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How would you have 600bf of hard maple sawed at the mill?

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Forum topic by AJPeacock posted 06-06-2019 12:51 AM 1430 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AJPeacock

27 posts in 1089 days


06-06-2019 12:51 AM

I asked this question inside another thread and received a couple responses, I thought I might get some additional input by asking it in its own post.

I have some Maple logs that will be dropped off at the sawmill this weekend. They have been down for a couple years and probably won’t be perfect clear hard maple, might have a little spalting based on the cut we made into one of the logs.

I will have these kiln dried. I can resaw with a band saw later if required.

The logs are from 22” – 16” diameter.

They are all long trunks and I’ll know more when we buck them down to 8+ and 10+ footers (whether any have spalting on both ends of the log …).

If any look like possible spalted maple, I was thinking about having them sawed thick enough to make table tops … ?

So how would you have 600bf of Hard maple sawed if it was yours and you were just starting an inventory of wood for general hobby usage (book cases, end tables …)?

The mill can saw with circular or bandsaw. It will cost a little more for the bandsaw, but it ends with less waste and a bit smoother cut.

I placed a couple pictures of one of the logs we opened up in the other post here.

Thanks in advance,
AJ


30 replies so far

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ibewjon

604 posts in 3188 days


#1 posted 06-06-2019 01:06 AM

Don’t cut so short. Leave some to remove checking after drying. And various thicknesses, don’t commit yourself to constantly resawing. I would go bandsaw, less marks, much more return. I had logs cut at a circle saw once, never again. Every 4th cut turnned a 4/4 into dust.

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AJPeacock

27 posts in 1089 days


#2 posted 06-06-2019 01:24 AM


Don t cut so short. Leave some to remove checking after drying. And various thicknesses, don t commit yourself to constantly resawing. I would go bandsaw, less marks, much more return. I had logs cut at a circle saw once, never again. Every 4th cut turnned a 4/4 into dust.

- ibewjon

I think we have them marked at 8’4” and 10’4” lengths. I can’t store 16’s etc.

From a BF perspective, how would you spread out the 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 8/4 … ?

The thicker the cut, the more time and $ in the kiln also. I was thinking of having the largest log cut at 8/4 and split the rest equally between 4/4 and 6/4. The largest log 10’4” long is about 20% of the total BF.

Does that seem reasonable? I’m really just shooting in the dark here.

Thanks,
AJ

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ibewjon

604 posts in 3188 days


#3 posted 06-06-2019 02:06 AM

I cut mine at 9 and 11 feet to be safe. Thicknesses depend on what you use.

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Aj2

2280 posts in 2193 days


#4 posted 06-06-2019 02:13 AM

Do all the logs have a off centered pith. If I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to use the wood for I would plainsaw though and though. 5/4 or 6/4. If you want table legs full 8/4 or better riftsawn. Should be able to get them out if the center
Good luck

-- Aj

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AJPeacock

27 posts in 1089 days


#5 posted 06-06-2019 02:13 AM



I cut mine at 9 and 11 feet to be safe. Thicknesses depend on what you use.

- ibewjon

Thank you, I’m a newbie and am just getting started. So I really have no idea what I’ll use.

AJ

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CWWoodworking

496 posts in 574 days


#6 posted 06-06-2019 02:21 AM

My supplier gave me 14 footers one time. I really enjoyed using them. Seem to be more straight than 8’. nice to put it up on the chop saw station, and not have to get another board for awhile.

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AJPeacock

27 posts in 1089 days


#7 posted 06-06-2019 02:32 AM



Do all the logs have a off centered pith. If I didn’t know for sure what I wanted to use the wood for I would plainsaw though and though. 5/4 or 6/4. If you want table legs full 8/4 or better riftsawn. Should be able to get them out if the center
Good luck

- Aj2

I don’t fully understand what you are asking? Off centered pith? We haven’t cut the logs to length yet (will do that on Saturday morning just before we load them). What decision will I make based on if the ‘pith’ is off centered or not?

So I could have the largest log rift cut 8/4 and split the rest between 5/4 and 6/4 flat cut?

Seems like that would give me a mix and options for usage moving forward.

Thanks,
AJ

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ibewjon

604 posts in 3188 days


#8 posted 06-06-2019 02:52 AM

Pith is the growing center of the log, where the rings start. Growth is not always centered around the original growth. Some trees grow more to one side than the other. A tree can grow more on the side with more light. Pith is unstable.

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ibewjon

604 posts in 3188 days


#9 posted 06-06-2019 03:05 AM

And definitely get some Anchorseal to coat the ends and a few inches up on the boards, all sides. It is waterborne wax, which is made to seal lumber. Latex paint is NOT moisture barrier. I use wood lath made from pine or cottonwood from a big box or lumberyard for stickers. Some say 1”, but these have worked for me. I probably have close to 4000 board feet of ash, oak, sycamore, aromatic cedar, hard and soft maple, and black walnut drying. All but the oak have come from within a 1/2 mile of my house. I am sure you will be happy with the end product.

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SMP

1058 posts in 301 days


#10 posted 06-06-2019 03:11 AM

I would probably have some done 16/4 to make a nice roubo bench and then the rest 6/4 and 4/4

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Aj2

2280 posts in 2193 days


#11 posted 06-06-2019 04:10 AM

AJ the link you referenced that shows one of your logs has a off centered pith. When a tree grows with off centered pith there might be stress in the wood. So don’t count on it to be furniture grade lumber.
But there’s no reason to give up still lots of use for hard maple.
Workbench is a good one.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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pintodeluxe

5936 posts in 3208 days


#12 posted 06-06-2019 04:45 AM

I would commit to a couple thicknesses and have it sawed that way. To plan on resawing later is a lot of extra work. I generally like 5/4 best, and mostly order in that thickness. However I’m mostly using maple for drawer boxes, so 4/4 is better.

I would also keep the widths in the 6-8” range. Everyone orders 12” plus wide flatsawn boards and they invariably warp. I feel like narrower boards that stay flat are more valuable.

Anchorseal or something like it is a must. I’m experimenting with Meadows 1600 on my next load of 600 b.f. of white oak. It’s a concrete sealer, but recommended as a lumber sealer as well. Apparently it’s a lot like Anchorseal in that it’s a wax emulsion, but it dries white. It’s also much less expensive. I buy it in 5 gallon buckets, and I’ll be doing some side by side comparisons against Anchorseal. Seal the whole log end if you can. Otherwise, seal the individual boards immediately after cutting.

For lengths I like anything 8-13 feet.

Good luck with it!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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AJPeacock

27 posts in 1089 days


#13 posted 06-06-2019 12:54 PM

Thanks all, I don’t think I need the anchorseal at this point, as the cut lumber is being kiln dried.

The long logs are being trimmed/cut to length and brought directly to the sawmill.

Correct?

Thanks,
AJ

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ibewjon

604 posts in 3188 days


#14 posted 06-06-2019 01:26 PM

I have never done kiln drying. Check with the mill. See how long it will be stacked before going to the kiln.

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PPK

1412 posts in 1204 days


#15 posted 06-06-2019 02:22 PM

I personally find that true random-width/random-length lumber yields the least waste on any project. I agree with those that said that the really wide boards aren’t all that great; they tend to cup and you aren’t really gaining anything after you have to cut them up.

Depending on your usage, I find it really nice to have some 6/4 lumber. Otherwise, I predominantly use 5/4 and 4/4.

Good luck with it all, and have fun!

-- Pete

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