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How to make cambered cauls

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Forum topic by therealSteveN posted 06-09-2019 05:02 PM 408 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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therealSteveN

2876 posts in 969 days


06-09-2019 05:02 PM

Another e-mail. I’m finding the tips on FWW to be pretty illuminating with some ideas. Not sure if all the noobs are aware. I see a lot of folks using flat stock for cauls, usually 2×4’s, Cambering them just a smidge gives much better pressure to the inner aspects of the glue up area. For me it’s the reason to use cauls.

As Asa mentioned they can also be done using a hand plane, the jointer is just much quicker. This is a safe jointer operation, using a stopped fence, but as with anything tool related if it makes you worry about safety, do it another way. I once saw a guy who sawed his out on a BS, and sanded to the line. They worked.

Thing is, cambered works better than flat, how you get to cambered is up to you. Also pay attention to using well prepped stock. Having them the same size, and shape is more important than not doing them. From that standpoint you could make a master, and pattern route out your others of that length.

30” does a great job on 24” down to 12” glue ups. If you are making a table top, make sure you extend past the edge width plenty enough to get a clamp on each side.

Asa Christiana cambering a caul on a jointer.

Enjoy.

-- Think safe, be safe


11 replies so far

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SMP

1058 posts in 301 days


#1 posted 06-09-2019 06:25 PM

Thats funny I just read that email last night and was going to link it here when i saw the title of this thread(thought you were asking how) Definitely on my to do list.

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therealSteveN

2876 posts in 969 days


#2 posted 06-09-2019 06:51 PM

If you make a few I think doing a Master and pattern routing the rest is the best way to assure them to be the same. You will get really consistent glue ups that way. The pressure across your glue up is same same same, making the boards all behave. No more talking about biscuits and such.

So many times we are trying to start out with stock that is already close to the thickness we want. You get some spreaders on a glue up, sure you can plane, wide belt sand them down. but you lose thickness real fast. With the cauls if you start at 3/4” you will pretty much end at 3/4” Just that little bit you lose with scrapers, sanders, and such.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Jerry

3187 posts in 2043 days


#3 posted 06-09-2019 07:18 PM

Brilliant!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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Jared_S

196 posts in 354 days


#4 posted 06-09-2019 07:50 PM

Just use a jig to make the cauls on a table saw. This method produces cauls with even clamping pressure.

The jig takes about 5 min to make, each caul then can be finished in under a minute.


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OSU55

2317 posts in 2384 days


#5 posted 06-10-2019 12:08 PM

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therealSteveN

2876 posts in 969 days


#6 posted 06-10-2019 04:53 PM

Yes I started making them back when I was young with a plane, then got to use the jointer. It was my first non traditional jointer use.

Jared, from the pics I am just lost enough not to get it. I think I can reason it out, but with the jig build, it isn’t going to be a first choice for me. But alas, as I always say. Lot of ways to skin a cat.

Today knowing what I know I would either use the jointer, or hand planes to make a Master, and pattern route a bunch more after I sanded out that Master to perfection. I have had several different widths at the same time, and depending on the job (length) I like a caul every 2’ of length. So an 8’ table would have 5. One each end, and every 2’. They could get underfoot, so I drill out a hole in one end of each, and run a leather boot lace through them. Hanging way up on the wall, they get out of the way till the next glue up.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Lazyman

3433 posts in 1782 days


#7 posted 06-10-2019 09:52 PM

Someone gave me a circa 1950 4” Rockwell jointer a few years ago and when I found a digital copy of the manual, one of the things it describes is how to use the jointer to put a taper on a leg. I use the same approach to make cauls. Similar to the approach in the video but I usually make more than one pass on each end. Each pass starts closer to the end so you get something that approximates a curve which is good for longer cauls.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Jared_S

196 posts in 354 days


#8 posted 06-11-2019 02:11 AM



Yes I started making them back when I was young with a plane, then got to use the jointer. It was my first non traditional jointer use.

Jared, from the pics I am just lost enough not to get it. I think I can reason it out, but with the jig build, it isn t going to be a first choice for me. But alas, as I always say. Lot of ways to skin a cat.

Today knowing what I know I would either use the jointer, or hand planes to make a Master, and pattern route a bunch more after I sanded out that Master to perfection. I have had several different widths at the same time, and depending on the job (length) I like a caul every 2 of length. So an 8 table would have 5. One each end, and every 2 . They could get underfoot, so I drill out a hole in one end of each, and run a leather boot lace through them. Hanging way up on the wall, they get out of the way till the next glue up.

- therealSteveN

The jig pulls the caul in the opposite direction of the final curve (center away from the blade). Then ypu just run it through the table saw, and out comes a perfect curve. The overall radius of the curve is adjusted by how far off center the caul is pulled in the jig.

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therealSteveN

2876 posts in 969 days


#9 posted 06-11-2019 12:52 PM

Gotcha. I could see that block midway, and figured it was pushing out the middle as the ends were held. Jointers and hand planes are still easier :-)

Just messing with ya. As stated, lotta ways to skin a cat, and if it works for you, that is the best way. Thanks for showing your way. From my view that is the best of a place like this, gives others who don’t have a “way” a chance to see a few and decide which way they wanna try.

-- Think safe, be safe

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MrRon

5501 posts in 3638 days


#10 posted 06-11-2019 07:07 PM

Big box 2×4’s are never straight. They have a camber that varies from stick to stick. You can find a 2×4 that meets the camber you want and use that for your caul. Just cut it to the length you want. Rip that 2×4 down the middle and it will warp even more. An easy way to make cauls.

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therealSteveN

2876 posts in 969 days


#11 posted 06-12-2019 06:05 PM

Would you cal that grading on the curve?

-- Think safe, be safe

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