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Forum topic by RobHannon posted 06-26-2019 03:56 PM 354 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RobHannon

276 posts in 949 days


06-26-2019 03:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: clothes dream shop washer laundry

So I have been planning out my post retirement dream shop for a while now and I am at the phase where certain details are making enough sense to become a plan rather than just a dream. I have been gathering lots of drawings, materials costs, permit requirements, etc. and sharing them with my wife while I plan this out along with a list of things that I think an ideal shop would have. The other day, half jokingly, my wife said I should have room for a washer and dryer in the shop so I stop bringing dusty clothes into the house to deal with. I had not thought of this at all as problem to address. Any of you folks who have setup a dedicated hobby/work space done anything to deal with keeping shop clothing clean or out of the home?


16 replies so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

5552 posts in 1403 days


#1 posted 06-26-2019 04:04 PM

ive never worried about it nor has my wife,i just use the air hose and blow off before going in.dont think id want a laundry attached as part of my shop.plus are you really going to run a load with just a few pieces of clothing?

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View CarlosInTheSticks's profile

CarlosInTheSticks

385 posts in 791 days


#2 posted 06-26-2019 04:20 PM

Laundry equipment sounds like way overkill for a one man hobby shop, I sometimes use an air hose but be aware an air hose for this purpose is dangerous and not recommended by health experts, it can be deadly if you have open cuts or get it to close to the skin or vulnerable areas like eyes or ears. A better solution is coveralls or shop coats, stored in a small cabinet or locker near your entrance/exit, they go on when you enter off when you exit.

-- "There are no utopias, chaos theory reigns, anyone who says different is selling you something"

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

528 posts in 597 days


#3 posted 06-26-2019 04:41 PM

Put a bathroom in it and change after your done. Shake out the dust before bringing it in the house.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2126 posts in 3862 days


#4 posted 06-26-2019 06:53 PM

As far as dust on my clothes goes I just blow it off with the air hose….not my skin, face, or ears… just the clothes. Coveralls is a good idea when the shop is cool.

My shop is detached from the house so I put a full bathroom in, it is very handy when I’m working in the shop and outside to avoid tracking into the house to use the toilet also with the thought that a future owner could turn it into an in-law quarters if it were necessary.

-- Les B, Oregon

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

680 posts in 3212 days


#5 posted 06-26-2019 08:05 PM

Definitely do not use compressed air to blow off dust. It can be very dangerous. Use a vacuum to clean off. Maybe you can find a used apartment size stack unit, small loads, small footprint.

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

244 posts in 1194 days


#6 posted 06-26-2019 08:11 PM

Problem solved.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1494 posts in 1913 days


#7 posted 06-26-2019 08:17 PM

When I had a dedicated shop, created a mud/laundry room space between the shop and house. Had place to hang dirty jackets or coveralls plus shelf for work shoes. Had throw rugs on floor to catch dust/dirt; and door on each end to keep dust/dirt inside. Still used compressor with one of those safety bow guns to knock dust off clothes before going inside, but having a transition space helps keep house cleaner. Shared space also avoided me owning the household laundry services. :-)

The other thing that keeps dust out of house is to avoid constantly running inside for something. Best to put bathroom, refrigerator, snack cabinet, small desk with PC; all in the shop. Then have no need to go inside till your done working or need sleep. I ended up having more of a ‘man cave’, that was also a work shop. :)

Cheers!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

276 posts in 949 days


#8 posted 06-26-2019 08:21 PM

Half bath for sure is on the list. I am more likely to add a shower and a locker than I would a stacked laundry unit, but nothing is completely off the table at this point. Fine dust I hope will be less of an issue due to better dust collection, but see me doing more turning as I get older. I have considered a flex hose, like the dust right from Rockler, setup by the door to vacuum myself off before coming inside.

Richard, I am sure my wife greatly approve of your solution if I was built like that.

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

797 posts in 2368 days


#9 posted 06-26-2019 08:39 PM

I get yelled at from time to time to wipe my feet! The laundry room is between my shop (garage) and the house. I keep a separate pair of shoes to change into from the shop. Def blow off the dust too.. I agree no laundery equipment in the shop, fine just will get into the motors etc.

-- Petey

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5452 posts in 2770 days


#10 posted 06-26-2019 09:24 PM

I would love to just have a sink in my shop, much less a laundry room. Adding plumbing to your shop is going to add considerable expense, and that is why I don’t have a sink in mine. If you can afford it though, why not?

-- Bondo Gaposis

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23176 posts in 3102 days


#11 posted 06-26-2019 09:40 PM

I HAVE to share my shop with the laundry Room in the basement of the house…No other way around it.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View pottz's profile

pottz

5552 posts in 1403 days


#12 posted 06-26-2019 11:22 PM



Problem solved.

- Richard Lee


hey nothing wrong with woodworking nude is there-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

276 posts in 949 days


#13 posted 06-27-2019 12:53 PM



I would love to just have a sink in my shop, much less a laundry room. Adding plumbing to your shop is going to add considerable expense, and that is why I don t have a sink in mine. If you can afford it though, why not?

- bondogaposis

After the fact, yes plumbing will be cost prohibitive. But I am going to need to trench for electric anyway so makes sense to get other utilities in the ground now while it is not a lot more cost. Septic hookup will be my biggest hurdle for plumbing.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#14 posted 06-27-2019 01:09 PM

My wife abhors dirt. So, I keep an outfit or two right outside the shop door and change before I go in to work and again before I go back into the living space. Once that outfit needs laundering, I shake it out, put it in a trash bag and take it to the laundry room. Everybody’s happy ;-) I will say that in the winter I can wear the same outfit for weeks because it’s too cold to sweat. In the summer, one day does a shirt in!

I’ll also add that, I do have a laundry sink in the shop. If you can swing the plumbing, it’s well worth the cost. I use that sink constantly and it would be an extreme inconvenience to be without it. Also, even if you change clothes before going back in the house, the dust on your hands/face/hair goes with you. With the sink you could wash all that off too.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View pottz's profile

pottz

5552 posts in 1403 days


#15 posted 06-27-2019 05:17 PM



My wife abhors dirt. So, I keep an outfit or two right outside the shop door and change before I go in to work and again before I go back into the living space. Once that outfit needs laundering, I shake it out, put it in a trash bag and take it to the laundry room. Everybody s happy ;-) I will say that in the winter I can wear the same outfit for weeks because it s too cold to sweat. In the summer, one day does a shirt in!

I ll also add that, I do have a laundry sink in the shop. If you can swing the plumbing, it s well worth the cost. I use that sink constantly and it would be an extreme inconvenience to be without it. Also, even if you change clothes before going back in the house, the dust on your hands/face/hair goes with you. With the sink you could wash all that off too.

- HokieKen


ditto a sink is a great thing in the shop,if i had to do all the things i use my shop sink for in the house,well id probably be living in my shop-LOL.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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