LumberJocks

Best way to Clean up / Resurface a Cast Iron Router Table Top?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by wilschroter posted 07-06-2019 10:47 AM 642 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

89 posts in 979 days


07-06-2019 10:47 AM

I’ve got one of Rockler’s cast iron router tables that’s caught some moisture leading to rust.

https://www.rockler.com/bench-dog-promaxrt-cast-iron-router-table-top

I’m sure this happens with plenty of you guys, but what are you using to the clear the rust off and get a brand new surface? I tried to use “Iron Out” which has worked well for me on other applications around the house but it just made a bit of a mess of the top turning it different shades of blue-ish tones.


12 replies so far

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1704 posts in 1862 days


#1 posted 07-06-2019 10:51 AM

I use an orbital sander with 220-320 grip paper carefully. Then wax it. Works great.
Do not go at it with a grinder of any type. We like pictures!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5647 posts in 2948 days


#2 posted 07-06-2019 10:53 AM

Scrape off what you can with a razor scraper (really!), then turn to an ROS like Grant said. You can really get cast iron looking good doing that. Also, like Grant said…skip the grinder.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

89 posts in 979 days


#3 posted 07-06-2019 10:54 AM

Hah I wouldn’t have guessed the ROS would be the first pass. It’s one of those things where you say “You know, this could go very wrong…” but it sounds like an easy fix. I will try to snap before/afters.

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1704 posts in 1862 days


#4 posted 07-06-2019 10:58 AM

Just keep it flat, don’t try to dig into any spots and if it’s really bad I might use 120-150 grit to start but I’d take it to 220-320 regardless of where you have to start.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

656 posts in 1203 days


#5 posted 07-06-2019 01:26 PM

I used a ROS to get the rust off the top of a shaper my brother gave me. It was very rusty, and I had to use some 150 grit to start with, then went to 220. Then the wax.

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

89 posts in 979 days


#6 posted 07-06-2019 01:50 PM

Worked like a charm! Had to use 150 but such a huge difference. Took about 20 mins.

BEFORE

AFTER

View wilschroter's profile

wilschroter

89 posts in 979 days


#7 posted 07-06-2019 02:04 PM

Also, what was the wax you were suggesting? I’m using Johnson wax on my planer.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000DIWIM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

View Delete's profile

Delete

439 posts in 826 days


#8 posted 07-06-2019 02:28 PM

I use lots of WD-40 and 250 wet/dry emery cloth mounted in a sanding block with a little bit of sweat investment. A power tool like an ROS is quicker, but you have to be careful not to remove to much around the edges, to preserve a true flat surface.

View moke's profile

moke

1402 posts in 3231 days


#9 posted 07-06-2019 02:42 PM

+1 with Carlos….Cast Iron is softer than you think. An ROS is fine if you keep moving and don’t work one spot too much. You can take it away from being dead flat pretty easily.

-- Mike

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5647 posts in 2948 days


#10 posted 07-06-2019 03:44 PM

Looks good, you’re ready to go!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

656 posts in 1203 days


#11 posted 07-07-2019 12:09 AM

It was Johnson’s wax that I used on the shaper. I use it on all the flat metal surfaces in the shop. Most everything is in the air conditioned shop, but the shaper is on the ‘barn side’ – indoors but not in a protected environment. The wax holds up very well. Of course any good wax should be just fine, as long as it based on beeswax. I would not use car wax.

I had a great friend, now deceased, that would come over and visit most days. He’d drink one beer, and between sips he’d rest the beer on my jointer outfeed table. As soon as he was gone I’d wipe off the moisture and rewax that spot. No rust.

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

329 posts in 2189 days


#12 posted 07-08-2019 12:57 PM

I use a scotch brite pad with my ROS and WD-40 for rust and wax removal. Then Johnson’s paste wax after that.

Made a video on how to do it.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com