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Forum topic by emorales posted 06-16-2019 01:44 AM 449 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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emorales

2 posts in 38 days


06-16-2019 01:44 AM

Greetings,
Great forum been binge reading a lot. Well I’m a total newbie to woodworking like 0 experience and been looking to get into it as hooby. Im about to get myself some tools as fathers day gift and need some pointers as to what to buy first, what not to buy, what clamps are most usefull, any pointer or advice is more than welcomed also links and or videos are welcomed also.

Thanks,


23 replies so far

View SSotolongo's profile

SSotolongo

55 posts in 119 days


#1 posted 06-16-2019 02:37 PM

There are quite a few youtube channels out there that will show you some of the basics of wood working like setting up your shop, safety on using some of the tools and even basic skills. Tool wise, it all depends on what you want to do but the basics are going to be a drill and impact driver, router, miter saw, table saw and a shop vac. Yes shop vac. You have no idea how much saw dust you’ll produce. You can get a decent drill set at Home Depot or Lowe’s. A good drill set is a good thing to have because things always need retightnening around the house. Just know when you buy one brand you may be locking yourself into that brand because each brand makes batteries that only work for their brand and there are many additional tools that you may want to add as you go along.

Do a fair amount of research on table saws. A lot of newbies end up buying a job site saw and then realize its underpowered. You’ll see a lot of them on craigslist. A quality table saw can be pricey new, so you might want to consider looking for a used one. It’s also not advisable to go all out on a cabinet saw for a newbie. You might not even need one for what you’ll be doing. At least not early on.

Buying from Harbor Freight is like talking about Trump. You either love it, or think it’s Chinese dry wall. I have no hesitation buying clamps from there and have a collection of them in different sizes. You’ll need a fair amount of those.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#2 posted 06-16-2019 03:00 PM

For battery tools, Milwaukee is the brand most often seen on construction jobs. I have been using them on the job over 6 years, and they are tough. I rarely see other brands on the job. Probably because the jobs that had others had the most tools that didn’t work. Maybe a little more money, but I bought all Milwaukee tools at big orange at Christmas to replace my old tools with worn out batteries.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5457 posts in 2773 days


#3 posted 06-16-2019 04:06 PM

The best way to get into this without buying tools that you don’t need, is to select a project and then buy only the tools you need for that project. Start simple, like making a pair of saw horses. Then over time take on more challenging projects and acquire the tools you need for that. If you are like most people you won’t be able to afford an entire shop of tools all at once, be patient it takes time.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View EdDantes's profile

EdDantes

73 posts in 333 days


#4 posted 06-18-2019 07:34 PM

Take all of the following with a grain of salt. Just my opinions who was in your shoes about 10 years ago and have slowly acquired tools and learned a few skills.

First, figure out how much space you’ll have for your work area. Will you have room for expansion? If you have a small area, it doesn’t often make sense to take up a large percentage of it with items like a table saw. There are many different ways to accomplish specific tasks/projects, and fitting your tools to your workflow is important.

Second, always be conscious about where you can save money on tools, where you can buy cheap now and upgrade later, or where it makes sense to spend more the first time around. Despite the common refrain, spending money on a better brand/model doesn’t always make sense. This is especially true as you’re just getting into the hobby and seeing if it’s something you will pursue. Frr example, for the number of times I break out a belt sander or angle grinder, the cheapo Harbor Freight versions are adequate. If i were going to be using them on a weekly basis, or needed some specific functionality, I’d spend money on something nicer.

Along this line, always take a look at Craigslist/Facebook/etc. for second hand tools. It’s a great way to save money, and older tools (especially the bigger pieces like table saws, drill presses, band saws) can outlive you if taken care of well. Often some look beaten up, but just need a bit of cleaning, some new belts, or other light maintenance. Learning how to care for/repair these toools is part of the fun (in my opinion), and actually easier than you would think.

Start out with a drill/driver combo. Assume that the brand you get for this will be the brand you generally stick with for cordless tools. THis is one area where buying quality up front. Common “quality” brands you will see frequently include DeWalt, Milwaukee, Bosch. Next stop probably Rigid. Were I to do it again, I might consider the Bosch Flexiclick. Though I’d still probably feel the need to get a 20V drill/driver combo for bigger jobs.

Avoid the desire to go out and buy a table saw first. THis is something where it makes sense to spend money up hfront, and doing so without knowing if its going to be a long term hobby isn’t great. You can also replace the majority of a table saw’s functionality with other tools that are arguably more flexible. With that being said, I’d add a circular saw. I use the Makita 5007MG and have no complaints. I’ve since added a 6 1/2” cordless DeWalt to use for quick jobs or in places without an outlet. With this, make your first project something like the Engler Cutting Grid and cutting guides which will let you break down sheet goods and make finish-cuts with the circular saw. There’s an argument to be made to just start out with a tack saw, which some people use in lieu of a table saw. There are many videos showing how people have used a track saw and jigs/tables to replace a panel saw, table saw and miter saw.

With the drill and saw, you can do many of your “first projects”. You’ll also likely want to pick up a random orbit sander early on. But after that I’d probably get a single bevel miter saw. Others may call this an extravagance, but for some things I find it very convenient (especially if you don’t have a table saw). I’d also advocate, depending on your chosen projects, for looking early at a table top drill press and band saw (~9”). These are also things that commonly show up second hand in the $100-$150 range. The drill press really made me more efficient, and the band saw opened up some possibilities.

For commonly used hand tools (socket set, pliers, etc.) and clamps I’ve been content with Harbor Freight stuff.

View pottz's profile

pottz

5562 posts in 1406 days


#5 posted 06-18-2019 07:50 PM



The best way to get into this without buying tools that you don t need, is to select a project and then buy only the tools you need for that project. Start simple, like making a pair of saw horses. Then over time take on more challenging projects and acquire the tools you need for that. If you are like most people you won t be able to afford an entire shop of tools all at once, be patient it takes time.

- bondogaposis


+1 i totally agree with bondo,i can tell what i think is best but it’s worthless for what you may need to do the kind of projects you will make.pick something to make then see what tool are needed.ive been doing this for over 40 years and im still aquiring new tools as i evolve.it can be a very expensive hobby so spend your money wisely.the main thing is have fun.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View MSquared's profile (online now)

MSquared

598 posts in 336 days


#6 posted 06-18-2019 08:01 PM

DO NOT! listen to anybody on Lumberjocks!!..... Kidding!!! ;) Nothing could be further from the truth! The members here are extremely generous with their wealth of knowledge, expertise in many areas, as well as their ‘time’ to answer your questions. You have landed in a good place. Follow threads on related topics that you are curious about and you’ll pick up some great information. Beware though … there’s a fair amount of ribbing that goes on here! It’s good natured. Some can be opinionated, but that comes from solid experience.

P.S.; All of the prior answers are absolutely great advice. As is the norm here….

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1006 posts in 1532 days


#7 posted 06-18-2019 08:08 PM

I agree with a lot thats been said here, although saw horses done properly are definitely not a simple 1st project, and its utter rot that Milwaukee are the best and only reliable power tools.
Be sure to post your first project and ask for critique.
Regards
Anthm

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View pottz's profile

pottz

5562 posts in 1406 days


#8 posted 06-18-2019 10:08 PM



For battery tools, Milwaukee is the brand most often seen on construction jobs. I have been using them on the job over 6 years, and they are tough. I rarely see other brands on the job. Probably because the jobs that had others had the most tools that didn t work. Maybe a little more money, but I bought all Milwaukee tools at big orange at Christmas to replace my old tools with worn out batteries.

- ibewjon


must be the area you live in because in the so cal area makita is the top cordless brand i never see milwaukee cordless tools used here.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View mike02719's profile

mike02719

120 posts in 4208 days


#9 posted 06-18-2019 10:40 PM

Boy did you get some advice! I agree with some and disagree with others. One LJ said you should obtain what you need to do the job at hand. This would be my advice because I did this. However, I bought my home and made improvements using this guide. I should have made some kind of bench early on. This would have made things much easier. You will do OK and soon have a great collection of tools. Good Luck and be sure to post your progress.

-- Mike, Massachusetts

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

685 posts in 3215 days


#10 posted 06-18-2019 10:44 PM

Area for tools may be. I have not seen Makita on a job since 2002. I recently purchased a
Milwaukee to replace my Makita. Not saying there are not other brands, just my experience like any other opinions.

View MSquared's profile (online now)

MSquared

598 posts in 336 days


#11 posted 06-18-2019 10:44 PM

How would you folks rate Rigid and Ryobi?

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

528 posts in 601 days


#12 posted 06-19-2019 01:03 AM



How would you folks rate Rigid and Ryobi?

- MSquared

Hit or miss.

I have taken rigid/ryobi tools back in less than an hour cause they sucked so bad.

I also really like a few of the ryobi things I have for the price I paid.

View emorales's profile

emorales

2 posts in 38 days


#13 posted 06-19-2019 01:43 AM

Thank you all for the advice. And well I took the first plunge and after carefully deciding and looking at tools I alrady owned and what was recommended I bought Boch Random orbit sander, 2 f style clamps, 4 quick grip clamos, jigsaw, speed square, kregg r3 pocket hole, Ryobi 18v Circular Saw, Ryobi 18v router, ryobi impact driver, already had 18v drill, makita drill hammer, makita grinder. Still looking at table and or miter saw.

Now that thats done. What do you guys recommend as far as a good first project. I’m neediing a dog house so was thinking that but dont know if its overwhelming. Anyway thanks again for the help. Looking foward to reading the suggestions andn feedback

View MSquared's profile (online now)

MSquared

598 posts in 336 days


#14 posted 06-19-2019 01:48 AM

Build the Dog House. If you’re married, you may need it!

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View EdDantes's profile

EdDantes

73 posts in 333 days


#15 posted 06-19-2019 11:33 AM

Good luck and enjoy.

Though if you’d let me offer one comment on your purchases: You might think about switching out the router, grinder and hammer drill for the miter saw. Unless you have a specific project in mind, the uses for a router usually come later. The grinder is great if you’re frequently working with metal, but not necessarily woodworking. And unless you need to drill concrete/brick for a project, the hammer drill will sit for awhile.

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