LumberJocks

Veritas Hand Plane ruined by embedded screw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by anthm27 posted 05-26-2019 12:24 AM 856 views 1 time favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View anthm27's profile

anthm27

864 posts in 1505 days


05-26-2019 12:24 AM

I,ve been in denial that I ruined my beautiful Veritas Smoothing plane all on my own.

A few days ago using it to clean up a router sled that I,d made, I hit a buried screw on two passes.
Horrendous, I quickly put the Plane back on the shelf and went into denial that it actually happened.

Unfortunately this morning I had to face reality, I had a close look, I realized the truth, The thing has two gouges down the sole and two gouges out of the hardened PM-V11 blade. All my own stupid fault. Honestly, I,m feeling sick over it.

What should I do?


22 replies so far

View SMP's profile

SMP

1058 posts in 300 days


#1 posted 05-26-2019 12:30 AM

Ouch. Well the iron could use a regrind if you have a slow speed grinder? Or just go through the stones starting coarse.

For the sole I isually just tape some sandpaper to my tablesaw and run it back and forth till smoothed out a bit. I usually start at 100 then 150 or 220, then 400 or so wet dry. No need to get the groove completely out, just want to knock down any burs.

View Cold_Pizza's profile

Cold_Pizza

22 posts in 146 days


#2 posted 05-26-2019 12:30 AM

now you have the opportunity to throw a fresh bevel on the blade and make sure that sole is flat.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6211 posts in 2606 days


#3 posted 05-26-2019 12:32 AM

Grind the blade back past the nick, resharpen, make sure there is no burr on the gouge in the sole and put it back to work.

The plane is not ruined, it just has a new “character mark”. The only concern for for future planing would be if the the gouge has a sharp edge. If so, a few passes on some 220 grit sandpaper will take care of it.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View Kent's profile (online now)

Kent

207 posts in 2191 days


#4 posted 05-26-2019 12:40 AM


Ouch. Well the iron could use a regrind if you have a slow speed grinder? Or just go through the stones starting coarse.

For the sole I isually just tape some sandpaper to my tablesaw and run it back and forth till smoothed out a bit. I usually start at 100 then 150 or 220, then 400 or so wet dry. No need to get the groove completely out, just want to knock down any burs.

- SMP

+1. Hitting embedded metal is not something that you really want to make a habit of, but it’s not the end of the tool. Hit the sole with just enough sandpaper to remove any jagged edges from the wound and regrind and sharpen the blade.

A quick browse through some of the handtool threads here (“Show the restoration before and after” and “Handplanes Of Your Dreams, v2.0 – Sharp As Ever”) will show you that these tools can still do a wonderful job even after taking some abuses. Take the lesson and stop kicking yourself.

-- If I knew then what I know now, I'd have made a completely different set of mistakes.

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

25326 posts in 4246 days


#5 posted 05-26-2019 12:44 AM

Anthony, I would say a lot of careful grinding on a white stone wheel or equivalent and keep the heat factor to a minimum, then much honing or buy a new blade.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6158 posts in 2599 days


#6 posted 05-26-2019 12:44 AM

OK the reality is as below:-

First up you need to give yourself an upper cut if you havent already done so, then after that the following may help.

1. You need to accept the fact that you have screwed up big time are going to have to attend intensive counselling, ... possibly at least a pack of six sessions, may be even more depending on results.
2. Upon recovery just but a new plane problem solved, a bit like smashing your car!

3. However if you can live with the emotional scars, you could conduct some in house surgery.
get some wet and dry and remove the raised sections of the gouge and then smooth out the now sharp edges. It will be as good a s new as long as you dont look underneath.

Other options: have the plane surface ground to remove all the damage sign.

Conclusion:- Consider yourself very lucky not to have damaged the plane blade more than shown.

Other purchases:- next glue run buy a metal detector as if you work with recycled timber its a must.

Otherwise dont be too dissapointed,... everybody does it sometime… hence my CMT router bit!

-- Regards Rob

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

423 posts in 1080 days


#7 posted 05-26-2019 01:01 AM

Yup it’s ruined – better send it my way for proper disposal

In all seriousness, this is a bummer but, as others have noted, some sandpaper and a regrind will have you good as new

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

864 posts in 1505 days


#8 posted 05-26-2019 01:51 AM

Thanks for the inputs, and yes I am felling a little better about the whole thing. Sharpening or should I say grinding blades has never been my forte though, I,m ok with honing on a stone and polishing to get the final sharp edge but getting the angle right on a wheel has never been my thing. U,m I,ll definitely be researching and may lash out for some sort of grinding type system.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1058 posts in 300 days


#9 posted 05-26-2019 02:23 AM



Thanks for the inputs, and yes I am felling a little better about the whole thing. Sharpening or should I say grinding blades has never been my forte though, I,m ok with honing on a stone and polishing to get the final sharp edge but getting the angle right on a wheel has never been my thing. U,m I,ll definitely be researching and may lash out for some sort of grinding type system.

- anthm27

Whats the coarsest stone you have? I just reground an iron from my #4 with a 250 wetstone(inexpensive Norton double side 250 & 1000)Took maybe 10 minutes, then just a couple minutes to hone and strop.

If anyone asks, just say your plane is “corrugated” like some of Stanleys ;)

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

450 posts in 4363 days


#10 posted 05-26-2019 02:26 AM

Hi Anthony

If it makes you feel better (possibly not!), this is a common occurrence. It is not just imbedded screws or nails that can damage (use a metal detector when working reclaimed wood), but also imbedded grit. The soles of planes, when used regularly, become scratched. This is life. Only shelf queens do not.

Since the scratch is at the back of the mouth, I would just ignore it. Keep in mind that the Veritas plane soles are flatter than you could ever achieve in your shop, so leave alone until it is necessary.

As for the blade, if you plan to use hand tools, you need to invest in a way to grind them back since nicks are ultra common. There are many choices here, ranging from machines (rotary and flat, CBN to belts) to stones (water- and diamond) and sandpaper on glass (cheapest).

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2280 posts in 2193 days


#11 posted 05-26-2019 02:47 AM

I’m going to agree with Derek. Just the blade needs attention leave the sole alone.
I do know how you feel I have a LN fore plane with a gouge full length of the sole. The gouge hasn’t affect the way it cuts. I can’t imagine your plane will work any different.

Good Luck

-- Aj

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

864 posts in 1505 days


#12 posted 05-27-2019 02:36 AM

wow , just looking at grinding systems, those Tormeks are certainly not cheap.
They look good though.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1385 posts in 1889 days


#13 posted 05-27-2019 11:10 AM

+1 grind the blade, leave the sole alone unless there is sharp edge.

My normal punishment for forgetting to check for hidden staple before planing wood is to force myself to remove the nick with 120 and 240 grit water stones by hand. The large grit makes this awful scratching noise that seems like I am killing the blade. Can often hear poor thing screaming at me the entire time. :-)
The wasted time and punishing noises remind me that I did something bad, and don’t want to do it again.
LOL

Sure, I can fire up the 8” grinder with 3M blue/white cool grind wheels, and do it faster; but sometimes self flagellation is warranted for not paying attention to details of craftsmanship.

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Andre's profile

Andre

2626 posts in 2201 days


#14 posted 05-28-2019 01:48 PM

That little nick could be removed in about 15 min. on a good 1000 Water stone IMHO. In my case then would have to re grind the hollow grind (I use a hand powered 6” wheel grinder with a white stone) then put a new edge on the 8000 stone, as for the base of the plane a few strokes on some 220 grit sand paper(I use self adhesive rolls from a auto body supple store) to flatten and because it is a Veritas there should be no hollows!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Markmh1's profile

Markmh1

105 posts in 838 days


#15 posted 05-29-2019 12:52 PM

Veritas has a pretty good plane, I would think the sole is flat. I’d just flat-stone over the gouges to remove
any burrs. The gouges are recessed into the sole so they will not leave any traces on your work providing
there are no burrs left standing.

The blade, well, that’s gonna take either stoning or power equipment to get that back to like new. But you
knew that.

This sort of thing is going to happen. Marks on tools from use is part of the job. If every tool you owned
remained pristine, you probably wouldn’t be using them.

Mark

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com