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Forum topic by Karda posted 07-13-2019 01:10 AM 451 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1615 posts in 1009 days


07-13-2019 01:10 AM

I can’t turn a bowl start to stop, just can’t be on my feet that long, so I bag it and may not get back till the next day, some times I forget the bag. When I finish this bowl will packing in shaving still be of benefit. It is green. Thanks


18 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3748 posts in 1842 days


#1 posted 07-13-2019 03:42 AM

If you don’t bag it in some shavings it will probably crack even more but it depends upon how badly it cracked while it was not bagged. It may be better to try to turn off any cracks that formed before you bag it in the shavings, especially if there is any pith left in the bowl. Remove the pith of you can.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Karda

1615 posts in 1009 days


#2 posted 07-13-2019 03:51 AM

no pith in this piece and no cracks yet. I haven’t a crack problem with maple. YET I hope to do the inside tomorrow and bag it.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

598 posts in 358 days


#3 posted 07-14-2019 12:26 AM

It is difficult to use fixed rules on various woods. Not all “green” woods are the same. Some may be freshly cut, but grew quite slowly. Others grew fast and contain lots of fluids. The commercial bowl factories I’ve visited have developed a timing for aging their lumber, and the blanks, and the roughed-out bowls.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Karda

1615 posts in 1009 days


#4 posted 07-14-2019 03:49 AM

yea I know there are no hard and fast rules with wood just wondering. When you can only turn for 15 to 30 min at a time maybe twice a day if I’m lucky bowls don’t get into the shavings as soon as they should

View lew's profile

lew

12823 posts in 4210 days


#5 posted 07-14-2019 02:32 PM

I’ve been experimenting with the water and soap method.

I submerge the rough turned bowl in a solution of water and dishwashing liquid (6 parts water : 1 part Dawn dishwashing liquid). Soak it at least overnight (i usually let it in there for a couple of days). Then finish turning or put it in the paper bag along with shavings. No cracks with locust, really want to get some fruit wood and see if it works on that, too.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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OSU55

2381 posts in 2444 days


#6 posted 07-14-2019 05:33 PM

I have had great success with this approach turning green wood: anytime Im not going to be cutting the blank for more than 5 minutes, I put a plastic trash bag over it or, if it needs to come off the lathe because I need to turn something else, I put it in a plastic trash bag. The need is to stop, not slow, water evaporation, so wwhatever method you come up with to do that. Sometimes that blank may spend a couple of weeks bagged, and it might get some mold, which gets cut off anyway.

After the rough turning it goes into a thick kraft paper bag or wrapped with same, with chips, for drying. The bagged item is weighed, recorded on the bag, checked after a month, then every so often till the weight doesnt change. After you do this a while you get a good feel for how long something will take based on the moisture loss over the 1st month.

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Karda

1615 posts in 1009 days


#7 posted 07-14-2019 05:41 PM

Thanks I don’t want to cause cracks the tree does quite well by itself. I haven’t had much cracking with maple but others crack more

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bigJohninvegas

648 posts in 1917 days


#8 posted 07-14-2019 11:49 PM

So when I cannot finish a green turning like a bowl, I will use a water spray bottle and soak the peace, wrap it in a cotton towel and soaked that too. Then wrap it in a plastic grocery bag and tape it up. Leaving it on the lathe, since I am coming back to it.
This has worked very well for me. I’ve never had one crack yet. I have, had a little mold grow from time to time. (Only when I did not get back to it for like a week), And it’s always just on the surface and fresh. A light shot of bleach water cleans it all right off and all is good. Never had any problems there. No wood damage fro. The bleach either.

-- John

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Karda

1615 posts in 1009 days


#9 posted 07-15-2019 03:30 AM

Thanks John that sounds like a plan, I never thought of a towel. that will work

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

648 posts in 1917 days


#10 posted 07-15-2019 01:50 PM



Thanks John that sounds like a plan, I never thought of a towel. that will work

- Karda

Hi Karda,
I have used dish towel type rags, and double or triple grocery bag, or saran wrap and a bag too. I am in the desert, and a single layer of plastic will not trap enough moisture.
Be careful to protect your chuck and lathe when using the spray bottle too. Rust proof what you can.
Good luck.

-- John

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Karda

1615 posts in 1009 days


#11 posted 07-15-2019 05:10 PM

thanks John I will look for a tougher plastic bag and I think I have a flannel bag that will work for a wet bag.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1379 posts in 2490 days


#12 posted 07-16-2019 01:07 PM

When newspapers used to be bigger and more widely available, I’d use those to wrap up my green turnings and let them sit for at least 6 months. I still had some crack, but mostly they would turn out ok. Now I just use whatever is available whether a paper bag from the grocery store or the small freebie papers that get thrown on the driveway occasionally.

One thing I noticed is that if you leave sharp edges, cracks happen more easily because that tiny point dries quick, and the resulting tension creates a split, which allows more drying which makes it split more…. and so on. So round off your edges, and wrap in paper.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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RobHannon

301 posts in 985 days


#13 posted 07-16-2019 01:12 PM

I have not needed to do this myself yet, I do more spindle turning than bowl, but when I took a class the teacher recommended saran wrap for green bowls when we got the outside turned but didn’t have time to flip it and start hollowing.

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Karda

1615 posts in 1009 days


#14 posted 07-16-2019 05:56 PM

thanks for the suggestion, I am doing some, I have done the saran, and baging with shavings. I started rounding my lips because Jimmy Clews said it is a draw. People are attracted to a rounded edge over a flat one. My biggest problem is keeping them in the shavings long enough. If I run out of things to turn guess where I go. Another thing I am going to try is turning to finish then wrap in saran for about 10 – 14 day then let air dry. A utber reed gray does that and is quite successful at it .He says he gets warping but seldom cracks. He did a video on that subject

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Underdog

1379 posts in 2490 days


#15 posted 07-16-2019 07:47 PM

Soaking green turnings in Denatured Alcohol is said to enable speedy drying without cracks. I’ve not tried it myself because I haven’t wanted to spend the money on that much alcohol…

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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