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Walnut Workbench Finish

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Forum topic by sk416 posted 06-30-2019 11:26 AM 773 views 2 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sk416

22 posts in 2225 days


06-30-2019 11:26 AM

Hi all, looking for recommendations for finishing a walnut workbench. I’m building it in my basement, so a low to zero VOC finish is preferred. I’m looking to achieve a deep oiled finish which isn’t too shiny and where the pores remain exposed. Something like this, which is really tactile and will take on a great patina over time. Thoughts on how i can get there?

-- www.wakenedhands.com


6 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

6000 posts in 3465 days


#1 posted 06-30-2019 01:00 PM

Use Tried & True Danish oil.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4533 posts in 2608 days


#2 posted 06-30-2019 06:29 PM

+1 Tried and True Finishes

For hand tool work bench I used 50/50 blend of Tried and True Original Wood Finish & Tried and True Danish Oil. Not my concoction, read about it somewhere around here, and it works really well.

Best part is glue doesn’t stick to bench top. I sand top and re-coat every 1-2 years with Original Wood Finish if I notice the glue is getting harder to knock off. :-)

I used the T&T Original Wood Finish on some walnut in recent pizza peel in my projects list if you want to see what couple coats looks like?

FWIW – T&T Danish Oil is simple Linseed Oil finish with non metallic (food safe) drying agent. The Original Wood Finish is blend of same oil with bees wax. I use them often when I want a surface that begs to be touched. :-)

The Danish oil can be buffed to a satin finish after 3-4 coats. Add some carnauba wax on top when cured and it will buff to a slick semi-gloss sheen. I find the straight danish oil is too slippery for work bench, as stuff slides off easily (even without waxing it). The addition of beeswax in Original Wood Finish reduces the slickness, but still has nice touchable satin sheen.

They are both very low odor with no solvents. I actually like the aroma of T&T oil finishes.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View sk416's profile

sk416

22 posts in 2225 days


#3 posted 06-30-2019 07:26 PM



+1 Tried and True Finishes

For hand tool work bench I used 50/50 blend of Tried and True Original Wood Finish & Tried and True Danish Oil. Not my concoction, read about it somewhere around here, and it works really well.

Best part is glue doesn t stick to bench top. I sand top and re-coat every 1-2 years with Original Wood Finish if I notice the glue is getting harder to knock off. :-)

I used the T&T Original Wood Finish on some walnut in recent pizza peel in my projects list if you want to see what couple coats looks like?

FWIW – T&T Danish Oil is simple Linseed Oil finish with non metallic (food safe) drying agent. The Original Wood Finish is blend of same oil with bees wax. I use them often when I want a surface that begs to be touched. :-)

The Danish oil can be buffed to a satin finish after 3-4 coats. Add some carnauba wax on top when cured and it will buff to a slick semi-gloss sheen. I find the straight danish oil is too slippery for work bench, as stuff slides off easily (even without waxing it). The addition of beeswax in Original Wood Finish reduces the slickness, but still has nice touchable satin sheen.

They are both very low odor with no solvents. I actually like the aroma of T&T oil finishes.

Cheers!

- CaptainKlutz

Thanks for the thorough reply Captain. Have you tried their varnish blend? If so, do you have any thoughts on how well it compares to the others?

-- www.wakenedhands.com

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CaptainKlutz

4533 posts in 2608 days


#4 posted 06-30-2019 09:37 PM


Thanks for the thorough reply Captain. Have you tried their varnish blend? If so, do you have any thoughts on how well it compares to the others?
- sk416

Sorry, no?
When I want a hard durable varnish to stand up to my kids, I use either spray lacquer or polyurethane?

Not an average person when it comes to finishes? Have a wee bit of material scientist experience. :-)
TBH – don’t prefer the rosin T&T chose to use as varnish? It’s not a bad choice, but it’s basically refined pine tar, or ~19th century varnish.
OK, maybe I am little biased? I’ve used rosin as tackifiers in adhesive/coating formulations. When ‘cured’ they are little soft for me to call them ‘hard varnish’. Especially with high temperatures seen in my Arizona garage shop. Another problem is rosin will absorb mineral spirits or turpentine, and take forever dry & harden. Will also soften with exposure to same solvents after curing.
Having never used T&T Varnish, don’t know if it will act as I expect from chemistry of SDS and my experiences with rosin in coatings? I did read FWW article where they didn’t like T&T Varnish, BECAUSE they choose to thin it with mineral solvents and it took month to cure?

Frankly, if I ever needed/wanted a low odor oil-varnish for fine furniture without kids, I still might try it? T&T products I have used above have been very good.

PS – be sure to follow Mfg application recommendations, I.E. use very thin layers rubbed/polished into wood.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View sk416's profile

sk416

22 posts in 2225 days


#5 posted 06-30-2019 11:44 PM

Okay, I like the idea of going with your 50-50 T&T mix. I’ll post a few pics when I’m ready to finish. Appreciate your guidance.

-- www.wakenedhands.com

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7111 posts in 2501 days


#6 posted 07-01-2019 03:07 AM

I personally prefer the T&T Varnish Oil over their Danish Oil. It just seems like it provides a little more resistance to moisture without adding a plastic layer like a poly finish does but that is just a subjective thing. It is my go-to finish, especially for tool handles or anything you are going to handle a lot. I’ve used it on trivets and never had a problem with heat or moisture affecting it so it is a tough finish. You just have to take your time and apply multiple, very thin coats and buff it with 0000 steel wool or white abrasive pad before each coat and it winds up silky smooth. I have not tried their original finish but I am sure it is good too.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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