LumberJocks

How do you suggest I fasten maple to the frame of this storage bench for a seamless look?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by tcaz posted 06-12-2019 06:34 PM 832 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View tcaz's profile

tcaz

6 posts in 228 days


06-12-2019 06:34 PM

My initial thought is to countersink, glue, screw, and conceal screws with matching plugs. I’m afraid it won’t allow for proper wood movement though. I live in an area that doesn’t have wild seasonal shifts so feel a bit better about that. But I am taking precautions when milling before it’s time to assemble; acclimate stock inside the house, mill to rough dimensions, bring stock back inside after being in the shop, mill to final dimensions before assembly (obviously the maple in photo is incomplete). The bench is 72”x16”x18” if that helps. Face boards will end up <3 /> after final plane.

Any other ideas or am I overthinking it?

Sorry, 2/3 photos came out sideways..


6 replies so far

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1442 posts in 2506 days


#1 posted 06-12-2019 06:52 PM

Think of the maple as a table top and attach it the way table tops are attached. figure 8 fasteners, z -clips, elongated screw holes will all work. Add benefit is that you can work from the back rather than trying to line up plugs to cover screws from the front.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

515 posts in 2127 days


#2 posted 06-12-2019 07:47 PM

Maybe consider using plywood and screwing in from the back? If you’re set on using solid wood you could think of it like wood flooring and do some sort of T&G joinery and secure at the T. Maybe route a slot in the “studs” and screw through the slot—so the screw can move with any seasonal changes?

View tcaz's profile

tcaz

6 posts in 228 days


#3 posted 06-13-2019 08:44 PM

I like the idea of using figure 8s. Would you say I should glue up the front (and sides) to create larger panels? Originally I was thinking attach board by board. I guess my concern is if I glue up the face panel, then there will be some wonkiness as the front would be 72×16” and the 4 boards will be pretty thin once they’re dimensioned. I started with 4/4 stock.


Think of the maple as a table top and attach it the way table tops are attached. figure 8 fasteners, z -clips, elongated screw holes will all work. Add benefit is that you can work from the back rather than trying to line up plugs to cover screws from the front.

- JADobson

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1442 posts in 2506 days


#4 posted 06-13-2019 09:49 PM

Depends on what you are looking for. If you want a seamless look you’ll have to glue it up as a panel. If you want the boards to be separated my suggestions probably won’t help that much but depending on the width of your boards you may be able to just get away with screwing them down (still using an elongated hole). A single narrow board won’t move too much.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View tcaz's profile

tcaz

6 posts in 228 days


#5 posted 06-13-2019 10:54 PM

A seamless look is the goal. Ideally, I’d like to glue it up, only I’m having difficulty getting the 72” boards squared up. A total of 4 boards to make up the 16” width (4” each). They’re on the brink of square, but getting thinner each pass. Lol.. I generally build small projects out of my small shop, so this is the largest build to date.

Excuses aside, I think I’ll aim for a glue up with figure 8 fasteners. I’m not too savy on the elongated hole technique, but would like to learn more so that I have a plan B.


Depends on what you are looking for. If you want a seamless look you ll have to glue it up as a panel. If you want the boards to be separated my suggestions probably won t help that much but depending on the width of your boards you may be able to just get away with screwing them down (still using an elongated hole). A single narrow board won t move too much.

- JADobson

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

497 posts in 574 days


#6 posted 06-13-2019 11:04 PM

Get rid of the frame and glue up panels with a plywood bottom. The maple is plenty strong to support anything you put on in. Miter the corners with lock miter bit. Back it up with a few corner blocks. Put a small frame around the inside/top to help it stay square.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com