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Cutting a perfect slot oak floor between two posts

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Forum topic by Noobiewoodcanoobi posted 05-29-2019 01:55 PM 547 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Noobiewoodcanoobi

4 posts in 48 days


05-29-2019 01:55 PM

I have a seem between joining hardwood floor sections. It looks like an eye sore because the grains obviously don’t continue and differ.

I thought of routing out a slot at the seem and putting in a piece of oak running perpendicular to the existing boards making a transition border. However, the seem is between two posts and a router will only go so far before hitting a post.

What can I do? I don’t want to refinish or rip anything up. Thanks


12 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

1415 posts in 3265 days


#1 posted 05-29-2019 02:35 PM

Sounds like an Oscillating tool is needed, they can get into the corners, the Ridgid one at HD is a good price I don’t use mine often but when it’s needed it’s very handy, be sure you have hearing protection.

You don’t say which type of flooring it is, keep in mind that depending on the width of the slot for the transition strip, a router will reduce the wood to sawdust and make a huge mess. Personally I’d use the circular saw, set for depth, using a straight edge and then finish the cuts to the wall with the oscillating tool.

Last option if you don’t want to get the new tool, is old school, hammer and chisel to the wall.

Good luck.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Noobiewoodcanoobi

4 posts in 48 days


#2 posted 05-30-2019 05:59 AM

Hi

Thanks for the reply. It’s oak, 2.25×0.75
I have a worm drive circular and can use that, just have to place a guide down for the fence. Regarding the oscillating tool, never used one, how can I ensure it cuts straight? The objective is to slide a oak floor plank in the slot, perpendicular to the direction the two floors meet and seem
Hope this makes sense. Thanks

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CaptainKlutz

1487 posts in 1910 days


#3 posted 05-30-2019 09:51 AM

Typically when transitioning between two rooms with different hardwood floors, you install a perpendicular T-Molding that is slightly raised, just like a threshold at door. The transition piece has overhang (or a groove undercut), so that edges overlap the ends of boards to deal with wood movement while hiding any gaps.
They look like this:
https://www.lumberliquidators.com/ll/s/T+Molding

If you don’t want to have the ~1/4 raised lip like on commercially sold T-Molding transition, can treat it like a half lap joint and cut grooves in floor, with custom cap piece. If you place a decorative 1/8” bead on the edges of wide transition piece, if will hide any slight gap during environmental changes after install.

PS – have installed 3 hardwood floors in my life, and certainly not an expert. Just sharing what I used in past.

Best Luck!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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ChefHDAN

1415 posts in 3265 days


#4 posted 05-30-2019 11:11 AM



Hi
how can I ensure it cuts straight?
- Noobiewoodcanoobi

You can also use a straightedge for the cuts, use at least a 3/4” tall one, and align the blade against the guard with slight pressure as you start the cut.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Lazyman

3515 posts in 1803 days


#5 posted 05-30-2019 11:43 AM

When you say posts, are these for a doorway or out in the middle of a room? If not a doorway, I am just wondering if you are substituting an eye sore for an oddity? Just a thought. If it is a doorway, something a little wider may do a better job of separating the offending offset pieces. You might even make it as wide as the door frame sort of like a flush threshold. Also, if you have to worry about nails or concrete underneath, a router or circular saw may not be the best choice.

A couple of other ideas for cutting near the posts:
  • Use some carpet tape (double sided tape) to attach guides to the floor. This should help you keep the oscillating saw from straying outside the lines. You will need that for router or circular saws as well.
  • You might be able to handle most of the last bit using a back saw or sash saw. Tape a board down as a guide to to get it started at least You still may have to finish up the last little bit with a oscillating saw or a chisel.
  • I’ve never used one but the Dremel Saw Max is a small circular saw that may be easier to use than the router or the full size saw and it may get you closer to the post before you have to switch over to the oscillating saw and chisel. If there are nails or concrete underneath, this may be a better option for the bulk of the cutting than router and full size circular saw. I think that they have blades that can handle both. The oscillating saw can handle nails too and the concrete won’t be a problem either. You may be able to find a used one on Craigslist or Facebook marketplace. RotoZip has a similar small circular saw attachment.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Noobiewoodcanoobi

4 posts in 48 days


#6 posted 05-30-2019 05:36 PM

Attached an image for clarity
The posts are not between doors, just posts between two rooms. You can see part of one in the pic

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2213 days


#7 posted 05-30-2019 06:07 PM

Here’s what I would do. Scribe around the piece of wood that your going to use .
Remove everything in the way with a backsaw and chisels.
No power tools needed.
One more thing put some good music on. I recommend a cd the highway men. Or just Willie Nelson
Good Luck

-- Aj

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SMP

1155 posts in 321 days


#8 posted 05-30-2019 07:16 PM

Is that floor already completely down and installed? It really should be done right if not.

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Noobiewoodcanoobi

4 posts in 48 days


#9 posted 05-30-2019 08:48 PM

What do u mean down and installed? Clearly it’s installed and on the floor.

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Nubsnstubs

1577 posts in 2146 days


#10 posted 05-30-2019 11:58 PM



What do u mean down and installed? Clearly it s installed and on the floor.

- Noobiewoodcanoobi

Thanks, Noobiewoodcanoobi, I needed a laugh. What you could do is route it, like you stated in the first post. When you hit the post, you would more than likely have about a 2” space of uncut wood on each end. Grab a hammer/mallet and chisel, and finish the job. After chiseling out the wood, get some TEE molding like Klutz linked to, or make your own…..... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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BuckeyeDennis

23 posts in 114 days


#11 posted 05-31-2019 02:03 AM

Assuming that your floor is nailed-down tongue and groove, keep in mind that you may hit flooring nails if you cut the ends of the boards completely away, to make room for a full-size flooring piece. That’s less likely if you only through-cut a slot wide enough for the “spine” of a T-molding. I’m thinking that the flooring boards would be too prone to splitting to be nailed that close to their ends.

However, flooring nails have to be recessed at least to the tops of the tongues, probably about 1/4” down. So if you want the new piece to be flush, you could power-route away maybe 3/16” from the top of the existing flooring, except right against the posts. A chisel and router plane (with the blade reversed) could clean out that part easily enough.

Then you could make a custom-fitted flush-mount T-molding from a regular piece of flooring, by cutting off the tongue side to width, and milling rabbets on each bottom edge.

The hard part of flush mounting, regardless of whether it’s a T-molding or not, would be getting nice straight parallel cuts in the end grain of the existing flooring. Any imperfections will show up in the seams.

But personally, I don’t think that the existing seam looks all that bad.

-- Dennis 'We are all faced with a series of great opportunities, brilliantly disguised as impossible situations.' Charles Swindoll

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SMP

1155 posts in 321 days


#12 posted 05-31-2019 05:10 AM



What do u mean down and installed? Clearly it s installed and on the floor.

- Noobiewoodcanoobi

Clearly its on the floor, but not clear if its already nailed or glued down smartarse. Thought (hoping) maybe someone was doing a dry fit.

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