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Attatching shelf to round table legs

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Forum topic by Jaxsun posted 07-11-2019 07:30 AM 202 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jaxsun

11 posts in 1087 days


07-11-2019 07:30 AM

Good morning, evening,or afternoon…I’m looking for some advice or suggestions as to how I can attatch a lower shelf(6” off the floor) to round table legs. I’m building a console/entry table for someone and they want the legs to look like they are going through the shelf, of course with no gaps. I’ve built my fair share of tables/furniture but I’ve yet to build to this detail. My first guess is that it would need to be a 2 piece leg? Any suggestions would be appreciated…Thanks, Jeff

-- JACK'S SON


8 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

1416 posts in 3267 days


#1 posted 07-11-2019 12:06 PM

Jig or fixture the leg so that you can cut off the bottom 6” at whatever splay angle the legs are at. Build shelf, locate legs drill shelf to fit dowel pin, drill legs for same dowel glue & clamp

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Robert

3436 posts in 1898 days


#2 posted 07-11-2019 01:30 PM

He nailed it. Any minor discrepancy in dowel holes won’t be noticed.

I would add a small glue block on the inside where it won’t be seen.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Kelly

2335 posts in 3362 days


#3 posted 07-12-2019 06:12 AM

Like above, I’d think of it as being like the bun feet on a chest.

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Jaxsun

11 posts in 1087 days


#4 posted 07-12-2019 06:26 AM

Thanks guys..the suggestions make perfect sense

-- JACK'S SON

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John Smith

1876 posts in 580 days


#5 posted 07-12-2019 03:28 PM

Jacxsun ~ if you are going to use the straight spindle type of legs,
this is a design that is used on a coffee table that I have in storage.
with the threaded lag screw in the upper part and the threaded insert
in the lower part, makes it easy to disassemble for storage.
[if the legs are going to be tapered, that would be a whole new method all together].


.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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Jaxsun

11 posts in 1087 days


#6 posted 07-12-2019 07:38 PM

Thanks John Smith…I was thinking about looking for some hardware that might help…now I have a visual of it…thankyou

-- JACK'S SON

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Ocelot

2263 posts in 3056 days


#7 posted 07-12-2019 08:06 PM

Helpful thread!

I bought 4 bowling pins a couple years ago to make something but after fiddling around trying to think how to do it, lost interest.

I could use the same technique – at any point on the bowling pins.

I still can’t imagine why I thought I would want a table made with old bowling pins…but now I know how.

-Paul

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John Smith

1876 posts in 580 days


#8 posted 07-12-2019 08:44 PM

YVW
it is pretty simple when you can see it. I myself am a very visual person.
I have had the coffee table I mentioned above since 1974 when I was in
the military. it has been assembled and disassembled dozens of times and
shipped all over the world. it is still tight as new. once the hardware is installed,
it is a matter of just tightening it all up by hand. (don’t force it).
the hardware is commonly found in the Box Stores.
[and I guess it really doesn’t matter which way the hardware goes in.
whatever works best for you].

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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