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Epoxy Accelerator

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Forum topic by NCMau posted 06-11-2019 11:10 PM 455 views 1 time favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NCMau

51 posts in 146 days


06-11-2019 11:10 PM

I just got some epoxy A&B glue but I would like to speed up the process. I am working with 8oz bottles. Any suggestions on the type of accelerator? Can CA glue accelerator be used with epoxy?

-- Maury, NC


21 replies so far

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#1 posted 06-11-2019 11:30 PM

Did you buy 5 minute epoxy? That’ll be plenty fast. If you got a slower curing one, the only thing that’ll affect it is heat. Best thing to do is go get some 5-minute epoxy.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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pottz

5326 posts in 1379 days


#2 posted 06-12-2019 12:05 AM



Did you buy 5 minute epoxy? That ll be plenty fast. If you got a slower curing one, the only thing that ll affect it is heat. Best thing to do is go get some 5-minute epoxy.

- Rich


yeah 5 minutes isn’t fast enough,i find it’s too fast even when im in a hurry.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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SMP

1058 posts in 301 days


#3 posted 06-12-2019 02:08 AM

You talking 2 part epoxy? Or epoxy resin with liquid catalyst?

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ArtMann

1386 posts in 1211 days


#4 posted 06-12-2019 02:49 AM

To answer your question directly, no, CA glue is an entirely different chemistry than epoxy and CA accelerators can’t be used to shorten the cure time. Professional grade epoxies can be bought with slow or quick hardeners but none of them are going to be any faster than the 5 minute epoxy you can buy. As someone already mentioned, heat will speed cure time somewhat.

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NCMau

51 posts in 146 days


#5 posted 06-12-2019 12:28 PM

Yes I use the 2 parts A&B and it takes hours before it cures. I am just experimenting to fill a small area with epoxy and color. I built a dam with hot glue but the area to be filled is not flat and the glue would run off.

I need to apply a fairly stiff consistency. I tried this approach unfortunately, I waited too long (few hours) and the glue was too stiff to work. I suppose I could work in two or more stages but it is too time consuming.

So if an accelerator is not available as in CA glue, I guess the 5 min epoxy would be the choice.

-- Maury, NC

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#6 posted 06-12-2019 12:58 PM


I need to apply a fairly stiff consistency.

- NCMau

That one’s easy. Get some silica and add it gradually until you get the consistency you want. You can definitely make it so it will not flow.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1835 posts in 558 days


#7 posted 06-12-2019 01:01 PM

could you expand a little on your project (with some photos) ?
there are several types of epoxy and most have different characteristics.
the biggest difference that I find is structural bonding epoxy and clear casting epoxy or resin.
and you can order what you need with a specific setting time.
you must be aware of the chemistry that some epoxies and resins produce an extreme amount
of exothermic heat if it is too thick and cures too fast.
I have had some that cured so fast it turned from clear to dark amber, smoked and
cracked in a matter of minutes.
there is a steep learning curve when it comes to materials such as epoxy and resins.
and the old adage of “One Size fits Most” does not apply to these materials.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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NCMau

51 posts in 146 days


#8 posted 06-12-2019 08:30 PM

I guess the epoxy I am using is called 2 parts clear casting. I just want to fill a burl depression with some color. Again, as I said, this is just an experiment, maybe for a later project.
The idea of using silica sounds good. The one I found SILICA comes in quart tub. Is this what I need?

-- Maury, NC

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#9 posted 06-12-2019 08:50 PM


The one I found SILICA comes in quart tub. Is this what I need?

- NCMau

Yes it is.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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ArtMann

1386 posts in 1211 days


#10 posted 06-12-2019 11:43 PM

Extremely fine sanding dust will also work. It can be purchased under the name “wood flour” but it is nothing but fine sanding dust. I have used it straight out of the filter on my random orbital sander. The mix is very often used to glue plywood “stitch and glue” boats together.

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Bob5103

134 posts in 1229 days


#11 posted 06-13-2019 12:44 AM

You can also mix used, dry, coffee grounds, sawdust, etc…, to thicken epoxy.

View Chenier's profile

Chenier

4 posts in 102 days


#12 posted 06-13-2019 12:54 AM

Epoxy thickeners come with tradeoffs. The first is that none of them are transparent. When mixed into your clear casting epoxy it won’t be clear any longer.

The System Three Silica Thickener you refrenced will work very well for thickening your epoxy. It will also make it hard to work, sand or polish after the epoxy has hardened. Silica is rock. You’ll need to use a grinder and use a respirator (silica powder is the stuff of miner’s lung diseases). But having really hard epoxy may not be a bad thing depending on your applicaiton.

Expanded cellulose powder is a good, easy to work substitue for Silica. It’s the stuff disposable diapers are made of, before the baby gets ahold of em. If it’s good enough for a baby’s bottom… MAS sells it as “Cell-o-Fil”. Dunno what the other manufacturers call it.

Wood flour is fine too, but has a coarser texture than expanded cellulose. It’s the weapon of choice when circumstances dictate you need to build up something thick and your epoxy has to hold its shape, like putty.

Most epoxy manufacturers sell some type of microballoons. They can be used to bulk up epoxy to good effect and are easy to sand, but they’re not as good as thickening agents. They’re used as fillers in primer coats.

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#13 posted 06-13-2019 01:01 AM


The System Three Silica Thickener you refrenced will work very well for thickening your epoxy. It will also make it hard to work, sand or polish after the epoxy has hardened. Silica is rock. You ll need to use a grinder and use a respirator (silica powder is the stuff of miner s lung diseases). But having really hard epoxy may not be a bad thing depending on your applicaiton.

- Chenier

I use silica frequently when filling voids common in mesquite. It doesn’t affect the ability to sand the epoxy. It might originate as rock, but it doesn’t turn back to one…lol.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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MrUnix

7388 posts in 2594 days


#14 posted 06-13-2019 01:07 AM

Talc (aka: baby powder) also works well to thicken epoxy, and most people already have some on hand. And being white makes it easy to add color if desired.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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PCDub

142 posts in 639 days


#15 posted 06-13-2019 01:26 AM

Baby powder these days is cornstarch, not talc anymore…

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