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Dado across board too long to support on table saw. Suggestions?

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Forum topic by nickbatz posted 06-13-2019 02:27 AM 1139 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nickbatz

220 posts in 475 days


06-13-2019 02:27 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak

I ended up using a plunge router, and it worked fine, but next time I’d like to use my table saw.

The boards I needed to dado (is that what slots for a quasi double lap joint with a full layout sukahara half twist are called when they’re at the very end?) are 5’ long by 12” wide, solid 4/4 oak.

My table saw is a Craftman 315.228310, and the wings don’t go out far enough to support the 5’ long boards. I tried screwing in support pieces to the edge of a crosscut sled, and I have a Ridgid Flip Top Work Support (which is fabulous, by the way).

Nope. The board wiggled.

I’m going to try making a wider crosscut sled, but does anyone have any better ideas?

Thanks!


32 replies so far

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AlaskaGuy

5284 posts in 2704 days


#1 posted 06-13-2019 03:47 AM

I don’t know how big you saw table is and all that so this is just food for thought.

I’ve made a ton of dados/rabbets on the end of 12”x96’ pieces of plywood. I keep a couple of 20 lbs sand bag around for such occasions.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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bandit571

22999 posts in 3078 days


#2 posted 06-13-2019 04:15 AM

They make a roller stand for tablesaws…get the one with the ball bearings instead of the rollers….set it up halfway between the end of the saw and the end of the board…the stand will support the end of the board…like having an extra wing on the side of the saw’s top…

Adjust the height of the stand, so the board sits level…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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nickbatz

220 posts in 475 days


#3 posted 06-13-2019 05:28 AM

A sandbag! Great idea, AlaskaGuy, thanks.

My table saw is a Craftsman contractor model, and I think its extension wings are 1’ wide. It didn’t occur to me to use the fence instead of a crosscut sled. Will give it a try.

bandid571, instead of a roller stand I have one of these. It’s really great – incredibly useful.

But I may have had it too far back. Will try it halfway. Thanks.

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2943 posts in 2370 days


#4 posted 06-13-2019 05:35 AM

When the piece is too big, move the tool to the piece, not the piece to the tool.i don’t use routers much, but this is a situation where I would use one.

-- Paul, Duvall, WA

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nickbatz

220 posts in 475 days


#5 posted 06-13-2019 05:45 AM



When the piece is too big, move the tool to the piece, not the piece to the tool.i don’t use routers much, but this is a situation where I would use one.

Makes sense. And yeah, that’s what I did, and it worked very well. I also used a circular saw to cut the pieces to size for the same reason, and I’ll have to use it again for even larger ones.

The only problem with using the router was that it was a bitch to get perfectly straight. But like everything else, it’ll go faster next time now that I have the feel for it.

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therealSteveN

2876 posts in 969 days


#6 posted 06-13-2019 06:08 AM



They make a roller stand for tablesaws…get the one with the ball bearings instead of the rollers….set it up halfway between the end of the saw and the end of the board…the stand will support the end of the board…like having an extra wing on the side of the saw s top…

Adjust the height of the stand, so the board sits level…

- bandit571

Exactly

Rockler sells one seen here.

Or roll your own with these mounted on a 2x4, and make a stand from more 2x4's

-- Think safe, be safe

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5284 posts in 2704 days


#7 posted 06-13-2019 07:18 AM


A sandbag! Great idea, AlaskaGuy, thanks.

My table saw is a Craftsman contractor model, and I think its extension wings are 1 wide. It didn t occur to me to use the fence instead of a crosscut sled. Will give it a try.

bandid571, instead of a roller stand I have one of these. It s really great – incredibly useful.

But I may have had it too far back. Will try it halfway. Thanks.

- nickbatz


I should have mentioned in my first post. If you try this method your saw need to be properly tune and both the saw table top and the fence need to be well waxed. You don’t want to lose control because the stock starts hanging up.

I have a lot of time on table saw so I feel comfortable with this. If it doesn’t feel good, then don’t do it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Lazyman

3433 posts in 1782 days


#8 posted 06-13-2019 12:34 PM


The only problem with using the router was that it was a bitch to get perfectly straight. But like everything else, it ll go faster next time now that I have the feel for it.

- nickbatz

You just need to get yourself a rabbeting bit for your router. It will have a bearing that will follow the edge and as long as the edge is straight will give you perfectly straight rabbet each time.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2241 posts in 3033 days


#9 posted 06-13-2019 12:55 PM

I use my radial arm saw for that. With a dado stack.
Because you are coming down instead of up, you need a few test cuts to dial in the depth.
But after that, you can cut them all one after another.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9599 posts in 1534 days


#10 posted 06-13-2019 01:18 PM

IMHO, a table saw is the least safe and most inconvenient way one could cut that rabbet. Router would definitely be my first choice. Clamp a board across the width for your router base to register on to keep it straight. Or, like Nathan said, get a rabbeting router bit so you just have to let the bearing ride the edge. Not saying it can’t be done on the table saw. Just saying, I would avoid it.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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ArtMann

1386 posts in 1211 days


#11 posted 06-13-2019 01:22 PM

What you cut was not termed a “dado”. That was a rabbet. Dados are across the grain but are not on the edge. Grooves are like dados but are cut with the grain. I don’t understand why you would want to cut a rabbet like that on a table saw when it would be so much easier to do with a router with an attached edge guide or a rabbeting bit.

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bondogaposis

5414 posts in 2746 days


#12 posted 06-13-2019 01:32 PM

I think using a rabbet bit in a hand held router would be far easier than trying to do it on the table saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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pottz

5326 posts in 1379 days


#13 posted 06-13-2019 02:01 PM



IMHO, a table saw is the least safe and most inconvenient way one could cut that rabbet. Router would definitely be my first choice. Clamp a board across the width for your router base to register on to keep it straight. Or, like Nathan said, get a rabbeting router bit so you just have to let the bearing ride the edge. Not saying it can t be done on the table saw. Just saying, I would avoid it.

- HokieKen

ditto,this is how i would do it also.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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MrRon

5501 posts in 3638 days


#14 posted 06-13-2019 03:37 PM

The router is the only right tool for this operation, unless you have a sliding table saw.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2241 posts in 3033 days


#15 posted 06-13-2019 05:13 PM


The router is the only right tool for this operation, unless you have a sliding table saw.

- MrRon


... Or a radial arm saw
... Or a Stanley no 78 plane.
... Or a no 45 plane
... Or a handsaw, chisel and router plane and your name is Paul Sellers

showing 1 through 15 of 32 replies

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