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Cutting 45 Degree Angle Cuts on the Table Saw

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Forum topic by burlygirl posted 06-27-2019 02:58 AM 1065 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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burlygirl

4 posts in 194 days


06-27-2019 02:58 AM

My reach is for help in cutting a 45 degree angle on the table saw. I am cutting a 42 inch board at a 45 degree angle to make a french cleat. The saw has been making very nice clean cut at 90. But iit is binding and bogs own when I do the 45 cut. I am cutting a 1/2 inch piece of blond wood. I also tried piece of 1/2 piece of pine. I tried raising the blade a bit, but that did not help. I can make the cuts with a 3/4 inch board without the issue. I wanted to use the leaner boards for a lean and clean project in my kitchen. Can anyone speak to this?


17 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2216 days


#1 posted 06-27-2019 03:21 AM

When a tablesaw binds in a rip cut at 45 and you wood is flat and straight it means your saw Is not properly adjusted.
If you have a cabinet saw there’s hope.

Good Luck

-- Aj

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5585 posts in 2912 days


#2 posted 06-27-2019 10:48 AM

It might be that your stock is slightly bowed, if that’s true it will raise up against the blade when you pass it through the saw. It need to be perfectly flat, or held down in some fashion (safely, obviously) to get it registered to the saw table.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1396 posts in 1234 days


#3 posted 06-27-2019 01:13 PM

If you have a contractor saw, there is also hope but it is more difficult to adjust. Grizzly Tool Company has a video that tells how to shim the corners to get a 45 degree cut that doesn’t bind. Just set aside several hours to mess with it until you get it right. I know this from experience.


If you have a cabinet saw there’s hope.
- Aj2

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

306 posts in 1892 days


#4 posted 06-27-2019 01:27 PM

It seems to me that, since you can make the cut with thicker material, the problem is not with the saw. The problem is with the thinner material. It is either not flat, or it is rising up when you cut it. If it is rising up, use a better push stick – one that will hold it down. If the board itself is not flat, joint it or get one that is.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23173 posts in 3102 days


#5 posted 06-27-2019 01:38 PM

Could be the kerf is closing up right after the cut?

Hmmm..clamp a thin piece to the fence, to where the piece being cut just slides under it. This will be a hold down. Might see IF the splitter goes out of alignment when you tilt the saw…

Does the saw merely bog down, or is there burning in the kerf…...?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

732 posts in 1521 days


#6 posted 06-27-2019 10:17 PM

I’ll add to what has been said above. First with the blade vertical, make sure your fence is parallel to the blade. Second, if your saw blade tilts to the left, make sure your fence is on the right, and vice versa. Doing it the opposite way tends to trap the work piece between the blade, table surface, and fence. Third, before you tilt your blade, rip your material down to a minimum width just wide enough to cut the cleat the width you want plus the 45 deg. plus a little extra. When you make the 45 deg. cut, this will minimize the width of the cut-off and reduce the tendency to bind. Another thing you can do is support your work piece on a strip of 1/8” or 1/4” plywood just wide enough to go between the fence and blade. This will elevate the cut-off above the table surface and let it drop away from the blade as it is cut reducing the chance of binding.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#7 posted 06-28-2019 01:15 PM

how much weight will your cleats be supporting?
I would say that anything over 20 pounds would need
two or more, depending on the overall size and total weight.

A cleat method that I often use is the square lip design.
it is just an alternative selection to the 45 degree grip.
several “Pro and Con” opinions on both designs.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View LesB's profile

LesB

2126 posts in 3861 days


#8 posted 06-28-2019 06:40 PM

Adding to Bilyo’s comments. It is critical to eliminate binding with the blade and besides having the fence in the proper place, using hold downs to keep the wood firmly against the table top is very helpful in getting a true miter cut…..at any angle.

All that being said there are metal brackets available that do the same thing using even less space that a home made wood cleat and they are not expensive.

-- Les B, Oregon

View burlygirl's profile

burlygirl

4 posts in 194 days


#9 posted 06-28-2019 10:38 PM

An apology for not getting my response back out sooner. I just have not seized a moment to put fresh eyes on my dilemma and consider all the wonderful help offered. I just took at look at my blade and see that it is not squared up and thus feeding in at an angle causing it to bog down as it gets several inches into the board. Something I should not assumed was correct and should have checked. I have successfully cut larger cleats previously. I was given this Craftsman table saw a couple of years ago. It is probably 10 + years old. I am not putting much weight on the cleats and considering the use of thicker material. Again, thanks so much for all the feedback and suggestions. It goes further then you will ever know. I am glad I discovered this wonderful place on the internet and hope one day I can offer something back. Thank you.

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

305 posts in 3685 days


#10 posted 06-30-2019 08:32 AM



how much weight will your cleats be supporting?
I would say that anything over 20 pounds would need
two or more, depending on the overall size and total weight.

A cleat method that I often use is the square lip design.
it is just an alternative selection to the 45 degree grip.
several “Pro and Con” opinions on both designs.

.

- John Smith


I think you are being a bit over careful there. I have a simple bookshelf, about 4 × 4 feet, hanging on French cleats in our storage room. There is tons of French wine and other heavy stuff in there, easily 40-60 pounds. Holds up totally fine. Just my two cents, no offense :)

View burlygirl's profile

burlygirl

4 posts in 194 days


#11 posted 07-01-2019 10:19 AM

I really like the square lip suggestion. I think I may give this try. I will post my project when complete. May be a couple of weeks

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4041 posts in 2407 days


#12 posted 07-01-2019 11:03 AM

While either the 45 or square design work fine, I prefer the 45 because there are no sharp corners to crack.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

732 posts in 1521 days


#13 posted 07-01-2019 02:29 PM

Also, keep in mind that it is rare for walls to be perfectly flat. Over several feet of distance, it is possible for the wall to curve enough that your french cleat may not perfectly engage. In that case, it is usually better use two short cleats, one at each corner of the cabinet.
I prefer using the angled cleats as they will “pull” the cabinet tight to the wall as they engage. Also, they can accommodate a slight amount of wall curvature that the square ones can’t unless they are cut with some looseness.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3115 posts in 2591 days


#14 posted 07-01-2019 02:43 PM

Redoak and bilyo +1 The rabbet will work but the angle doesn’t have to be exact. It will pull in tight and the wall, doesn’t need a perfectly flat wall, and will be stronger because it has more wood holding and doesn’t have the sharp corners that can crack.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View burlygirl's profile

burlygirl

4 posts in 194 days


#15 posted 07-01-2019 09:40 PM

So many great tips and suggestions from experienced to a beginner. Helps so much in thinking it through. The space is between 2 cabinets over a sink with a small over head light in the bulkhead. About 40 inches across. I just want a place where I can have some options without blocking the light. Perhaps a knife rack, a few spices, coffee cup rack, towel bar, or perhaps a note board or art that makes me smile.

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