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Used cabinet saw vs new grizzly

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Forum topic by cimarron posted 05-28-2019 01:33 AM 1349 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cimarron

11 posts in 1525 days


05-28-2019 01:33 AM

Hello, I’ve only posted maybe once or twice on this forum (or anywhere for that matter) but I continually find myself browsing these forums to see what everybodies opinions are on certain tools and techniques. Just wanted to say thanks to everybody that I’ve read over the years.

I’m in the market for a 220 cabinet saw with a mobile base below 2k. It will go in a new shop and my uncle is a “lecturshan,” so whatever power it needs, it will get. The reason for this purchase is sweat equity. The new house me and the wife are buying will need new kitchen and new bathroom vanities, plus new cased openings and window boxes and casings. Plus, new custom paint grade base in the “country chic” style. Pinterest will be the death of me. I currently own a ts3650 and although its, I feel, a great saw, (will keep it, because i couldnt take letting her go) the abysmal dust collection and ok fence aren’t gonna do it for me anymore. I want a machine that I know I can dial in and let it eat all night. This either puts me in the used market or the grizzly market.

I work as a carpenter for a residential home building company. We do it all from the foundation to the shingles and from shim to trim, and I have never once used a saw with a riving knife or blade guard. A co-worker has a 5 hp sawstop and he cant even find the riving knife. That’s a nice saw, but I can’t afford it. I know the safety guys are going to give me a lecture. I do use a push stick if anybody wants to know.

Are new saws with riving knives that much of a difference? I ask, because there is a left tilt PM 66 three hours away for 800 bucks. I have “restored” all the tools in my shop, so an old piece of equipment doesn’t bother me. I also dont live anywhere near a woodworking showroom to go fondle the new models. Unisaws pop up from time to time as well. Do you think it would be worth purchasing a new saw with a riving knife or go for an older piece of machinery with a quality fence system? The used prices compared to a new grizzly is a difference of about 1k in my area. Please, I do not want a 120v saw.


36 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8409 posts in 4382 days


#1 posted 05-28-2019 01:46 AM

I happen to think a good riving knife is a better mousetrap than a good splitter, but I still see both as a mousetrap that performs a similar function, and would not let that option stop me from buying a great saw at a great price.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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MrUnix

8408 posts in 3206 days


#2 posted 05-28-2019 01:49 AM

Do you think it would be worth purchasing a new saw with a riving knife or go for an older piece of machinery with a quality fence system?
- cimarron

Everyone will have different criteria as to what they want or need in a saw. As for the above question, I certainly know which way I went – a pseudo-vintage yet now better than new Unisaw that set me back roughly $250.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

445 posts in 966 days


#3 posted 05-28-2019 01:50 AM

Id get a used saw… i see no reason to buy new unless you just want a new saw. Used cabinet saws are common enough.

I actually just bought another one this weekend, a 1998 pm 66 with attached 3 roll power feeder for $600 total.

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John Jardin

94 posts in 647 days


#4 posted 05-28-2019 02:12 AM

A cabinet saw is your best bet because you can accurately align the blade with the miter slot. I have a Delta Unisaw, a Grizzly Drum Sander and a Grizzly 5hp dust collector.
I mention Grizzly only because in the past I associated Grizzly with Harbor Freight…but not any longer!
The used Grizzly drum sander that I bought needed major rebuilding and thanks to the outstanding tech and customer service, I now wonder how I ever got along without it. The 5hp Grizzly dust connector is an outstanding machine of high quality.
I’m not promoting Grizzly just saying that your choice of either a good used machine or new Grizzly would be equal.
As a carpenter, and not a novice, your decision to go with a cabinet saw will serve you well with all of the projects you (and your wife) are planning.

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cimarron

11 posts in 1525 days


#5 posted 05-28-2019 02:19 AM

Thanks for the replies so fast. Are there any serious internal issues that might cost me down the road with used unisaws or pms? I guess another way to ask is if the bearings go, will I be down weeks while I track down replacement parts, or is there enough of a market to support used saw buyers? I ran into this with my 3650. I have the “dado groove arbor” and havent been able to justify spending more time and effort than the saw’s worth.

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cimarron

11 posts in 1525 days


#6 posted 05-28-2019 02:22 AM

Oh, and zoro39, if you did it again, would you purchase the unisaw again?

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

445 posts in 966 days


#7 posted 05-28-2019 02:30 AM



Thanks for the replies so fast. Are there any serious internal issues that might cost me down the road with used unisaws or pms? I guess another way to ask is if the bearings go, will I be down weeks while I track down replacement parts, or is there enough of a market to support used saw buyers? I ran into this with my 3650. I have the “dado groove arbor” and havent been able to justify spending more time and effort than the saw s worth.

- cimarron

Bearings are std off the shelf parts at a bearing house. There isn’t much to go wrong on a saw besides bearings and belts.

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MrUnix

8408 posts in 3206 days


#8 posted 05-28-2019 02:37 AM

Are there any serious internal issues that might cost me down the road with used unisaws or pms?
- cimarron

No, not usually. They were built like tanks, and most ‘consumables’ are off the shelf parts, like bearings and belts. The Unisaw has a slight advantage, as it was in continuous production from the late 30’s up until its redesign around 2007 – and it remained virtually the same throughout that production run. With its long production run, there are tons of them out there and generally the parts are interchangeable between years. You can use parts from a 1950 Unisaw on a 2003 machine and visa-versa, with only some minor restrictions. The PM66 also had a very long production run, however several key aspects were changed over the years, so sourcing parts is a bit more difficult but not impossible. The Unisaw is typically the standard by which all others are judged, but either one will be a lifetime saw.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4135 posts in 2501 days


#9 posted 05-28-2019 10:43 AM

Your profile doesn’t show where you are located?
There was a LJ member in San Antonio, TX asking about what price to set for selling a Unisaw yesterday. :-)

+1 Used cabinet saws are pretty durable.

New arbor and motor bearings, plus new belts take less than $100 and 1 day to change. Spend more time tuning the saw upon reassembly, then changing the parts!

Electric motor starters can get flaky after 10-15 years, but Grizzly will sell you replacement for < $100. China will sell you same model direct via flea-bay or Ama-dud for $40. Original US branded Allen Brady or Funas starters used on USA made saws will run almost $200 if you want keep older saw original.

In used market, decide if you want right or left tilt blade. Only Powermatic and newer Unisaw are left tilt, which narrows used market offerings, if that is priority.

Can upgrade Unisaw with an OEM ‘disappearing splitter’ for $90 to take place of riving knife. Not same, but close. They were used on commercial saws with overhead blade guards and dust collection, and are still available. The Shark guard is still available, it offers a riving knife/dust collection blade guard replacement.

If you like refurbishing older tools, there can be some decent bargains on cabinet saws. Rusty, crusty tools that just need TLC and new wear parts sell for couple hundred dollars if your fast enough. Details

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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cimarron

11 posts in 1525 days


#10 posted 05-28-2019 01:03 PM

Ill update my page some day, Im in the four corners area. Not opposed to drivin, but San Antonio would kill my budget :)

View Denner's profile

Denner

13 posts in 648 days


#11 posted 05-28-2019 01:49 PM

The Shark Guard folks make a riving knife mount you can retrofit to a unisaw, though you do need to manually adjust the height of the splitter, and you can get it with a couple different knife thicknesses, depending on the blade(s) you use.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1536 posts in 3768 days


#12 posted 05-28-2019 02:11 PM

Save the money and get a great used light industrial grade table saw. Most of my shop machines are old industrial machines from WW-2 to about 1975 and all are refurbished to like new condition and kept that way. A thought: as you have an electrician in the family, it opens you up to considering a 3-phase 220V saw. You will need to purchase a phase converter. Consider setting the phase converter up on a separate shop electrical circuit rather than just connecting it to a single machine. With this special circuit you can add other 220V 3-phase based light industrial machines to the shop using only one phase converter. Your electrician relative will know all about this. Note that used 220V 3 phase machines usually go for cheaper money as there are fewer potential buyers.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View sgcz75b's profile

sgcz75b

72 posts in 767 days


#13 posted 05-28-2019 03:42 PM

If you have the money, go for a new Grizzly cabinet table saw. You’ve obviously need a new saw to begin the work you mentioned. Beware of false economy with a used saw, particularly a 3-phase one.

Grizzly has great value and customer service. Remember, no one here is going to warranty your used saw.

Spend the money, get a new Grizzly, and begin your work. You’ll be ahead of the game.

-- "A dying people tolerates the present, rejects the future, and finds its satisfactions in past greatness and half remembered glory" - John Steinbeck

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

8408 posts in 3206 days


#14 posted 05-28-2019 03:56 PM

Beware of false economy with a used saw, particularly a 3-phase one.
- sgcz75b

Huh? Please, do explain that one!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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sgcz75b

72 posts in 767 days


#15 posted 05-28-2019 04:59 PM


Beware of false economy with a used saw, particularly a 3-phase one.
- sgcz75b

Huh? Please, do explain that one!

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

My above comments are self-explanatory. The OP can decide if they’re relevant to him.

-- "A dying people tolerates the present, rejects the future, and finds its satisfactions in past greatness and half remembered glory" - John Steinbeck

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