2 posted 07-15-2019 11:20 PM



Two points: If I understand correctly, the planks around the perimeter will be outside of the mattress and exposed. For me, the way I sleep, I would not like that. I would be banging my arms, legs, or head on it all night long. Just my opinion. It might not be a problem for others.
For the butt joints, all you have to do is use floating tenons or large dowels. Don t try to use glue alone, It will fail.

- bilyo


+1 on the joinery and i agree about the perimeter,those beds look trendy but getting in and out of bed id have bruises myself-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

119 posts in 154 days


#3 posted 07-15-2019 11:52 PM

Thanks for the input.
The shape is selected, and will be according to the design.
I do however take your point and will take a second look at how mutch the madrass should be lowered into the bed.
In the current design the madrass is lowered apprix 10cm into the frame, that should leave about half of the madrass above the frame.
Maybe it should just be lowered 5cm into the frame (it has to be some so that the madrass will not slide around.

I have some 22mm diameter round stock. Maybe a good, and easy, solution would be to make two big dowels of those?

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

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bilyo

774 posts in 1550 days


#4 posted 07-16-2019 12:12 AM

I would use a minimum of three dowels in each joint. Four would be even better.

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

119 posts in 154 days


#5 posted 07-16-2019 12:34 AM

So, if I do tree 22mm dowels that is 10cm deep i to each side and attached using glue and draw bored pins on each side – as well as glue on the joints itself – that should make a quite strong joint.
And the draw bored pins should help getting a tight fit, something I need as I do not have any clamps that may span 220cm

Sounds good?

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

View SMP's profile

SMP

1302 posts in 353 days


#6 posted 07-16-2019 01:35 AM



So, if I do tree 22mm dowels that is 10cm deep i to each side and attached using glue and draw bored pins on each side – as well as glue on the joints itself – that should make a quite strong joint.
And the draw bored pins should help getting a tight fit, something I need as I do not have any clamps that may span 220cm

Sounds good?

- TEK73

I think you are misunderstanding draw bore pins, those would be if you were doing mortise and temon, but you are doing dowels instead. Also I would recommend some shin guards(football), i used to have a futon that had an edge like that and i still have scars on my shins.

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bilyo

774 posts in 1550 days


#7 posted 07-16-2019 01:46 AM

+1 It is not clear to me what you are proposing to do with draw bored pins unless you propose to use them to “pull” the dowels into the holes.
An easier way to get the joints tight is to use small clamps to clamp a block a few inches away from the joint and use that to place another clamp across the joint to pull it tight. You might need to use a second clamp on the bottom to get even pressure.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1124 posts in 1557 days


#8 posted 07-16-2019 01:50 AM

Dowels, definitely .

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

563 posts in 1067 days


#9 posted 07-16-2019 12:43 PM

I would suggest using dowels for alignment and would consider using something like this:
https://www.rockler.com/tite-joint-fastener?sid=V9146?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla&utm_campaign=PL&gclid=CjwKCAjw67XpBRBqEiwA5RCocR-Cv-OYdiIB6HVt9UZjJytq3gH3qGFD55lsQVOMKYozZksQjLzaCxoCGVQQAvD_BwE

to hold the joint tight. Using this type of fastener also allows the pieces to be knock-down for transport.

I built a similar bed and the king size mattress floats on top. I added a few small pieces of drawer liner to keep it from moving. The shelf is around 12” wide and we have no problems getting in and out. My shelf My shelf had an overhang to make it look thicker so I was able to secure that joint with a piece of 3/4 ply and large wood screws. No glue. That bed can only be moved in pieces.

-- Sawdust Maker

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

119 posts in 154 days


#10 posted 07-16-2019 01:27 PM

Thanks for all input.
I have just made a jig for drilling the dowel holes and have just drilled one of the corners.
The result is a joint that feels dead steady and very sturdy.

I will make the rest of the corners now, and then I will have to decide if I should make a «knock-down» solution or glue it all up.
It’s just for a singel bed (200×80cm madrass) so having a fixed frame is doable.

But I have to decide. With glue I will try to make the joints almost invisible (the wood direction will give it away dough), but if it’s a knock-down solution I think I will make the joints visible, for example buy sanding each part separatly and softing the edges before putting it together.

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

View pottz's profile

pottz

5749 posts in 1432 days


#11 posted 07-16-2019 01:42 PM

that looks good those dowels are more than enough.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1124 posts in 1557 days


#12 posted 07-20-2019 12:51 PM

Dowels looking great, nice jig.
Long pole clamps would be handy but probably not necessary.

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

119 posts in 154 days


#13 posted 07-22-2019 05:47 AM

I ended up using a simular solution to the one suggested by LittleShaver.

I got a threaded bar and cut it to size.
I drilled a hole in the center dowel and I drilled holes for fastening the nuts as well as some washers that I bended to shape.
I do not have a picture now, and I’m on my way on holyday..
Anyway, the whole bed is knock-down, if needed.

The rest of the bed is mostley done, just applying some finish now.

From a test assembly:

Bottom parts inserted with shellac:

Frame inserted with boiled linseed oil:

The receiver has tested the bed a couple of nights before I took it apart and did the final finish. Seems ti work as it should :-)

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

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