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What do you use in your HVLP guns?

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Forum topic by Boochiee posted 07-15-2019 05:57 PM 284 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Boochiee

30 posts in 185 days


07-15-2019 05:57 PM

I am looking to buy a few cans of lacquer / stain or whatever to finish a few projects. I am not really sure what I can use with my HVLP gun but I really want to get it started this weekend. I’ve been out of the hobby for the last couple of months and really need to finish a couple things!

The videos I watch people thin things down so I am guessing the chalk paint I bought would be a stupid idea to use with the HVLP gun. It’s just a cheap 20-25 dollar gun, the purple one.

When using lacquer do I need to thin it? Any links to what you may recommend would be great!


6 replies so far

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TDSpade

115 posts in 2870 days


#1 posted 07-15-2019 06:34 PM

I spray Deft brushing lacquer cut 50/50 with lacquer thinner. There are a lot different formulas on how to mix lacquer, but this work for me.

Also I don’t even try to spray when it’s over 80 degrees.

Keep pressure as low as possible to avoid to much over spray. Kinda tricky because you want good atomization.

I use the purple gun have 2 of them. I have never used paint with them. The purple gun is prone to rust when used with water borne finishes.

-- For every expert, there is an equal and opposite expert.

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Rich

4701 posts in 1043 days


#2 posted 07-15-2019 07:05 PM

I use CAB Acrylic lacquer and pre-cat from Sherwin Williams. Because of the heat here in the desert, I find I get a better finish if I put in about 10 to 15 percent retarder thinner. It’s a thinner that evaporates several times slower than regular lacquer thinner. The Sherwin Williams retarder thinner is K27, although other companies sell their own labels.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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Boochiee

30 posts in 185 days


#3 posted 07-15-2019 07:37 PM

Dang, unfortunately it won’t be around 80 or under for a while here. What would be another option? Some sort of wipe on or brushed?

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PPK

1476 posts in 1263 days


#4 posted 07-15-2019 07:42 PM

Viscosity will determine what you can and can’t spray. I’ve had good luck with spraying most anything. What you do have to watch out for though is that you don’t over thin certain products. For instance, waterborne polyurethane says not to thin at all, but upon pressing the manufacture, I found that you can thin it with about 12% water.

Spraying takes practice to get the air pressure, needle movement, spray pattern right. Practice on some cardboard to get the hang of it.

-- Pete

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Rich

4701 posts in 1043 days


#5 posted 07-15-2019 07:50 PM


Dang, unfortunately it won t be around 80 or under for a while here. What would be another option? Some sort of wipe on or brushed?

- Boochiee

Eighty degrees is not a problem. Add some thinner, preferably a retarder thinner like I described above and spray away. I have sprayed lacquer when it was in the mid nineties in the shop without an issue.

Humidity is a far bigger issue with lacquer than temperature. Because lacquer dries so fast, it can trap moisture and create a white blush. It’s easy to fix, just use some retarder thinner to re-dissolve the finish and the moisture can evaporate. Again, some retarder thinner in the product when you spray it can help mitigate those problems.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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OSU55

2381 posts in 2443 days


#6 posted 07-15-2019 08:09 PM

First get a Ford #4 viscosity cup so you can measure yourself. Not very expensive. Here is a good viscosity chart and tip size recommendation. Cheap guns have 2 major shortfalls 1) no needle/tip selection, only what the gun came with, 2) cap design, which doesnt atomize as well. Thinning and higher pressure can make up for a lot of it, but waterbornes typically are restricted to ~10%.

Get some finishes and cardboard, some sample boards of wood you like to use, and start practicing. A hand plane or #80 cabinet scraper are great for removing dried finish and getting a new surface to finish again. The more time spent trying different things now means fewer surprises once you commit finish to a project. I’ve finished and scraped a lot of boards testing different things out. Get a notebook or computer and keep detailed notes of what did and did not work.

Highly recommend some reference finishing books by Flexner and Jewitt. Spraying is only part of it (and perfect spray jobs hard to get). Most so-so spray jobs can be saved by working the resulting finish, but making compatibility mistakes means starting over , or poor choices can result in a drab look, etc. Build your knowledge base.

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