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Sanding Etc. and Arthritis

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Forum topic by Mike Turner posted 05-25-2019 08:26 AM 441 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mike Turner

58 posts in 2545 days


05-25-2019 08:26 AM

I am a woodturner.I make flutes and bowls…Ive done it a while…more or less self taught except for the ?s Ive asked everybody.

Anyhow I have some arthritis in my hands…Dr. says he is pretty sure it is the osteoarthritis or the kind from overuse. It doesnt look like the rheumatoid kind to him…

Anyhow the arthritis bothers me some and I want to keep doing as much as I can. Sanding the flutes and bowls bother me. I use a “Sanding Wonder” and it is great but I was thinking about power sanding.I have plenty of 2” ,3” and even 5” hook and loop pads that I got from Vinces WoodsNWonders. I want a good right angle or close quarter one. I have heard a drill doesnt last very long sanding and even if you have something that is a sander you have to blow it out .Anyhow I am very open to suggestions. Thanks a bunch!

-- Mike,North Carolina


15 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2652 posts in 2524 days


#1 posted 05-25-2019 09:28 AM

Have a small compressor so use air sander with think 2 3/8” disk from Vince!

-- Bill

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2303 posts in 2379 days


#2 posted 05-25-2019 12:15 PM

I use a Neiko close quarters drill, about $40 on amazon. I use 2” mandrels and interface pads with 2-3/8” discs from Vince’s. Yes the drills load up with dust. I tape a piece of 1/2” thick ac filter material over the intake vents and blow it out often. I actually have 3 of the drills now, and keep bearing replacements around. When a new one gets tight I tear it done, clean out the oem grease, replace bearings usually, and coat the gears with lots of paste wax which doesnt build up with dust. More expensive drills will end up with the same problems. I think an air sander would be better with respect to dust inside, just a question of whether you have a compressor that can run one, and speed control of the drill can be a bit more difficult but can do it by regulating air pressure vs only the trigger. You definitely need dust collection for power sanding.

View Nubsnstubs's profile (online now)

Nubsnstubs

1566 posts in 2119 days


#3 posted 05-25-2019 01:00 PM

Mike, I’ve been using this 2001. It is a drill, but with a collet attachment that can be gotten easily, it can be used as a sander. It is used mostly in the aviation industry. I also just about had a heart attack when I saw the price. I know I didn’t pay that when I got it. I use it to do all inside sanding using different accessories that what is sold with it at this location. It’s ideal for hollow forms with small openings as I have rollock discs from 1” to 3”.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200451730_200451730

This drill below seems to be within the budget of most folks. A small compressor that puts out 3-4 CFM would keep these going. This one wouldn’t need the collet required for the above tool. This tool would require a larger opening pieces because of the chuck.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200658757_200658757 ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Bmezz

50 posts in 1772 days


#4 posted 05-25-2019 01:30 PM

I bought this one ar the Saratoga symposium. I was impressed with the construction, no plastic gears. So far, so good. Any drill used for sanding should be blown out regularly.

https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/unique-tools/products/angle-drill

-- Member Valley Woodturners Ottawa. Member AAW

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2303 posts in 2379 days


#5 posted 05-25-2019 02:54 PM

Link to the Neiko drill here

One point not mentioned – angle of the drill. The 55 deg or so angles are better for more open forms like bowls, platters, etc. Will use a shorter mandrel to keep the drill body out of the way. A true 90 deg angle doesnt work as well IMO. I dont use power sanding inside of hollow forms so cant comment for that application.

HF also has electric and air angled drills.

View Mike Turner's profile

Mike Turner

58 posts in 2545 days


#6 posted 06-02-2019 02:58 PM



I bought this one ar the Saratoga symposium. I was impressed with the construction, no plastic gears. So far, so good. Any drill used for sanding should be blown out regularly.

https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/unique-tools/products/angle-drill

- Bmezz


I just received this one.It looks just the Neiko one except the color and this one is supposed to have metal gears.Hope it last…Havent used it yet but will soon…The Neiko reviews are not good.!

-- Mike,North Carolina

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2303 posts in 2379 days


#7 posted 06-03-2019 12:12 AM

My Neiko drills have metal gears. Most of the negative reviews were people using it for fairly heavy drilling. Lot of difference between drilling holes and sanding. Only issues have been brgs due to wood dust and wore out the brushes, replaceable, in one.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1328 posts in 2425 days


#8 posted 06-03-2019 11:04 AM

I think I bought a right angle drill from Harbor Freight for about $35. Still using it years later.
I have a friend who went through two Milwaukee RA drills at $150 each before he went the same route. He figures if he wears it out, he can just buy another.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

View Greg66's profile

Greg66

30 posts in 47 days


#9 posted 06-03-2019 11:13 AM

I have a Makita 3/8” right angle drill that I bought in 1995 and it’s sanded over 10,000 spindles and about 7000 bowls. It still works great. They are a bit pricy but considering the lifespan it’s a bargain.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2850 posts in 3921 days


#10 posted 06-03-2019 12:58 PM

I get drills at yard sales, $3 – $5. Sometimes it’s easier to change drills rather than bits or whatever else. If they crap out I’m not losing much.

I stay away from using air tools at the lathe, oil is in the exhaust.

The right angle drills I’ve seen are always heavier than a regular drill.

-- My reality check bounced...

View sgcz75b's profile

sgcz75b

60 posts in 150 days


#11 posted 06-03-2019 03:09 PM

Keep your eyes out for a used Foredom flexible shaft outfit. I bought one 15 years ago and it’s indispensable around the shop. It was several hundred dollars but has paid for itself many times. You can sand, cut, shape, carve in wood, metal, and plastics and do everything and more than a Dremel or other less powerful tool. It will fit into places a regular drill won’t.

I also have some arthritis in my fingers and hands and the Foredom allows me to do things that I would find difficult and painful otherwise.

-- "One man alone can be pretty dumb sometimes, but for real bona fide stupidity, there ain't nothin' can beat teamwork." - Edward Abbey

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5645 posts in 4052 days


#12 posted 06-03-2019 05:52 PM

I do a good deal of sanding with an angle grinder equipped with an Arbortech Contour ROS attachment. Really does a nice job, but does have some limitations due to the length of the attachment.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Mike Turner's profile

Mike Turner

58 posts in 2545 days


#13 posted 06-04-2019 10:45 AM



My Neiko drills have metal gears. Most of the negative reviews were people using it for fairly heavy drilling. Lot of difference between drilling holes and sanding. Only issues have been brgs due to wood dust and wore out the brushes, replaceable, in one.

- OSU55


Great mine will just be used as a sander.Good to know Thanks!

-- Mike,North Carolina

View Mike Turner's profile

Mike Turner

58 posts in 2545 days


#14 posted 06-04-2019 10:47 AM



Keep your eyes out for a used Foredom flexible shaft outfit. I bought one 15 years ago and it s indispensable around the shop. It was several hundred dollars but has paid for itself many times. You can sand, cut, shape, carve in wood, metal, and plastics and do everything and more than a Dremel or other less powerful tool. It will fit into places a regular drill won t.

I also have some arthritis in my fingers and hands and the Foredom allows me to do things that I would find difficult and painful otherwise. I actually have one I bought way back about 1985…It still works.Ill dig it out….Thanks for “reminding ” me!

- sgcz75b


-- Mike,North Carolina

View Mike Turner's profile

Mike Turner

58 posts in 2545 days


#15 posted 06-04-2019 10:48 AM



I do a good deal of sanding with an angle grinder equipped with an Arbortech Contour ROS attachment. Really does a nice job, but does have some limitations due to the length of the attachment.

- TheDane


That looks interesting Ill keep it in mind! Thanks!

-- Mike,North Carolina

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