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10 degree dado without dado stack

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Forum topic by wkossen posted 06-09-2019 01:05 PM 454 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wkossen

8 posts in 1292 days


06-09-2019 01:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: 10 degree dado question

Hi,

I need to make a drawer with 10 defree sides. I need a dado on both sides straight so it compensates for the 10 degree sloping sides. Dado stacks arent available in my country (Netherlands). How best to do this?

I thought about a sled with a 10degree bed for the table saw, and also about making a 10 degree sole for the router. Not sure if those are the best methods. So what would you do?

Thanks!


15 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8702 posts in 3024 days


#1 posted 06-09-2019 01:33 PM

Make a 10 degree block and use a hand saw to make one drawer.

Clean up with a router plane and chisel.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2763 posts in 1669 days


#2 posted 06-09-2019 01:35 PM

Since I have both a router and TS, I’d use the TS. Assuming the end of your drawer side is trimmed at 10 degrees, a sled that rides in the miter slot or a miter gauge would do the trick. Tilt the blade to 10 degrees, Attach a stop block to position the drawer face for the outer cut. Use a spacer against the stop (thickness of the drawer side minus the blade thickness) to position the drawer face for the inside cut. Hog out the center waste with multiple passes.

View Gary's profile

Gary

1402 posts in 4771 days


#3 posted 06-09-2019 03:42 PM

In this case, I think it’s easier and probably safer to bring the tool to the wood rather than the wood to the tool—therefore, router and 10-degree sole.

-- Gary, Florida

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5616 posts in 3690 days


#4 posted 06-10-2019 03:42 PM

I assume you want to cut a dado as shown on the left. Instead of a dado, can you do as shown on the right by replacing the dado with a cleat?

View CharlieK's profile

CharlieK

593 posts in 4240 days


#5 posted 06-10-2019 04:19 PM



I assume you want to cut a dado as shown on the left. Instead of a dado, can you do as shown on the right by replacing the dado with a cleat?

- MrRon

If MrRon and I understand you correctly then maybe you could make all the cuts on the table saw without any sleds, or jigs.


-- Adjustable Height Workbench Plans http://www.Jack-Bench.com

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3353 posts in 1021 days


#6 posted 06-10-2019 04:28 PM


Make a 10 degree block and use a hand saw to make one drawer.

Clean up with a router plane and chisel.

- waho6o9

Perzactly…..

You can watch Chris Gochnour of FWW do enough of it on this free video that it should illuminate your path. IIRC he did an 11*, but that is easy set up on your TS when you cut your billet.

Right here.

Conversely they can be set up for a TS, I think the thing is, is seeing it happen, then you can apply that to your work. FWIW I do all of these by hand. Learned them that way, and I just never saw the need to swap to power equipment. Because you are cutting them against a clamped down billet, it really isn’t fair to call it hand tool work. Kinda like hand tools on training wheels. Believe me in my learning curve, I made mistakes in everything. With these you almost have to try to mess up.

-- Think safe, be safe

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2763 posts in 1669 days


#7 posted 06-10-2019 04:28 PM

Ah yes, MrRon, picture worth 10K words.

Here is an illustration of where my mind was:

Basically you just peck out the dado with the blade tilted to 10 degrees

View wkossen's profile

wkossen

8 posts in 1292 days


#8 posted 06-10-2019 05:13 PM



I assume you want to cut a dado as shown on the left. Instead of a dado, can you do as shown on the right by replacing the dado with a cleat?

- MrRon

Thats exactly it. Left picture.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

205 posts in 174 days


#9 posted 06-10-2019 07:21 PM

As said above, tilt your table saw to 10 degrees, and make passes until you get the width you want.
Your only problem with this is it won’t leave the bottom of the dado flat (90deg). You will have to cut a 10 degree bevel on the edge of your board that will be going into the dado.
You still will have the small cuts from your teeth still being 90 deg.
(A dado blade would eliminate the kerf marks, but I understand dado is not an option)

Next best thing would be the tilt base on your router.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3661 posts in 1834 days


#10 posted 06-10-2019 10:22 PM

Cut a 10 degree wedge from a scrap board on the table saw, use double sided (carpet) tape to attach the wedge to the board you want the dado cut in and use a router to cut the dado through the wedge, preferably on a router table, remove the wedge.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5817 posts in 2168 days


#11 posted 06-11-2019 12:57 AM

Someone here in the US can start sending you “care packages” filled with stacked dado sets allowing you to become a black market distributor with a healthy mark up. Problem solved for you and many others in similar predicaments.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View BuckeyeDennis's profile

BuckeyeDennis

34 posts in 146 days


#12 posted 06-11-2019 10:24 AM

I’d do it on a router table, running the workpiece against the fence. Attach a shim strip to the table, next to the fence, with the shim thickness chosen to tilt the workpiece 10 degrees.

-- Dennis 'We are all faced with a series of great opportunities, brilliantly disguised as impossible situations.' Charles Swindoll

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5616 posts in 3690 days


#13 posted 06-11-2019 07:15 PM



Someone here in the US can start sending you “care packages” filled with stacked dado sets allowing you to become a black market distributor with a healthy mark up. Problem solved for you and many others in similar predicaments.

- bigblockyeti


European saws don’t have an arbor long enough to accept a dado set.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

205 posts in 174 days


#14 posted 06-11-2019 08:04 PM


Someone here in the US can start sending you “care packages” filled with stacked dado sets allowing you to become a black market distributor with a healthy mark up. Problem solved for you and many others in similar predicaments.

- bigblockyeti

European saws don t have an arbor long enough to accept a dado set.

- MrRon


Invention alert!
How about a dado stack that threads right onto the arbor? No need for the lock nut.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5616 posts in 3690 days


#15 posted 06-12-2019 07:22 PM


Invention alert!
How about a dado stack that threads right onto the arbor? No need for the lock nut.

- LeeRoyMan


Once the brake set, the dado set would un-screw from the arbor and go flying.

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