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Sawstop JSS - wasting my time?

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Forum topic by Noel posted 05-25-2019 12:44 PM 523 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Noel

77 posts in 201 days


05-25-2019 12:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sawstop jss

I have had a Sawstop JSS for about two and a half years. It has been a good saw to learn on and I don’t regret the purchase, but I am beginning to see its shortcomings. I can’t seem to get a perfectly square cross cut, despite using a crosscut sled and/or an Incra 1000 miter gauge. The one thing I haven’t done yet is to buy a good dial indicator to check slot-to-blade, slot-to-fence and blade-to-fence parallel. I know that the fence can be adjusted but I’m not sure the blade can be. Am I wasting time and money thinking I can calibrate this type of saw to do precision work? My shop is 150 SF, and a larger, cabinet or even contractor style Sawstop TS would be a stretch – fit-wise and budget-wise. I have had a close call on a friend’s DeWalt (completely my fault), so I will only consider a Sawstop TS. Anyone else trying to get just a little more out of a jobsite saw? Fool’s errand?

-- Just make the cut


11 replies so far

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3692 days


#1 posted 05-25-2019 12:50 PM

You can absolutely calibrate the saw for precision work, and you can absolutely adjust the alignment of the blade with the table.

View sgcz75b's profile

sgcz75b

66 posts in 154 days


#2 posted 05-25-2019 02:39 PM

Until you’ve done the necessary steps to adjust your table saw, which should be done on a regular basis, you can’t fault the saw.

Watch this, do the steps she advises, then you might find your saw works as it should.

http://bit.ly/2QnK0HN

-- "A dying people tolerates the present, rejects the future, and finds its satisfactions in past greatness and half remembered glory" - John Steinbeck

View Noel's profile

Noel

77 posts in 201 days


#3 posted 05-25-2019 11:19 PM

Thank you both. I did a little searching and, as Jonah says, there are indeed adjustments for the blade. I will also check out the video – that’s exactly what I need – I’m a visual kind of guy.

-- Just make the cut

View RickKr's profile

RickKr

18 posts in 165 days


#4 posted 05-26-2019 02:47 AM

I did the alignment adjustments when I first started using my Sawstop JSS. I was extremely frustrated by the way the blade alignment is adjusted. The Allen (hex) key head that adjusts the arbor alignment is located down, about even with the arbor. The blade is too close to the socket head to get an unmodified hex key into the head. The blade has to be loosened from the arbor and moved over to get the hex key in the head to make the adjustment. What a dumb design, to have to dismount the blade every time you put the key in to adjust the arbor. I got it done, but it was a PITA.

Then, someone posted on the Sawstop Facebook Group, in response to my whining, a superior method (starting at 9:10 into the video) for aligning the blade/arbor. Remove the blade and mount in its place a reference board. In the YT video link provided, the guy uses a 1×2 board. I think I’ll find something more of the metal sort, but he makes a good point that the board doesn’t even have to be straight, as long as you measure with the dial indicator in the exact same spot on the board. To adjust the blade/arbor, measure a point on the board with the board rotated as far as it will go in one direction. Then rotate the board as far as it will go in the other direction and measure. With the blade gone there is plenty of room to get the hex key in there and make the adjustment. The other great thing is that with the indicator in place, you can see how much you have moved the board, so it gives you some reference for how far to go. With the first method above, with the blade on the arbor but loose, you cannot see how much you have moved the arbor.

I haven’t actually done this myself yet, but I am confident it will work much better than the “stock” method.

BTW, I love the JSS, for what it is and my situation, of not having space for a cabinet saw.

Rick

-- If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

View Noel's profile

Noel

77 posts in 201 days


#5 posted 05-26-2019 12:05 PM

Sawstop Facebook Group? Superior method for adjusting the arbor? Where have I been? Thanks for the GREAT video link, Rick. This is exactly what I needed. I might just make the trek over to my local Woodcraft today to see if they have a decent dial indicator. And I agree – some sort of metal bar material would be nice to use and there might even be a way to store it on board. Feeling a little better about my saw’s potential now.

-- Just make the cut

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Noel

77 posts in 201 days


#6 posted 05-26-2019 12:09 PM

P.S., Rick – the Newbie Woodworker that made the Sawstop JSS arbor adjustment video just got a PCS. ;)

-- Just make the cut

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1401 posts in 3243 days


#7 posted 05-26-2019 12:11 PM



......to see if they have a decent dial indicator.
- Noel

While it’s not an inexpensive instrument, the Woodpecker Saw Gauge has been one of my favorite purchases, it’s quick and fast to pull off the shelf and check settings. I used many of the other methods and I picked it up when I saw it on sale and have never regretted it. WP has recently put out a Saw Gauge 2.0 so you may find some sellers with this version on sale.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View RickKr's profile

RickKr

18 posts in 165 days


#8 posted 05-26-2019 04:47 PM


Sawstop Facebook Group? ...snip… Feeling a little better about my saw s potential now.

- Noel

Should be easy to find the FB group, but here is a link

Yes, the Newbie Woodworker did get a PCS. I think it was not because he didn’t like the JSS. I think it is like why dogs lick their b*&#’s – because he could – 1) fit it into his shop and 2) he could afford it.

......to see if they have a decent dial indicator.
- Noel

While it s not an inexpensive instrument, the Woodpecker Saw Gauge has been one of my favorite purchases, it s quick and fast to pull off the shelf and check settings. I used many of the other methods and I picked it up when I saw it on sale and have never regretted it. WP has recently put out a Saw Gauge 2.0 so you may find some sellers with this version on sale.

- ChefHDAN

Nice looking tool. It looks to be extremely useful/valuable. If I were not a machinist first, I would definitely buy something like that. Rather, I have several indicators, so I will likely make one… someday… For a little while, I have a couple of “Spring” related priorities – setting up the above ground swimming pool for my granddaughter and setting up the drip irrigation system for my garden. The pool itself is easy, it is the sand filter and saltwater chlorine injector systems that are the most time consuming.

Rick

-- If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

View sgcz75b's profile

sgcz75b

66 posts in 154 days


#9 posted 05-26-2019 05:06 PM

Not to throw hot water on the Woodpecker gauge, but there are reviews that are less than stellar due to several factors. Before spending your money, check other gauges.

Frankly, a homemade gauge is just as reliable and far less expensive.

Glad you’re setting up your saw for best results.

-- "A dying people tolerates the present, rejects the future, and finds its satisfactions in past greatness and half remembered glory" - John Steinbeck

View RickKr's profile

RickKr

18 posts in 165 days


#10 posted 05-26-2019 06:05 PM


Not to throw hot water on the Woodpecker gauge, but there are reviews that are less than stellar due to several factors. Before spending your money, check other gauges.

Always a good idea to check out things before throwing down your money. Thanks. I would be interested in seeing those reviews.


Frankly, a homemade gauge is just as reliable and far less expensive.

I am thinking of making something more like the device in this YT video. I have already made a miter slot sliding bar with adjustment screws for dialing in the fit in the slot. The rest is easy peasy. I will NOT bother with the elevation screws. Those seem totally superfluous as the miter bar will rise to mate with the indicator bar and thus will “float” vertically in the slot just by being screwed to the indicator bar.

The same effect can be had simply by pressing the assembly firmly in the miter slot towards the blade/fence when making the measurements. Done consistently, it is effective. No real need for the screws for snugging the miter bar in the slot, although I have done that for my Incra 1000SE miter guage as I don’t want to have to bother with ensuring that lateral pressure when making cuts.


Glad you re setting up your saw for best results.

- sgcz75b

I am thrilled that we have found a better way to make these adjustments on the JSS.

Rick

-- If you want nice clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes at a lower price.

View Noel's profile

Noel

77 posts in 201 days


#11 posted 05-27-2019 02:00 PM

It seems, with the help of this community, that I have found the answer to my original conundrum: it is definitely NOT a waste of time to do the calibration necessary to get the most I possibly can out of my Sawstop JSS saw. Thanks all for your comments, suggestions and links to other resources on this topic. Now to decide on the right measuring solution! It never ends, thank goodness.

-- Just make the cut

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