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Forum topic by Scon7391 posted 06-12-2019 04:52 AM 280 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Scon7391

6 posts in 14 days


06-12-2019 04:52 AM

Hello everyone and thanks for the invite! Taking a step away from auto mechanics and new to the woodworking world. I am wanting to take on a kitchen table project however am a little unsure of what wood I have. I have a two story barn built somewhere between 1900 and 1950 I assume (wire nails used) and the sawn lumber I want to use are true 1” x 10×16 or so. The 10 and 16 are “give or take” seems nothing is identical. Are these white oak pieces? Thank you!!!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/psyw2h2.jpg!


11 replies so far

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HokieKen

9599 posts in 1534 days


#1 posted 06-12-2019 03:15 PM

Very likely White Oak. Would need to see some sections of face and end grain cleaned up with a plane or chisel to be able to say with any confidence though.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Scon7391

6 posts in 14 days


#2 posted 06-12-2019 03:22 PM

Hello Kenny, thank you! I will go out in a bit and clean up an area and take another pic. I mainly wanted to make sure the wood was safe to use for kitchen table top and also keep the sewn marks and was thinking possibly knocking off the rough stuff with some 80 or 120 then do the poly / resin stuff to seal it? ...thanks again! Sean

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Scon7391

6 posts in 14 days


#3 posted 06-12-2019 03:32 PM

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HokieKen

9599 posts in 1534 days


#4 posted 06-12-2019 03:37 PM

Nope, that’s pine.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Steve

1283 posts in 977 days


#5 posted 06-12-2019 03:43 PM

Would that be considered “old growth” pine?

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Scon7391

6 posts in 14 days


#6 posted 06-12-2019 03:46 PM

Awesome! Thanks guys! So being “old growth pine” are there any precautions or just sand stain and treat as normal?

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HokieKen

9599 posts in 1534 days


#7 posted 06-12-2019 03:49 PM

I don’t think so Steve. I think it has to be 200 years old to be considered old growth. Although I’m not really sure how you can tell if you can’t count the growth rings.

Scon, this should be safe for a kitchen table as long as it wasn’t treated with any chemicals.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Scon7391

6 posts in 14 days


#8 posted 06-12-2019 03:55 PM

I’m in the process of tearing down the two story barn and wanting a garage there in the future the barn external and internal walls are with these 1×10x most of 16-20’ lengths. I’m assuming the 2×12-16’s footers are pine as well? Trying to find some good use of the wood for tables and dressers and such for me to work with.

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Scon7391

6 posts in 14 days


#9 posted 06-12-2019 04:04 PM

I take it these 2x’s are pine as well?

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ibewjon

604 posts in 3188 days


#10 posted 06-12-2019 05:15 PM

Old growth usually has thinner rings because the old trees were closer together. It may be second growth after the original forest was cut. Maybe southern yellow pine?

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Greg66

30 posts in 53 days


#11 posted 06-13-2019 04:33 PM

That’s southern yellow pine and it is not old growth. Typically old growth lumber will have over 40 growth rings per inch. It will still make a beautiful table.

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