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Bosch Oscillating Tool speed selection .

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Forum topic by sportflyer1 posted 06-14-2019 11:25 PM 251 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sportflyer1

27 posts in 1624 days


06-14-2019 11:25 PM

Purchased a Bosch Var speed osc tool. How do I select the tool rpm ( speed ) to suit the material I cut? Example if cutting nails do I use max speed? Is there a speed- usage table somewhere ? Thanks


11 replies so far

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SMP

1199 posts in 328 days


#1 posted 06-15-2019 12:12 AM

Well, i just use max speed and have at least one extra battery charged because it sucks batteries like crazy at max. But when i used lower speeds it gets stuck sometimes and makes the most horrendous noise and rattles my eardrums.

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ArtMann

1399 posts in 1238 days


#2 posted 06-15-2019 01:16 AM

I have the same opinion of speed controls on oscillating multitools that I have for variable speed miter saws. The adjustment could just as easily read “Better” and “Worse” as “Fast” and “Slow”.

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SMP

1199 posts in 328 days


#3 posted 06-15-2019 02:08 AM



I have the same opinion of speed controls on oscillating multitools that I have for variable speed miter saws. The adjustment could just as easily read “Better” and “Worse” as “Fast” and “Slow”.

- ArtMann

For jig saws, could say “cut” and “bounce up and down”

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runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2447 days


#4 posted 06-17-2019 04:09 AM

I have gotten excellent performance out of a couple of HF’s cheapest (single speed) oscillating tools. They have a variable speed model, but I have never felt a need for slower speeds. It’s possible, though, that a slower speed would be better for cutting nails. Anyone know about this?

I use mine in just about all the ways they suggest; plunge cutting, sanding, lino removal, etc. I rarely use my reciprocating saw anymore.

By the way, Grizzly has the best prices for blades that I have seen, and they have a universal base that fits just about any tool.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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SMP

1199 posts in 328 days


#5 posted 06-17-2019 04:45 AM


By the way, Grizzly has the best prices for blades that I have seen, and they have a universal base that fits just about any tool.

- runswithscissors

How do those last? I bought some cheap ones at a big box store and could literally watch them burn up while plunge cutting MDF molding. I want some good priced omes that hold up at least a little while.

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sportflyer1

27 posts in 1624 days


#6 posted 06-17-2019 07:00 PM

The Grizzly blades may not fit the Bosch multitool because it needs starlock blades. Some of the Grizzly blades look like they might fit but no way to tell .

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runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2447 days


#7 posted 06-17-2019 07:49 PM

I think Grizzly’s hold up as well as others. They do tend to create a lot of smoke when plunge cutting, but I think that’s the nature of the beast, as a lot of friction is created. For wood I like the coarse toothed ones that are similar to the tooth style on a Japanese pull saw.

For nail cutting, even Lennox reciprocating saw blades wear out fast. I did see video one time of a oscillating blade that could cut dozens of nails, but I don’t remember the brand, and remain somewhat skeptical about this claim.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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SMP

1199 posts in 328 days


#8 posted 06-17-2019 08:29 PM



I think Grizzly s hold up as well as others. They do tend to create a lot of smoke when plunge cutting, but I think that s the nature of the beast, as a lot of friction is created. For wood I like the coarse toothed ones that are similar to the tooth style on a Japanese pull saw.

For nail cutting, even Lennox reciprocating saw blades wear out fast. I did see video one time of a oscillating blade that could cut dozens of nails, but I don t remember the brand, and remain somewhat skeptical about this claim.

- runswithscissors

I’ll have to give them a shot next time I order. For nails, I stick to my dremel with cutoff wheels, it works great and the discs are pennies. My main use of the oscillating multi tool is plunge cutting into molding, usually baseboards and door moldings. Really nothing else comes close to working as good for this particular use case.

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sportflyer1

27 posts in 1624 days


#9 posted 06-19-2019 03:53 PM

New question: I need to trim about 1/8 inch off a piece of Hardie plank at one end. It’s at tight spot , where the osc tool fits well. What kind of blade can I use for this ? Tks

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HokieKen

9974 posts in 1560 days


#10 posted 06-19-2019 05:08 PM

As a general rule, the harder the material you’re cutting, the slower your speed needs to be. Like I said though, that’s just a general rule. An oscillating tool is kind of a different animal than most tools. My general thinking is to just set it where it cuts efficiently and doesn’t burn up blades too quickly.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2447 days


#11 posted 06-19-2019 05:45 PM

I haven’t worked with Hardie plank, but it’s pretty hard, I think. I know a diamond blade is available from HF, and blades imbedded with carbide as well. I used a diamond blade to cut out a 2’ X 3’ hole in my kitchen ceiling for a skylight. It cut through plaster and wire lath with amazing ease. I got sparks as I went through the steel lath. But that was a semi circular blade which might not fit in your tight spot.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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