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Forum topic by nickbatz posted 07-04-2019 07:48 PM 1039 views 0 times favorited 50 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nickbatz

247 posts in 501 days


07-04-2019 07:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

On vacation, I saw these benches at the Barnes Museum in Philly over the weekend.

How did they do that?

CNC machine?

(I’m only curious – not likely to want to duplicate it.)


50 replies so far

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nickbatz

247 posts in 501 days


#1 posted 07-04-2019 07:50 PM

Ag. For some reason, some pictures post here rotated. Well, it’s a “y” indentation at the edge of the bench.

I exaggerated the contrast and color here. Let’s see whether it’s easier to see.

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LeeRoyMan

169 posts in 148 days


#2 posted 07-04-2019 07:54 PM

More than likely a cnc, but it could also be easily done with some set up jigs and a router sled followed by some flat sanding.

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nickbatz

247 posts in 501 days


#3 posted 07-04-2019 07:59 PM

I’d never heard of a router sled. Thanks!

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Nubsnstubs

1581 posts in 2151 days


#4 posted 07-04-2019 09:22 PM

I’m curious now. Is the seat peaked in the middle?

I’ve made smaller pieces before by standing the piece on end on my saw, angled the blade, and made my cut. ........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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nickbatz

247 posts in 501 days


#5 posted 07-04-2019 09:54 PM

The seat is indented, Nubsnstubs, but it’s not smooth, it’s… well, the third picture (the one four posts up) shows it pretty clearly – it’s angled in.

I don’t see how you could make these cuts on a table saw, but LeeRoyMan’s idea would work. “Easily” might be a stretch for me, but I can see how a router sled could work.

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CaptainKlutz

1502 posts in 1915 days


#6 posted 07-04-2019 11:01 PM

CNC would be simplest process,
but:
Another method to making a v-shaped ‘trough’ from a plank is: by using compound angles on end piece saw cuts.

Would need to make a special angle sled for the compound angle on table/band saw, but it’s not that hard.

The center of ‘v’ appears to be on glue line between boards, and if true; this simplifies the process.
It would allow end piece to be make in 2 pieces and need only one compound angle cut per end piece.

After angles are cut, add some hidden dowels, biscuits or domino tenons; and it’s rock solid trough.

Cheers!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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Kelly

2335 posts in 3365 days


#7 posted 07-05-2019 01:42 AM

So many ways to Rome.

Ideas mentioned above would, obviously, get us there. However, I don’t have a CNC toy, and am not inclined to pay someone with one to get me there/

For me, this would be done with an electric hand plane, to rough it in, a belt sander to get a bit closer. Now that I have it, details would be complements of my FlatMaster sander.

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nickbatz

247 posts in 501 days


#8 posted 07-05-2019 06:02 PM


Another method to making a v-shaped trough from a plank is: by using compound angles on end piece saw cuts.

Would need to make a special angle sled for the compound angle on table/band saw, but it s not that hard.

The center of v appears to be on glue line between boards, and if true; this simplifies the process.
It would allow end piece to be make in 2 pieces and need only one compound angle cut per end piece.

After angles are cut, add some hidden dowels, biscuits or domino tenons; and it s rock solid trough.

I don’t think it’s on the glue line, and I’m pretty sure I would have noticed that when I was looking at it and scratching my head.

My hunch is that LeeRoyMan got it right – probably CNC (especially likely because there are several of the same bench in the museum), but a router sled would be the easiest way to do it without that.

And I’ve learned something – again, I hadn’t heard of a router sled.

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Phil32

580 posts in 324 days


#9 posted 07-05-2019 07:14 PM

Note that the grain of the boards extends across the triangular piece(s). They are not mitered. The bench was glued up using stock of one thickness, then the triangles were cut out and the bench split lengthwise. These pieces were then cut to produce the “trough”. The edges were smoothed for final gluing, perhaps with dowels or biscuits.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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nickbatz

247 posts in 501 days


#10 posted 07-06-2019 05:36 PM



Note that the grain of the boards extends across the triangular piece(s). They are not mitered. The bench was glued up using stock of one thickness, then the triangles were cut out and the bench split lengthwise. These pieces were then cut to produce the “trough”. The edges were smoothed for final gluing, perhaps with dowels or biscuits.

- Phil32

No, it wasn’t done with a saw. And yes, it’s all one set of boards.

I’m not quite sure about your order of operations, though. It looks to me like they started with a flat glued panel and cut out the entire shape, because I’m all but positive that the “crease” isn’t along a glue line.

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LeeRoyMan

169 posts in 148 days


#11 posted 07-06-2019 06:04 PM

Did something similar once before.
The arched doors were tricky.

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nickbatz

247 posts in 501 days


#12 posted 07-06-2019 06:38 PM



Did something similar once before.
The arched doors were tricky.

- LeeRoyMan

Cool! Toplogically, that’s the exact reverse of the benches.

I assume the doors are solid? If so it must have bothered you covering up your handiwork with paint!

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LeeRoyMan

169 posts in 148 days


#13 posted 07-06-2019 06:43 PM

Yes solid doors, No, I don’t mind painting, whatever they pay for is ok with me.

Are you saying the peak of the Y’ on your benches are sunk, not raised? I thought they were raised. If so I may have to rethunk how to do it.

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nickbatz

247 posts in 501 days


#14 posted 07-06-2019 08:36 PM



Yes solid doors, No, I don t mind painting, whatever they pay for is ok with me.

Are you saying the peak of the Y on your benches are sunk, not raised? I thought they were raised. If so I may have to rethunk how to do it.

- LeeRoyMan

The benches are sunk because people’s butts protrude! It would be very uncomfortable if they were raised – although I’m sure there are people who like that kind of thing.

But I think your first idea is right – you could construct a sloping jig to scoop out the bench seat, the reverse of your doors.

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MrRon

5572 posts in 3664 days


#15 posted 07-06-2019 08:38 PM

Looks to me like they edge joined 5 boards in a length that was twice the length of the bench; then crosscut in half, rotated the top piece 180° and a dutchman added at the joint and cut in half again through the dutchman. Were the two ends of the bench the same? or was the triangular piece only at one end?

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