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Outfeed Table Design - PM1000

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Forum topic by MadMarti posted 06-19-2019 09:00 PM 304 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MadMarti

2 posts in 30 days


06-19-2019 09:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw outfeed angle bar question

Good Afternoon, All -

I received a PM1000 with the 52” capacity for Father’s Day this past weekend (very lucky). Upgraded from a small job site saw and this is my first cabinet style saw. I want to build an outfeed table that extends the full width of the saw table and out around 42”. I have looked at hundreds of pictures, watched dozens of videos and read a few articles, but thought it may be best just to ask you all.

My main question/concern is regarding the butting of the outfeed table to the saw table. While I know I want to be 1/16” under on the outfeed side, how do I account for the 1.5” space created by the angle bar?

Is it necessary to butt the two tops together, or do you feel leaving the gap would be okay (I plan on routing the miter slots through to the outfeed top)?

If you feel it is necessary to butt them together, any pointers on getting a smooth transition? The angle bar and related bolts create quite a few various “levels” that I need to account for.


9 replies so far

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

1996 posts in 2122 days


#1 posted 06-20-2019 12:26 AM

No expert here, but I don’t think they have to butt together. I have seen many that use adjustable roller stand, work tables, etc., that do not butt up and they seem to work fine. I am building an attached fold down out feed table for my saw right now and there will be a gap of an inch or so. Just my opinion and like I stated, not an expert.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View Davevand's profile

Davevand

123 posts in 1255 days


#2 posted 06-20-2019 02:48 PM

I laminated a 1” and 3/4” pieces together x 4-3/4” and bolted it to the angle iron. Round over the inside bottom and it will fit very close to the angle iron. This set it back so I could still use the dust port. I still need to work on the support for the flip top, my original idea did not work.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1494 posts in 1913 days


#3 posted 06-20-2019 03:11 PM

Having a gap between out feed table and saw is OK.
One some saws the fence clamps to back rail, and you must leave a gap.
Like this Ridgid contractor saw, and the out feed table built for it.

The gap was created by stacking 2 pieces of angle on top of each (facing opposite direction), and bolt on each end to keep them attached to each other. The out feed table was supported by angle stock on saw.

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1417 posts in 3268 days


#4 posted 06-20-2019 03:40 PM

You’re fine with a gap between the table and the saw, 99.99% of the items you’ll be sawing are rigid enough to span the gap. I set mine up 3/4” behind the rear fence rail, and the only time there are issues are with laminate or veneer that can fall off the rear of the saw.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View MadMarti's profile

MadMarti

2 posts in 30 days


#5 posted 06-20-2019 03:45 PM



No expert here, but I don t think they have to butt together. I have seen many that use adjustable roller stand, work tables, etc., that do not butt up and they seem to work fine. I am building an attached fold down out feed table for my saw right now and there will be a gap of an inch or so. Just my opinion and like I stated, not an expert.

- PaulDoug

Thanks for the input! Good luck with your build.


I laminated a 1” and 3/4” pieces together x 4-3/4” and bolted it to the angle iron. Round over the inside bottom and it will fit very close to the angle iron. This set it back so I could still use the dust port. I still need to work on the support for the flip top, my original idea did not work.

- Davevand

This was likely going to be my next step but would like to avoid the extra work if a gap is fine. Thank you for your input.


Having a gap between out feed table and saw is OK.
One some saws the fence clamps to back rail, and you must leave a gap.
Like this Ridgid contractor saw, and the out feed table built for it.

The gap was created by stacking 2 pieces of angle on top of each (facing opposite direction), and bolt on each end to keep them attached to each other. The out feed table was supported by angle stock on saw.

YMMV

- CaptainKlutz

Awesome! Thanks, Cap.

View tywalt's profile

tywalt

58 posts in 583 days


#6 posted 06-20-2019 05:38 PM



You re fine with a gap between the table and the saw, 99.99% of the items you ll be sawing are rigid enough to span the gap. I set mine up 3/4” behind the rear fence rail, and the only time there are issues are with laminate or veneer that can fall off the rear of the saw.

- ChefHDAN


Agreed. I will often cover the gap with a length of 2” blue tape (my gap is only about an inch). I stick it to my fence rail in lieu of the actual saw top to prevent veneer from peeling it up. It basically creates a ramp between the fence rail and outfeed top so if something does dip, it doesn’t get stuck on the edge of the outfeed.

-- Tyler - Central TX

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5452 posts in 2770 days


#7 posted 06-20-2019 06:45 PM

I put my outfeed table on wheels, so I can bring it up close or move it back for long boards, or move it out of the way entirely. It has worked well.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

140 posts in 130 days


#8 posted 06-20-2019 07:47 PM

When I built my folding outfeed table for my C’man 10”, it’s a full 1 1/2” past the back of the cast iron table:

No problems with it. And it’s one of those things that ya wonder how and the heck did I get by without an outfeed table…

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

View clin's profile

clin

1039 posts in 1415 days


#9 posted 06-20-2019 11:08 PM

I just set mine up on top of the angle iron. I think I had to recess some areas of the outfeed table frame for some bolt heads, And I had to drill a few holes in the angle to run screws up into the frame of the outfeed table. Because the angle iron was a bit small compared to the size frame I wanted to support the outfeed table, I notched it and made the frame a bit smaller where it overlapped the angle iron. You can just make that out in the photo below in the upper right corner.

Mine also happens to fold down.

-- Clin

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