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Beveling Rot board for fence

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Forum topic by RCWoodworks posted 07-15-2019 01:55 PM 322 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RCWoodworks

13 posts in 158 days


07-15-2019 01:55 PM

I want to bevel so 2×6 Rot board for my fence. What are some quick ways of accomplishing this. Hand plane? Circular saw? Electric plainer?


12 replies so far

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GR8HUNTER

6338 posts in 1163 days


#1 posted 07-15-2019 02:10 PM

IMO i would put Z channel on top

or just rip on table saw GR8 idea John & SMP :<)))))))))))))))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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John Smith

1920 posts in 613 days


#2 posted 07-15-2019 02:13 PM

about how many linear feet do you have to do ?
how much material do you want to remove for the bevel ?
“quick” would be the table saw.
IMO, the circular saw and electric planer would be the most
labor intensive with the least desirable results.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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RCWoodworks

13 posts in 158 days


#3 posted 07-15-2019 02:20 PM

I’ve got about 300ft to build

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SMP

1308 posts in 356 days


#4 posted 07-15-2019 02:25 PM



about how many linear feet do you have to do ?
how much material do you want to remove for the bevel ?
“quick” would be the table saw.
IMO, the circular saw and electric planer would be the most
labor intensive with the least desirable results.

.

.

- John Smith

Yep, I would just rip on table saw with blade beveled

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John Smith

1920 posts in 613 days


#5 posted 07-15-2019 04:15 PM

there are personal preferences on cutting angles and bevels
on a table saw. if you use the TS, set it up to where it is the
most safe for you, your helpers and the saw. (to avoid kickbacks).
I have only done this once in all my life for a fence but have seen
several varieties of the Rot Boards. (95% are not beveled at all in my area).
some are at 45* the majority is much less, just to shed water
and help prevent buildup of grass clippings and other yard debris.
anywhere from 10 to 30 degrees. just get the flat surface off to direct
the water to the outside and not between the board and fence.
totally your call on that.
if you are really into doing it the Tom Silva way, cut a 1/8×1/4” drip edge
groove into the outside bottom of the board.
something like this – - – - –

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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RCWoodworks

13 posts in 158 days


#6 posted 07-15-2019 06:30 PM

Awesome info everyone thank you very much

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therealSteveN

3378 posts in 1025 days


#7 posted 07-15-2019 08:39 PM

Doing bevels on a TS truly is going to be safe and effective IF the stock is square, flat, and can stay flush to the fence.

That said, this isn’t the description of the wood I have seen that was to be used as fencing. If this is treated wood, even more so.

Using roller supports fore and aft a fellow could use a large chamfer bit on a router table, fingerboards could be placed on the table, and on the fence making a chute the wood would go through. This would keep the bevel consistent. You could control the cutting from a foot or more away at the closest, never get a kickback, and actually not feel like you are about to mess yourself every few feet when you hit a knot.

I have seen a bunch of fencing boards. I have not seen flat, true, square, ones though. Usually they are full of knots, many of which are loose, and just trying to saw it to length, you can have small explosions going through the knots. I wouldn’t want to be any part of running them through a TS to bevel them for length.

Another thought is see if there is a local with a woodmizer. Half those guys bought them to make their fortune milling wood. Probably most of them never got their first job. If you offered even a minimal amount someone would probably be thrilled to do it. 300 foot would probably be less than 2 hours including set up. That would by far, be the safest way to get it done.

You could probably start a thread saying looking for someone to run 300’ to put a bevel on fence stock. Add where you are etc etc etc.

-- Think safe, be safe

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John Smith

1920 posts in 613 days


#8 posted 07-15-2019 09:07 PM

You could probably start a thread saying looking for someone to run 300 to put a bevel on fence stock. Add where you are etc etc etc.
- therealSteveN

in addition to a thread in a forum; a listing on your local CraigsList may turn up some good leads.
and Rot Boards are normally pressure treated pine boards. (not cedar or cypress fence boards).
and the real purpose of a Rot Board is the sacrificial protection for the bottom of the fence panels
from weed eaters, lawnmowers, chewing varmints, etc. when the Rot Board wears out, you replace it.
it prolongs the life of the fence itself.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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therealSteveN

3378 posts in 1025 days


#9 posted 07-15-2019 09:16 PM

John is it not allowed here? Seems I see threads all the time asking for something local. I agree CL would be a marketplace type thing, I was just thinking here it could lead to a local meet. The more people who you have actually met in your area the better the entire area can be. IOW clubs form, meets happen, folks congregate to shoot the bull, etc etc. Going strictly from the market standpoint it seems more business like, not likely to go further.

If this place isn’t social, nothing is. People of the same pursuit, coming regularly to meet. In a sense anyhow.

Here in SW Ohio we had something like that going for a while. I/we need to jump start the idea. I’m pretty sure everyone enjoyed themselves. I sure did. They all started with a post on a woodworking forum.

Plus I do know what a rot board is. It was my post saying that wood used for them, and fencing would be dangerous on a TS rip.

-- Think safe, be safe

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John Smith

1920 posts in 613 days


#10 posted 07-15-2019 09:36 PM

agreed – I modified my response to “include” C/L.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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therealSteveN

3378 posts in 1025 days


#11 posted 07-16-2019 01:02 AM

Gotcha. I thought I had entered the twilight zone. :-)

-- Think safe, be safe

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SMP

1308 posts in 356 days


#12 posted 07-16-2019 02:17 AM



there are personal preferences on cutting angles and bevels
on a table saw. if you use the TS, set it up to where it is the
most safe for you, your helpers and the saw. (to avoid kickbacks).
I have only done this once in all my life for a fence but have seen
several varieties of the Rot Boards. (95% are not beveled at all in my area).
some are at 45* the majority is much less, just to shed water
and help prevent buildup of grass clippings and other yard debris.
anywhere from 10 to 30 degrees. just get the flat surface off to direct
the water to the outside and not between the board and fence.
totally your call on that.
if you are really into doing it the Tom Silva way, cut a 1/8×1/4” drip edge
groove into the outside bottom of the board.
- John Smith

As you mention most aren’t beveled. I am guessing thr OP mostly wants the bevel for aesthetics? I have been in my house around 20 years. No bevels, and find the boards usually rot on the bottom, especially Where they contact the ground and/or the sprinklers hit them “too much”. The replacements are so cheap I wouldn’t do any bevel or drip slot for functional purposes, only if I liked the aesthetics

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