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Unisaw with new motor jamming up

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Forum topic by tedp1 posted 06-30-2019 09:15 PM 563 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tedp1

3 posts in 513 days


06-30-2019 09:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: unisaw motor jamming tablesaw

I’ve been fixing up an old delta unisaw, and bought a brand new 2 HP Leeson motor for it.

Everything seems to be working, but when I flip the thing on, it takes a good 8 or so seconds to come up to speed (which in and of itself is fine, but seems slow?) and then when I try to cut wood, it jams up after about 4 inches on rips. Cutting any amount of wood really slows down the motor, and after a few inches it seizes up.

A video of this happening is here: https://photos.app.goo.gl/Lhcm3UPtStgp6jkQA

Things I’ve considered:
- Maybe the fence isn’t aligned with the blade? Well, it looks pretty aligned. And I tried cutting on either side of the fence and the behavior is the same on either side.
- Maybe the belt tension is too high? Or too low? I tried increasing the tension and same story. I tried loosening it, same story.
- Maybe the bearings are bad? Well when I unplug the thing and turn the blade with my hand, it seems to move pretty easily. I included a video of that as well.
- Maybe the blade is dull? It’s a brand new blade.
- Maybe I’m pushing the wood through too fast? Even when I push it through as slow as I possibly can, it still binds up.
- Maybe there’s a problem with my power service? Could be, although my drill press and chop saw work fine.
- Maybe there’s a problem with the motor itself? Could be — any ideas on that?
- Maybe the motor isn’t wired properly? It came wired from the factory — is it possible I need to change it up somehow?

Any ideas what I should try next? I’d really like to get this thing working. I’m just trying to cut some plywood — a 2 HP motor should have no problem with that, right?


10 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3827 posts in 2407 days


#1 posted 06-30-2019 09:48 PM

Welcome Ted.

Lack of power and long start up? Ruled out bearing drag?

Suggest two things to check:
1) Power line voltage droop or incorrect voltage applied
2) Run capacitor bad or failing

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2394 posts in 2616 days


#2 posted 06-30-2019 09:49 PM

Move the fence away from the blade, and try it with the thin piece being cut off on the left side of the blade. You are asking for a very nasty kickback the way you are doing it in the video. It could be the way you are pushing the board is forcing the wood to pinch the blade. Use some push sticks also and any other safety device you can come up with. May not be the problem but your video is scary.

Is your motor wired correctly for the power you are hooking it up to?

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View Delete's profile

Delete

439 posts in 1285 days


#3 posted 06-30-2019 10:13 PM

Problem sounds electrical to me. Here’s a long shot, you say it came wired from Leeson but I assume you still had to wire it to your start switch. At 2 HP Leeson probably wired it 230V, is there a chance you wired the switch 115 V, that would certainly put a crutch on that motor.

View ruger's profile

ruger

142 posts in 1008 days


#4 posted 06-30-2019 10:36 PM

what paul said,,NEVER cut with the fence like that. google table saw kick back. please.

View tedp1's profile

tedp1

3 posts in 513 days


#5 posted 06-30-2019 11:11 PM

Roger and Paul — point taken on the safety of that type of cut. I’m pretty sure that’s not the problem with the tablesaw, but I will use push sticks going forward.

Carlson — thanks for your suggestion. 230v wiring on a 115v circuit sounds like me best theory right now. I’ll look into that.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1322 posts in 2474 days


#6 posted 06-30-2019 11:41 PM

In video you can see obvious binding from improper feeding of material using fence which doesn’t help. What pully ratio are you using? I see motor is 3450rpm.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8278 posts in 3112 days


#7 posted 07-01-2019 12:09 AM

Classic symptoms of trying to run a motor wired for 240v on 120v.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View tedp1's profile

tedp1

3 posts in 513 days


#8 posted 07-01-2019 12:30 AM

Just wanted to write in and confirm that this was indeed a motor wired for 220 / high voltage. I rewired it for 110, tried it again, and it works perfectly. Thanks for the help everyone!

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2394 posts in 2616 days


#9 posted 07-01-2019 01:47 AM

Good to read. I never knew what the effect/affect (I can never figure which is the correct one to use) of that would be. I would assume if it was reversed 110 plugged into 220, smoke would be involved.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View toolie's profile

toolie

2193 posts in 3541 days


#10 posted 07-01-2019 06:18 PM



Good to read. I never knew what the effect/affect (I can never figure which is the correct one to use) of that would be. I would assume if it was reversed 110 plugged into 220, smoke would be involved.

- PaulDoug

Were it wired for 110V and energized with 220V, release of the motor’s magic blue smoke is probably a foregone conclusion. The OPs motor was wired for 220V and energized with 110V.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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