LumberJocks

Add oil to maple butcher studio desk

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Rokach posted 07-01-2019 09:39 AM 208 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Rokach's profile

Rokach

10 posts in 629 days


07-01-2019 09:39 AM

Topic tags/keywords: wood maple butcher

Hi,
I have this desk (maple butcher) about 1 year and I don’t know if I need to add oil (I never add a oil to the desk)
Also why the butcher wood need oil?

Thanks!

Images:
https://imgur.com/gallery/oFLac8Q


7 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

565 posts in 1075 days


#1 posted 07-01-2019 01:55 PM

B Block usually needs oil because the previous oil has been washed out during use. I kind of doubt that any actual oil was used on your block or that you’ve washed it out. It actually looks like a film finish to me. Leave it alone until it shows wear, then think about re-finishing.

-- Sawdust Maker

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3402 posts in 1030 days


#2 posted 07-01-2019 04:02 PM

Just like a persons hands, or feet, if they become dry, they crack, split, and become painful. That butcher block will also look, dry, it may show cracks, and I’m not sure if a BB can feel pain, but it’s rough surface may cause you some.

For wood, oil is like lotion for a persons skin. As a matter of fact some people put oils on their skin to keep them from drying. Baby oil probably being the #1.

Just know if you liberally oil that wood, it will take a little while for the oil to absorb fully into the wood, and depending on if it has a “topcoat” finish. Something hard, so you can put a sweaty can of pop on it, and not leave water rings. Well you may have to deal with whatever it is finished with, before you ever get close to the wood. Sometimes wax is a better way to get a wooden finish looking better.

Whatever you decide to use, you ALWAYS want to test first, on that inconspicuous area. Failure to do this, could leave your entire top looking really weird.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Rokach's profile

Rokach

10 posts in 629 days


#3 posted 07-01-2019 04:50 PM



B Block usually needs oil because the previous oil has been washed out during use. I kind of doubt that any actual oil was used on your block or that you ve washed it out. It actually looks like a film finish to me. Leave it alone until it shows wear, then think about re-finishing.

- LittleShaver


I never add oil to this desk it’s dry, you think I need to add oil?

View LesB's profile

LesB

2154 posts in 3899 days


#4 posted 07-01-2019 04:52 PM

Butcher block used as a desk should never need “oil” and if it the block was originally designed as a desk and not a kitchen counter top it probably has a top coat that makes it semi impervious to adding oil. So like SteveN above I would suggest you just use a furniture polish or wax.

Should you use oil be aware that some oils like mineral oil (often used on kitchen butcher block and cutting boards) never dry or cure and it is possible that any absorbent material laid on top could pick up some of the oil and be stained by it. Oils that dry or cure (some rather slowly) include boiled linseed oil BLO, Tung oil, and processed walnut oil. Even those will not dry/cure well if applied to a hard finish coat which does not allow them to soak in to the wood.

-- Les B, Oregon

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

565 posts in 1075 days


#5 posted 07-01-2019 05:30 PM

After looking at all your pictures, that is definitely NOT butcher block. It’s glued up strip wood with a clear coat finish. Oil would cause a giant mess. It really doesn’t look like it needs anything beyond a coat of wax.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Rokach's profile

Rokach

10 posts in 629 days


#6 posted 07-01-2019 05:47 PM


After looking at all your pictures, that is definitely NOT butcher block. It s glued up strip wood with a clear coat finish. Oil would cause a giant mess. It really doesn t look like it needs anything beyond a coat of wax.

- LittleShaver

What is the difference between “It’s glued up strip wood with a clear coat finish” and butcher block? Which is better/expensive?
The carpenter told me that’s a maple butcher with a lot wax.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

826 posts in 3249 days


#7 posted 07-01-2019 06:16 PM

Not certain, but I believe true butcher block would be end grain surface, ( vertical ) grain. This is so the knives or cleavers actually split between the end grain a bit, instead of cutting across grain and leaving splinters. An original butcher block was probably a tree stump or a piece of log. You have horizontal grain.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com